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TheViiginia 

S7th Year. No. 9. Virf^ofa Bwicli. Va. ^-^"^""^"^^"""THIJUlSr 



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Hunter Safety 

WhenRed 
Is Better 
Than Dead 

ByGregGoldfarb 
Sun, Editor 

To most Virginia Beach hunters, killing deer, 
quail, dove, rabbit, duck or 'coon is not their first 
concern when they take to the woods. Foremost in 
n their minds is safety. > 

Just as the deer idli in Virginia Beach has risen 
frcrni 30 in 1971 to 201 in 1982, also increasing is 
the number of hunters who vduntarily wear red 
clothing, or blaze orange to increase visibility and . 
help protect themselves while hunting in the dark 
forests. 

Recently, dptain James D. Kerreck, Virginia 
Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, 
addressed the Virginia Beach Safety Council. He 
cited figures reflecting a decreased number of 
hunting accidents and deaths in states dictating 
that hunters wear blaze orange clothing, hats, 
vests or kerchiefs while hunting. 

According to Kerreck, 30 states require blaze 
orange clothing for hunters. Massachusetts, tor 
example, in 1962 became the first state to require 
blaze orange. Subsequently, there has been no 
fatal de^r hunting accidents in that state, Keneck 
said. 

Beach Hunter In Favor 

M. L. "Pete" Dozier, 57, grew up in Black- 
water and has been a hunter all his life. He owns 
2,000 acres in the rural borough, and is a farmer. 
He is also the president of the Blackwater Hunt 
Qub. 

According to Wallace Hmmons, president (A 
the Virginia Beach Safety Coundl, these are the 
statistics for hunting accidents and deaths in 
the Qty of Virginia Beach during the period, July 
1, 1961 to June 30, 1982. Years that are not given 
<'t^ans that no fatalities or accidents occured. 
' 1963-'64: one accident. 

1964-'65: one accident. 

19i4-'66: one accident. 

19«6-'67: <me fatality. 

1967-'6S: one accident. 

1973-'74: one accident. 

1976-'77: one «:cident. 

1977-'78: two Kddcnts. 

1978-'79: one accident. 

1978-'80: emu fatality. 

1980-'81: two accidents. 

TOTAL: 11 accidents, two fetalities. 

"Hie record doesn't looli that bad/' TImmons 
said. "But I stiil say that a lot tf these people 
need to Imow how to handl e a gun." 

The club has between 20 and 25 members, all of 
whcMn adhere to Dozicr's rules, regulations and 
bylaws, which include: no drinking: everycme 
helps with the skinning; and shooting only deer. 

Dozier does not have a rule requiring all 
hunters in his party to wear blaze orange. 
However, practically dl of them do wear a piece of 
bright red clothing while hunting. 

Why do they do it? 

"For their protestion, my protection or any- 
one's protection," Doder said. 

Dozier said he doesn't feel he has a right to tell 
anrther man what to do, but that he would be 
"100% in favOT" of a state law requiring all 
Virginia hunters to wear blaw orange or bright 
red clothing while hunting. 

"Even if it's just a pull-on orange sleeve," 
Dewier added. 

Dozier stresses to members (rf his huiUing 
parties not to shoot anything unless they are 
abscdutely sure what they're shooting. 

"A man killed a d(« and he'll never hunt with 
me again." Dozier said. "1 can't afford it. 
Suppose it had been a man?" 

Dozier said more and mo-e hunters every year 
are taking to the woods, thus adding more fiiel to 
the call fw all hunters to wear bright clotl^ng. But 
Dozier, as much as he is in favw of the move, 
would not call on any legislators to push for it. 

"It's hard fw me to tell another man what to 
do." he said. 

Virginia Beach Game Warden Dtac Thoi 
suggests cMicemed hunters contact their Ic 
legislators over the issue. 

Dozier doesn't blame the laws, <s lack. of them, 
for hunting accidents, (k blames carelessness. 

"Carelessness is your No. 1 kilkr," Doder 
said. "If a man had a whole red suit on, and 
another man is careless, he could get kill^." 

Virginia Beach Commiisioacr. Vir|iata Coa- 
mi»lon of GaoM and IiAwd F b l erlw , Gkemk 
Croshaw said he would not want aU hunto-s to be 
required under law to wear blaze orange clothing. 
* "I would not be in fcvor trf it," he said, noting 
that the color of hunting clothes is not tlw key to 
iweventing hunting acadents. 

"You've got to stop carelessness," l« said. 
"Blaze orange won't do it." 

Game Warden ' Thom|»oa said that more 
hunting talas plwx in the Blackwater bwough of 
Virgina Beach than any other sectioq in tl» dty. 

The deer herd is increasing, she said, because 
(rf "the way the habiut has changed and tKe 
improved management of the deer herd." 

The number of deer kiUed in Virginia Beach 
since 1971 is as follows: 1971. 30 deer; 1972, 40; 
1973,71; 1974,84; 1975, M; 1976, 109; I9n, 114; 
SeeORA!iKiE.I>i^3 





Shep Saltzman, I, and Teddy Cleanthes 

Borough Parade 

Cartoon, Ballet, Symphony 
Concerts At Beach Theatre 

The Beach Theater, a defunct movie house in 
the Virginia Beach Borough on Atlantic Avenue at 
25th Street, has been transformed by two enter- 
prising Beach businessmen into what they hope 
will become a showplace for cultural events. 

Shep Saltzman and Teddy Cleanthes, owners of 
the Cafe Zoe Restaurant on Atlantic Avenue at 
40th Street, in January assumed management of 
the theater, bringing with them a virtual treasure 
chest full of entertainment. They plan to schedule 
cartoons and puppet shows for children, ballet 
and symphony for culture buffs, classic cinematic 
offerings from the silver screen for movie junkies, 
and concerts of varied musical persiruuions ihat 
should satisfy just about all tastes. 

"This is our effort to try to do something nice 
for the community," offered Cleanthes. 

The theater's first event under new management 
in January was a concert featuring the country- 
rock band Poco and local singer-guitarist, Lewis 
McGehee. "That first show was an absolutely 
phenomenal success," said Saltzman. "The recep- 
tion we received from the community was out- 
standing, and Poco just loved playing here." 

The band loved it, Saltzman said, because of the 
intimacy offered by the facility's structure. 
"We've got 1,200 seats here, which is small for a 
concert hall," he said. "Musicians are performers 
first, and in an old theater like this, they can really 
perform." Poco, a decade-old national recording 
act, has headlined in 20,000 seat arenas. "That's 
not a live perfomuuice." said Saltzman. "For the 
fans, that's like watching ants up on the stage." 

The Robbin Thompson Band performed at the 
theater recently, and scheduled for upcoming con- 
arts are Warren Zevon, Firefall, The Romantics, 
Golden Earring and Scandal. 

But, Saltzman hastened to add, there is much 
more to the new Beach Theater than rock and roll. 
Nationally acclaimed dancers from the Tidewater 
ballet are slated to perform there, as is a gospel 
singing group. Some of the movies scheduled for 
the theater include "Gone With The Wind," 
"West Side Story," "Ben Hur," and a surf film 
festival. For a recent showing of "Phantom of the 
Opera," Saltzman and Cleanthes hired an organist 
to accompany the movie. 

"We are going to have a little something for 
everybody here," said Saltzman. "We want this to 
be an entdlainment center that the people of 

See RESORT, Page 7 




. ne Vfeilflta Bcack Boroi^h .toloaited In tte. 
fw-c»tera re^on tl the dty, wmwa^d ^ the 
LjFWitai^ Boro n ^ to tte norlk, wcrt wii SMitt, 
ai herdcfcd hy tfw AteMe Ocean ta the OHt. 
Tht heroi^ ite a t«lal kmi mrm of 8.4 sqwve 
, «^ ins n c^MiM 9,175 ra^tento. 



Beer Bill Critics Claim 



Law Won't Reduce 

May *Kiir Some Businesses 





VA ciii'i ents 



" By Mike' Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

A bill raising the state's beer-buying age to 19, 
passed, last week by the General Assembly, will have 
little or no affect on reducing the number of 
aJcoiiol-related automobile accidents. 

That is the ccmsensus ^f several Virginia Beach 
experts, including a state legislator, a police depart- 
ment traffic analyst, the president of the Virginia Beach 
Council of PTA's, two nightclub owners and the 
chairperson of the mayor's committee on drunk driving. 

The law will,, however,have a big effect on some 
Mrginia Beach businessmen. "The law is going to kill 
me," said Ed Ruffln, co-owner of the Virginia Beach 
nightclub, Ptabody's, an establishment which has 
served a predominately 18 year-dd clientele for several 
years. 

Ilie beer-buying bill, scheduled to take effect July I, 
is a compromise measure. Gov. Charles S. Robb 
wanted the age raised to 21, as did many others 
throughout the state. The House of Delegates, in its 
original draft of the bill, had set the age at 21 years-old. 
The Senate wanted the age set at 19, however, and 
passed the measure unanimously. When the bill was 
sent back to the House, it won approval by a 67-32 vote. 
All Virginia Beach representatives supp(Mled the 
change except Del. Owen C Pickett, a democrat. 

"There were two things in the legislation which were 
very detrimental to our area," said Pickett. "One part 
of the legislation made reference that anyone serving 
drinb would have to be 21 years old. That would put a 
lot of people out of work. Secondly, there was a 
requirement that a perscm would have to take a class in 
alcohol education prior to obtaining a driver's license. 
That will cause a lot of unlicensed drivers on our roads. 

"Instead of changing the 
drinking age, what we need is a 
sound, well-administered education 
program," - Delegate Owen C. 
Pickett, the only Virginia Beach 
delegate to vote against the new 
^drinking law 

"It's not just the youngsters who are driving drunk," 
Pickett continued. "Instead of changing the drinking 
age, what we need is a sound, well-administered 
education program. 1 certainly don't ccmdone drinking, 
but alcdiol has been a part of western civilizaticm for 
thousands of years and it is not going to go away. I'm 
confident that 18 year-olds are mature and rcsptmsible 
adults. I'm not sure, we should take this away from 
them. If we are gang to try to do something about 
drunk driving, gang about it in this way won't help." 

The new legislation replaces a year-old law, which 
permits 18 year-olds to buy beer in restaurants and 
nightclubs but limits the carry-out purchase of beer to 
those 19 and dder. One must be 21 to purchase wine 
and distilled spirits. In July, 1974, 18 year-olds were 
given the right by the General Assembly to purchase 
beer both on and off premises. 



Since that time, however, alcohol -related automobile 
accidents involving 16-20 year-dd drivers in Virginia 
have increased 216 percent, from 1,900 in 1973 to 4,300 
in 1979. hi Virginia Beach last year, those in the 16-20 
age bracket, roughly 10 percent of the population, 



Alcohol Related 
Accidents By Age 



(In Virginia Beach) 



\ 



29.4 



28.1 



20<^o 
15*^0 

5% 



26.1 



23.8 



%*? 



P 



•ft-* 16.3 



J?i 






JiL 




20-and 
under 



21-24 25-29 



J- 



19811 



1982; 



Figures supplied by the f^irginia Beach Police 
Department 



accounted for 26.1 percent of all alcohd-related traffic 
accidents. 

Still, many persons remain unconvinced that raising 
to 19 the age for beer-buyfng will lower these figures. 
One such skeptic is officer Paul J. Lanleigne, the 
Virginia Beach Pdice Department's chief traffic 
analyst. "It's questionable," he said. "What is one 
year going to do? Your guess is as' good as mine. I 
^yppose this change should cut down on the frequency 
of alcohol-related accidents invdving tennagers. If 
nothing else, it has gotten the whole problem of drunk 
driving in the public eye. 

"My personal opinion is that changing the age to 21 
would be a big help," Lanteigne continued. "Speaking 
as (Mie who works with these statistics and who goes out 
and works these accidents and sees all the blood, I can 
say that going to 21 would be an improvement. But, it 
hasn't been that long since I was that age, and 1 can 

See NEW, Page 3 




Kempsville Over Kellam 

Kempsville's Chiefs to play in Eastern Regional Basketball Tournament. See story, Page 14 



Council Considers Question 



Noona Suggested To Head Beach Pops 



ByLeeCahill 

Sun Council Reponer 

The Virginia Beach Arts 
and Humanities Commis- 
sion has aslKd Qty.Counr 
cil to endorse the 
reestablishment of the 
Virginia Beach Pops 
OrclMstra under conduct- 
or Walter Noona. 



In asking Council for its 
support, James W. Roe- 
buck, Cnnmission chair- 
man, said that the Com- 
missioii budget for. the 
year 1983-84 ii^ludes a 
Virginia Ochestra Ooup 
(VOG) grant request erf 
S38,S00 to support the 
ftjps series with the stipu^ 



lation that Nkxma conduct 
eight scheduled concerts. 
"It is not our intention to 
disburse those funds to 
the yOGif the stipulation 
is not met," Roebtttk 
said. 

Council also revived a 
letter from Jerry P. 
Haynie, executive directw 



of the VOG. asking for the 
$38,500 for the ftill sup- 
pori of the 1983-84 p<^ 
series.. He stated he 
regretted Noona's deci- 
sion but that VOG would 
continue the 9ap% series 
and would bring in gMst 
condiMKOrs uhI gMSt per- 
SeeUACH.nwt* 



■I 



VHMI 



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mm 



2 Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, IW3 



Sun Commentary 



i 





Editorials 



1 Falls Short 



What was really accomplished by the 
General Assembly in passing the new 
beer-buying bill, making it illegal for 
anyone under 19 to purchase beer? 

The primary aim of the state's 
legislators was to somehow find a way to 
lower the number of alcohol-relate traf- 
fic accidents. The suspicion is, however, 
that the new law will produce opposite ef- 
fects. 

Fact: The majority of alcohol-related 
traffic accidents is not caused by persons 
16-20 years old, the people affected by the 
new law. The segment of the population 
most responsible for such accidents are 
those between the ages of 21 and 24. 

Consider the Virginia Bieach resident 
who turns 18 this July 1, the day the new 
law goes into effect. After registering at 
the city's voter registrar in the municipal 
center, the young man heads over to the 
post office and signs up for the Selective 
Service. Then, upon arriving at a nearby 
pub, the resident is denied a glass of beer. 
"You're not an adult yet, son," the 
barkeep explains. 

When he was 17, the young man con- 
ned his 18 year-old friend into buying him 
beer. Now, at 18, the lad finds himself 
still unable to imbibe. So, what's the 
fellow to do? His friend is now 19, so the 
thirsty young man again seeks the older 
boy's assistance. And so it will go. 

Bar owners feel their 18 year-old 
patrons will now cruise around in their 
cars, drinking beer purchased for them by 
older friends. Instead of getting alcohol 
off the roads, the General Assembly has 
succeeded in putting right back, they say. 
It would seem, then, that the only pCMtioti 
of soeiety4«iiy.teu«hed h^ tbeiiMiHiiaw is 
the bar owners. 

From all corners of the Common- 
wealth, a resounding battle cry has been 
heard to fight drunk driving. Even though 
they were not the most accident-prone 
drivers, the 16-20 year-olds were, none- 
theless, involved in a great many alcohol- 



related accidents. The most repeated 
demand was that the age for drinking all 
liquors should be raised to 21 . ^^ 

The lawmakers had a hard time with 
that proposition. They agreed with the 
notion^ 'if you're old enough to fight, 
you're old enough to drink." How then 
could the government tell a young person 
to fight for his country, to pay his taxes, 
and that he was old enough to vote, but 
that he couldn't drink beer? 
They didn't want to, but they did. 
what was born instead was a com- 
promise. Gov. Robb had fought hard for 
making the switch to 21 years-old. The 
Senate and the House could not see eye- 
to-eye with the governor, though, and the 
final bill was adopted. 

It was a bland piece of legislation. 
Statistics can be manipulated in many 
ways, but the facts are the facts. Fact: 
young people are dying on Virginia's 
roads, and alcohol, in many cases, is the 
reason. 

If the General Assembly had been truly 
commited to doing something about 
drunk driving, it should have taken 
drastic steps. The drnking age should 
have been set at 21, despite the arguments 
from bar owners and 18 to 20 year-olds. 
Stricter and tougher laws should have 
been passed which deal with convicted 
drunk drivers. If one is found guilty of 
drunk driving, suspend his license for 10 
years and throw him in jail to boot. A 
more thorough and com^ehensive 
alcohol education program should be in- 
troduced in the public schools, beginning 
in the primary grades. Why not even 
lower the speed limits again, if clearly the 
intentiis to make.highways saf^? 

It will only be when lawmakers become 
deadly serious about curbing deadly 
drunk driving that Virginia's highways 
become truly free of this menance. Until 
then, three facts will continue to haunt us: 
People will drink. People will drive. 
People will die.— M.M.G. 



A Twig Of Sense 



Anyone with a twig of common sense 
would not think of hunting in the woods 
without wearing brightly colored 
clothing. Except, that is, for hunters who 
are after game that aren't color blind. 

Virginia Beach has been fortunate. Sin- 
ce 1%1 there have been only 11 hunting 
related accidents and two fatalities in the 
city. But the encouraging record does not 
diminish the potential for more accidents 
and deaths in the future. 

Hunters will say that guns do not cause 
the accidents; it's the careless handlers of 
them that are responsible. Too often a 
hunter may carry a loaded gun over his 
back, or step into a boat without checking 
the gun's chambers. Sometimes these ab- 
sent-minded activities can result in 
tragedy. 

The Virginia Commission of Game and 
Inland Fisheries has held numerous gun 
safety programs in the Virginia Beach 
Vocational-Technical Cento-, as weU as 
the London Bridge Gun Shop. Hundreds 



of Virginia Beach hunting enthusiasts 
have attended them. 

It stands to reason that Virginia 
Beach's low hunting accident and fatality 
rate may correlate with the frequency of 
hunter safety programs. In this respect, 
hunter safety programming should con- 
tinue so that more lives may be saved. 

At question now, however, is whether 
hunters should be requried by the state to 
wear blaze orange clothing while hunting, 
and whether the public school system 
should include hunter safety in its 
curriculum. 

All hunters should wear blaze orange, 
or bright r«l clothing when hunting, 
whether they're on private or public hun- 
ting grounds. 

The school system, however; does not 
n^d to include hunter safety in its 
academic curriculum. Local groups, in 
cooperation with local schools and 
business^, are filling the need and at no 
ocpense to the taxpayer.— G.D.G. 



Apple Butter Left 



There's only four jars of that delicious 
apple butter left for sale at The Virginia 
Beach Sun newsroom. Readers might 
recall that it is being sold by the Virginia 
Beach Jaycees to raise money for Camp 
Virginia JaycMs. 



Camp Virginia Jayce^ is held every 
summer for one week near Roanoke for 
handicapped children. 

The Vir^nia ^ach Jaycew say they're 
"fired up" over the apple butter sales. 
How about you? 



Winning Article 



Letters To The Editor 



Editor: 

I really enjoyed your article on >%giiua Beach 
"winners." There are certainly more wiiuiers in the 
city that you interviewed, but your aitide did give an 
insight into the minds vi a few suocessAil Wginia 
Beach people. 

I agree with them all. To be a winner you need 



Reporter's View Of Jail 

Editor: 

So, You sent your reporter Gooding up tlK river for a 
few days to get an insicte lode at jail? What a s{rieiidkl 
idea. While ABC News spent the week covering crime 
from the outside looking in , The Virginia Beach Sun 



dedkatkn. honesty and a goal. Comminkation is 

imperative, and coopenulon between parties is a must. 

Please cantiaae to print stories Uke your last one on 

winners, and The VlrgiiUa Beach Sun wUI conUnue to 

be a winner also. 

Mrs. Mary Smith, 

Wginia Beach 



bad the guts to find out far itself the real score. 
I've got to hMui it to you, nobody goes out of their 

way for a story like you §u)ft. 

Ruby Schwartz 
Virginia Beach 



Editors Note: VirgMa WuOt IMcgaic Okm McChau b 
ma II !■ Ihc paper. Fed f rac to aanvtr the <a««ao ai, cat aat, ud ntara !• Mcdaaaa, 

QUESTIONNAIRE 



hi Vifiiaia iMdi. aad aikcd TkeSiui (o 



I have sponsored legislation conceniing the appointment of Sdiod Board Members by Qty Council 
that would require: 



(1) that persons willing to serve in this important position file tlwir names with the City Manager no 
less than 30 days before the appointtnents are to be made, togattaer with such information about 
themselves as they wish to provide; 

(2) that not less than 10 days thereafter, and before the tpjpdateamii are made, there would be a 
Public Hearing at which time the public would be invited io oomment; 

(3) that sometime before the appointments «re made, the Qty Council would have the opportunity 
to interview the candidates to permit them to better compare their qualifications and other 
relevant factors. 



I FAVOR THIS BILL 
Comments : 



D 
Yes 



D 
No 



2. The legislation permitting a statewide referendum on the question of whether there should be a 
a Virginia State Lottery did not pass. 



DO YOU FAVOR THIS LEGISLATION? 



a 

Yes 



D 
No 



Comments: 



3. One of my top priorities has been improvement to the roads that espedaUy serve central Vurginia 
Beach, such as the Virginia Beach-Norfolk Expressway, Holland Rotd, Princess Anne Road and the 
synchronization of the traffic lights on Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

WHAT ROAD PROJECTS IN OUR AREA ARE MOST MPGBJANT TO YOU? 



4. Sin(% the Virginia Beach Campus of the Tidewater Community CoUeg e is in the 84th House of 
Delegates District which I represent. I feel a particular responsibility to assure the quality of its 



service. 



PLEASE COMMEOTONTHE SERVICE OT TOB FACniTY..^ 



S. Hease use the reverse side of this questionnaire to express aikBtional ideas and thoughts. 



REIURNTOc 



Delegate Qkta B. McOaiMU 

3224 Burnt Mm Rowt 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23432 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

77i« Virginia Beach Sun wektmies and »coitf«ges kOen to the effitiff on ai^ and all Virginia Beach 
issuM. as weU as any other isnKS, qiwsticms m eoaeenu afftct^ ikt w^ iM^i of the Virginia Beach 
community. Letters shouM be typed, dmible qwoed miUn^nit Aa intoa^ wmtt Mldren ud te^hmu 
number. Mail letto^ to Tlu Virginki Beach Sun, 131 S. loaamoat Road, Viig^Sm^ Va. 234S2. 



The Virginia Be&di Sun 



13S Soalh RcNcnoirt RoMi, Virgtata IMK*. Vft. }|«9n«i«(M« ^6.3430 
USPS-M9-140; 



Withu HdewatcriUea 
OneYear.^ 

AllOtha->y«M 
OneYcar-SU 
Two Years- SI7 

Second Oass Post^e b paid at LyaalMyen Stttioa. 
Virgil Beach. Vii^oia 
Tlu Virginki BemJti^mkmi 



aa 



VirginiaBeachSun, March 2, 1983 3 



«* 



New Beer DrinBng Law Gets Mixed Reactions 



'!t'iimMatfimiiiiliHi»HmiiiiUwfi;(;,.nit»^uuui.' i ' , 
Continued trom Pace I legislature would change the age to 21 off-premises 



appreciate that 18 year-dds who can be drafted and 
who can vote want to be able to driiUc a ccid been" 

"It's questionable. What is one 
year going to do? Your gu^ss^ as 
good as mine. " - Paul'J.Signteigne^ 
Virginia Beach Police Department 
Chief Traffic Analyst ' 

"I dcm't know if the impact will be significant," said 
Dolores Delaney, president of the Virginia Beach 
Council of PTA's. "As far as affecting alcohol in the 
schools, the new law won't do anything. Perhaps it will 
deter snne, but in reality, you just can't legislate 
morality. Those who want to drink are going to be able 
to, no matter what the law is. We've made the speed 
limit SS, but it hasn't kept pet^le from going over 35, 
has it? ... 



-w* 



"Perhaps it will deter some, but 
in reality, you Just can't legislate 
morality. Those who want to drink 
are going to be able to, no matter 
what the law is." - Virginia Beach 
Council of PTA 's President Dolores 
Delaney 

"By and large, the bc«t<:faitnof''tiie bill is the 
inclusicm of a mandatory akiMniasdv^on class in the 
high schools," Delaney continued. "Substance abuse 
is an epidemic problem in Virginia Beach and across 
the country. Kids are subject to iwwoae pressure. We 
would be well served to begift^Mhioatiiigt them as early 
as possible, maybe even in kindergarten. 

"llie bottom line," Ddaa^.fCODOluded. "is that 
people are dying because of laRxdMi: foid drug related 
accidents." An answer, she said, is raising the drinking 
age to 21 years-old. 

Lillian DeVinney, chairpersoi of Virginia Beach 
Mayor Louis R. Jones' taak force on drunk driving and 
vice president for the Virginia Beach Chapter of Many 
Against Drunk Driving, questioned the new law. 

"I'm not too convinced changing 
the drinking age to 19 is going to 
make significant reductions in 
highway fatalities," Lillian DeVin- 
ney, chairperson of Mayor's Task 
Force on Drunk Driving 

" r m not 1 65 convfncedchangihg the 'dnhlong "age Id" 
19 is going to make significant reducticms in highway 
fatalities," she said. "MADD had hc^d that the 



across the bou-ds. With this law, we are not going to 
see a significant change in the rate of highway 
fataUtues." 

DiVinney admitted that this legislation discriminates 
against 18 year-olds. "If the government has said the 
age of majority is 18, to say thou shalt not drink beer is 
very unfiur,'* she said. "All drunk driving cannot be 
attributed to one age group. If we raised the age of 
ntajority to 21 across the boards it would be fine with 
me. As it stands, though, the law is very ambiguous. 

"It is going to take 10 years of ccmstant pressure cm 
the state government before we make any real progress 
in reducing drunk driving deaths," DeVinney con- 
tinued. "We have to raise the public awareness and 
make people believe that drinking and driving is totally 
unacceptable. We have to ask for stronger laws against 
those who drink and drive. We have to see suppot from 
the judges, which we are not seeing now. People are 
not gdng to stop drinking and driving until they 
honestly believe they will get their driver's licenses 
suspended. 

"I lost my daughter to a drunk driver; he's still 
drinking and he's still driving." DeVinney said. "And I 
know that even she wouldn't want this new law as it 
is." 

Fit Ricks, owner of Blue Pete's seafood restaurant on 
North Muddy Qeek Road and president of the Virginia 
Bcacii Restaurant Association, called the legislation, 
"absurd." 



'7/ used to that an 18 year-old 
guy could drink in a casual at- 
mosphere. Now, he's going to be 
forced to get his older buddy to buy 
beer for him, and he'll have to drive 
around in his car and drink. Isn't 
that exactly what the legislature was 
trying to avoid?" - Pat Ricks, 
president of the Virginia Beach 
Restaurant Association 

"It used to be that an 18 year-dd guy could drink in a 
casual atmosphere," said Ricks. "Now, he's going to 
be forced to get his dder buddy to buy beer for him, 
and he'll have to drive arcHind in his car and drink. Isn't 
that exactly what the legislature was trying to avoid? 

"Also, a young guy doesn't have a lot of money, 
right?" Ricks asked. "Suppose he cmly has $3. to a bar, 
that buys maybe two beers. But, in a store, $3 buys a 
whde six pack. This law is going to do more to 
contribute to drunk driving then it is to curb it." 

Ruffin, who along with his partner, Nabil Kassir, 
owns Pcabody's and Rogue's in the resort section of 
Virginia Beach, predicts the chane in law will have 
negative effects. 

"Instead of keeping drunks off the road, this new law 
is noing to put more of them on the road," he said. 
."Befpre-the law Was changed, 18 year-olds were in a 



contrdled environment. Now, they're just gdng to get 
their 19 year-dd friends to buy their beer and they'll be 
out on the streets cruising, llie law pushes them back 
out into their cars." 



"When the new law goes into ef- 
fect, we're going to lose hundreds 
of thousands of dollars. Besides my 
personal losses, the city's going to 
lose some tourists, and there will be 
a loss of jobs and tax revenues. " - 
Ed Riiffin, Virginia Beach night- 
club owner 

At Peabody's, mote than SO percent of his clientele is 
18 years dd, RufRn said. "When the new law goes into 
eiTect. we're gdng to lose hundreds of thousands of 
ddlars," he said. "Besides my personal losses, the 
city's gdng to lose some tourists, and there will be a 
loss of jobs and tax revenues. 

"1 believe the lawmakers were sincere in their 
attempt to do something about the carnage on our 
highways," said Ruffin. "But I doi't think you can 
target one segment of the population for this problem. 
The legislature had to pass this bill to make them lode 
like they were taking a big stand." 

Ruffin concluded: "I don't think this law will make 
one bit of difference in alcohd-related traffic acci- 
dents." 

Iliose Who Supported Bill 

Del. Julie Smith, a democrat, said her vote 
supporting the bill, "was not one that I'm too proud 
of." Said Smith: "I think we moved too fast cm this 
legislation. Maybe we should have waited until next 
year before making a change." 

"I wasn't too comfortable with 
the bill, but I could see that the pros 
outweighed the cons . . . I suspect 
this question is going to come up 
again next year and if it does, a lot 
of people who supported it will now 
have second thoughts. I may be one 
of them" - Delegate Julie Smith 

Smith agreed with the original bill submitted by the 
House, which moved the age to 21 years-dd. "I wasn't 
too comfortable with it, but 1 could see where the pro's 
outweighed the con's. The thing that really convinced 
me to go with it was the statistics which showed the 
high rate of teen deaths invdving alcohd. When the 
Mil came back at 19, 1 didn't know what to do. 

"In the legislative-process, you ieam that if you are 
gdng to survive in Richmond, you better damn well 
stick by your guns," Smith continued. "I suspect this 



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Art Program 

Schools In National Ed. Study 



The Virgnia Beach 
Public Schools art 
program has been chosen 
to participate in a national 
art education study 
prepared by the J. Paul 
Getty Trust's Center for 
Education in the Arts. A 
total of seven art 
education programs of 
public schools in the 
United States were selec- 
ted as exemplary and 
scheduled for visits by a 
research team from the 
Getty Trust and the Rand 
Corporation. 



A national search was 
made late last year for art 
programs that provide 
comprehensive instruction 
in the regular curriculum, 
including the elements of 
art history, criticism, and 
studio production. The 
Virginia Beach program 



was recommended by the 
Virginia Department of 
Education. 

In January, Dr. Brent 
WilsiJft>>author, resear- 
cher, and) professor at 
Penn State University, 
visited Virginia Beach 
schools to determine if the 
program merited inclusion 
in the project. Shortly 
thereafter, in his letter to 
Stephena Runyan, art 
coordinator of Virginia 
Beach Public Schools, 
Wilson said he had written 
his fellow researchers that 
"a study of your program 
is a must." 

He added, "The work 
you are doing could 
provide an important 
exemplary model useful to 
the entire field of art 
education." 

Wilson and a Rand 
Corporation research 
analyst will begin their 
study of the art program 



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in Virginia Beach schools 
the week of February 28- 
March 4. While Wilson 
studies the art activities in 
detail and highlights areas 
of particular interest, a 
Rand researcher will ex- 
plore issues associated 
with initiating, im- 
plementing, and 
sustaining the art program 
within the school system. 

The Getty Center of 
Education in the Arts will 
publish the results of its 
research project in 1984 
and make them available 
to educators, school per- 
sonnel, and the general 
public. 

Runyan said, "They are 
looking at programs that 
incorporate concepts of 
teaching art as well as the 
use of products. Our 
curriculum qualifies. ' ' 

She also said that the 
case study will include 
examining why the 
Virginia Beach program is 
such a positive one. 
"They'U be looking for 
the things that make it 
work, and we'll be glad to 
show them." 



question is gdng to come up again next year and if it 
does, a lot of the people who supported it will now have 
second thoughts. I may be one of them." ' ' 

Del. W.R. "Bufter O'Brien, a republican, said he 
suppOTted the bill to, "get drunk drivers off the road 
and to make the roads safer. 

"This was a good compromise," O'Brien continued. 
"We can objectively defend it. Personally, 1 thought it 
was a pditically attractive thing to suppwt and that is 
why it sucQeeded." 



"This was a good compromise. 
We can objectively, defend it. I 
thought it was a politically attrac- 
tive thing to support and that is why 
it succeeded, " - Delegate W. R. 
"Buster" O'Brien 

Will the law work? "I think so," said O'Brien. "It 
will succeed in two ways. Number one, there is the 
mandatory alcohd education class, and that is bound to 
do some good. Second, if you arc caught drinking under 
age now, your driver's license can be taken away for up 
to 30 days. That's bound to deter some peqjie." 

Del. J.W. "Billy" O'Brien, a democrat, said he is 
"quite willing to live with the new law," althcxigh he 
would rather have seen the purchase age for 
off-premises consumption of beer raised to 21 
years-old. O'Brien has long advocated a change to 19 
for beer-buying because, he said, "18 year-olds in high 
school have no business drinking beer. It is very 
disruptive to the educational process. 



7 



"I've worked with kids for over 
30 years. Kids are going to drink no 
matter what. If we really wanted to 
deter drinking, maybe we should 
have raised the age to 26. " - 
Delegate J. W. "Billy" O'Brien 

"I've worked with kids for 30 years," said the former 
football coach at Great Bridge High School in 
Chesapeake. "Kids are going to drink no matter what. 
If we really wanted to deter drinking, maybe we should 
have raised the age to 26." 

O'Brien said he does not expect to see a significant 
decline in alctrfiol-related car accidents because of the 
legislation. "The real culprit there," he said, "is the 
conveniences stores. We're going to have to do 
sanething about them." 

"I can accept this law and hope that it works," said 
Del. Glenii B. McQaoan, a democrat. "I hope that if 
nothing else, it sends a signaFto all Virginians that the 
state is sedouT'when it says it doesn't approve of 
drinkingyAtd driving." 

gamatessmBasmemsBBssamm^sssss 

7 can accept this new law and 

hope that it works. I hope thdt if 

nothing else, it sends a signal to all 

Virginians that the state is serious 

when it says it doesn't approve of 

drinking and driving. " - Delegate 

Glenn B. McClanan 

McGanan said he was reluctant to support the bill at 
first because he has "a hard time supporting anything 
that alters substantially the rights of individuals." 
Upon being exposed to statistics presented by MADD 
and others, however, McQanan decided to support the 
change. "I fully rec(%nize the value of each and every 
life, and this was a way of maybe saving some lives." 

McQanan was uncertain of the impact the law will 
have on reducing alcohol-related accidents. "I hope it 
has a big effect, but being candid, I'm jmt not sure it 
will ," he said. "It's all up to the attitudes of the 
individuals, and I think the schools and the media are 
going to be more meaningful in making changes that 
the new law will be." 

Sen. A. Joseph Canada, Jr., who also supported the 
bill, could not be reached. 



JMU Speaker 

Butswinkas Is Tops 



Dane Butswinkas of 
Virginia Beach, a senior at 
Jama Madison Univer- 
sity, has been named the 
top speaker at the U.S. 
Naval Academy In- 
vitational Debate Tour- 



CiMtsn Mtf praivMri of fMMy, IMV cMt 

OFFSET MEWSPAPBfS 
AndCIKCULARS 



CfMyMv MapMMlM^ 



BYERLY PUBUCATKmS 



M S2T-5IO0ftra nam t 



nament held recently in 
Annapolis. 

The award was ^^t- 
swinkas' third top in- 
dividual award of the 
year. 

The JMU team of But- 
swinkas and senior Shelly 
James were named co- 
champions of the tour- 
nament along with the 
JMU team of freshmen 
Brian James and Beth 
Gray. The JMU teams 
were the last two 
remaining teams after the 
elimination rounds, and 
rather than debate each 
other, the teams were 
named co-champions by 
tournament officials. 



MICHAEL F. 

FASANARO, JR. 

Attorney 
AtUw 

461-6121 

S K(^ EsiKrutive Center 
SUITE 220 

NorfoUt, Va. 23502 



imam 



mmmm 



2 Virginia Beacii Sun, March 2, 1983 



~> 



Sun Commenlaiy 




I 



I 




Editorials 



1 Falls Short 



What was really accomplished by the 
General Assembly in passing the new 
beer-buying bill, making it illegal for 
anyone under 19 to purchas([^beer? 

The primary aim of the state's 
legislators was to somehow find a way to 
lower the number of alcohol-related traf- 
fic accidents. The suspicion is, however, 
that the new law will produce opposite ef- 
fects. 

Fact: The majority of alcohol-related 
traffic accidents is not caused by persons 
16-20 years old, the p^>ple affected by the 
new law.. The segment of the population 
most responsible for such accidents are 
those between the ages of 21 and 24. 

Consider the Virginia Beach resident 
who turns 18 this July 1, the day the new 
law goes into effect. After registering at 
the city's voter registrar in the municipal 
center, the young man heads over to the 
post office and signs up for the Selective 
Service. Then, upon arriving at a nearby 
pub, the resident is denied a glass of beer. 
"You're not an adult yet, son," the 
barkeep explains. 

When he was 17, the young man con- 
ned his 18 year-old friend into buying him 
beer. Now, at 18, the lad finds himself 
still unable to imbibe. So, what's the 
fellow to do? His friend is now 19, so the 
thirsty young man again seeks the older 
boy's assistance. And so it will go. 

Bar owners feel their 18 year-old 
patrons will now cruise around in their 
cars, drinking beer purchased for them by 
older friends. Instead of getting alcohol 
off the roads, the General Assembly has 
succeeded in putting right back, they say. 
It would seem, then, that the only p<Htion 
of society^tfttly'touahad jiy tht jimm laiif if 
the bar owners. 

From all corners of the Common- 
wealth, a resounding battle cry has been 
heard to fight drunk driving. Even though 
they were not the most accident-prone 
drivers, the 16-20 year-olds were, none- 
theless, involved in a great many alcohol- 



related accidents. The most repeated 
demand was that the age for drinking all 
liquors should be raised to 21 . 
' The lawmakers had a hard time with 
that proposition. They agreed with the 
notion, "If you're old enough to fight, 
you're old enough to drink." How then 
could the government tell a young person 
to fight for his country, to pay his taxes, 
and that he was old enough to vote, but 
that he couldn't drink beer? 
They didn't want to, but they did. 
what was born instead was a com- 
promise. Gov. Robb had fought hard for 
making the switch to 21 years-old. The 
Senate and the House could not see eye- 
to-eye with the governor, though, and the 
final bill was adopted. 

It was a bland piece of legislation. 
Statistics can be manipulated in many 
ways, but the facts are the facts. Fact: 
young people are dying on Virginia's 
roads, and alcohol, in many cases, is the 
reason. 

If the General Assembly had been truly 
commited to doing something about 
drunk driving, it should have taken 
drastic steps. The drnking age should 
have been set at 21, despite the arguments 
from bar owners and 18 to 20 year-olds. 
Stricter and tougher laws should have 
been passed which deal with convicted 
drunk drivers. If one is found guilty of 
drunk driving, suspend his license for 10 
years and throw him in jail to boot. A 
more thorough and comprehensive 
alcohol education program should be in- 
troduced in the public schools, beginning 
in the primary grades. Why not even 
lower the speed limits again, if clearly the 
intent'is to mske.highways safer? 

It will only be when lawmakers become 
deadly serious about curbing deadly 
drunk driving that Virginia's highways 
become truly free of this menance. Until 
then, three facts will continue to haunt us: 
People will drink. People will drive. 
People will die.— M.M.G. 



A Twig Of Sense 



Anyone with a twig of common sense 

9 would not think of hunting in the woods 

without wearing brightly colored 

clothing. Except, that is, for hunters who 

are after game that aren't color blind. 

Virginia Beach has been fortunate. Sin- 
ce 1961 there have been only 11 hunting 
related accidents and two fatalities in the 
city. But the encouraging record does not 
diminish the potential for more accidents 
and deaths in the future. 

Hunters will say that guns do not cause 
the accidents; it's the careless handlers of 
them that are responsible. Too often a 
hunter may carry a loaded gim over his 
back, or step into a boat without checking 
the gun's chambers. Sometimes these ab- 
sent-minded activities can result in 
tragedy. 

The Virginia Commission of Game and 
Inland Fisheries has held numerous gun 
safety prograi^ in the Virginia Beach 
Vocational-Technical Center, as well as 
the London Bridge Gun Shop. Hundreds 



of Virginia Beach hunting enthusiasts 
have attended them. 

It stands to reason that Virginia 
Beach's low hunting accident and fatality 
rate may correlate with the frequency of 
hunter safety programs. In this respect, 
hunter safety programming should con- 
tinue so that more lives may be saved. 

At question now, however, is whether 
hunters should be requried by the state to 
wear blaze orange clothing while hunting, 
and whether the public school system 
should include hunter safety in its 
curriculum. 

All hunters should wear blaze orange, 
or bright red clothing when hunting, 
whether they're on private or public hun- 
ting grounds. 

The school system, however; does not 
need to include hunter safety in its 
academic curriculum. Local groups, in 
cooperation with local schools and 
businesses, are filling the need and at no 
oipense to the taxpayer.— G.D.G. 



Apple Butter Left 



There's only four jars of that delicious 
apple butter left for sale at The Virginu 
Beach Sun newsroom. Read^s might 
recall that it is being sold by the Virginia 
Beach Jaycees to raise money for Camp 
Virginia Jaycees. 



Camp Virginia JaycMs is held every 
summer for one week near Roanoke for 
handiaipped children. 

The Virginia Beach Jayce^ say they're 
"fir«l up" over the apple butter sales.. 
How about you? 



Winning Article 



Letters To The Editor 



Editor; 

I really eiijoyed your article on Virginia Beach 
"winners." There are ceruunly more wini»rs in the 
city that you interviewed, but your artide did give an 
insight into the minds of a few si^cessftil Virginia 
Beach people. 

I agree with them all. To be a winner you Med 



Reporter's View Of Jail 

Editor: 

So, You sent your reporter Goocttng up tlK river for a 
few days to get an inside lock at jail? What a splendid 
idea. While ABC News spent the week covering crime 
from the outside looidng in , The Vlrginki Beach Sun 



dedicttkn. honesty and a goal. Comminication is 

imperaUve, and coopeiatioo between parties is a must. 

Please continue to priitt stories Uke your last one on 

winners, and The ytrgbik Beach Sun wUl continue to 

be a winner alsa 

Mrs. Mary Smith, 

Virginia Beadi 



had the guu to find out far ittelf tlM real score. 

I've got to haiui it to you. nobody goes out of their 
way for a story like you guys. 

Ruby Schwartz 
Virginia Beach 



Edilon Note: Vii^nla Bfach IMcgate Ghn MeOaMi b 
ran it la the paper. Fed fne lo aamrcr Ike qaciiioM, cat oat, ud retara lo 



QUESTIONNAIRE 



laVhitala 



i,aad8ikc4r*«5iMto 



I have sponsored legislation cooceming the appointment Ot School Board Members by Qty Council 
that would require: 

(1) that persms willing to serve in this important position file their nanus with the City Nfanager no 
less than 30 days before the appointments are to be nude, U)f ether witk ivsih information about 
themselves as they wish to provide; 

(2) that not less than 10 days thereafter, and before the appointmetts are made, there would be a 
Public Hearing at which time the public would be invited to comment; 

(3) that sometime before the appointments are made, the Qty Council would have the opportunity 
to interview the candidates to permit them to better compare their qualifications and other 
relevant factors. 



I FAVOR THIS BILL 



D 
"Yes 



D 
No 



Comments:. 



2. The legislation permitting a statewide referendum on the question of whetlMr thett should be a 
a Virginia State Lottery did not pass. 



DO YOU FAVOR THIS LEGISLATION? 



a 

Yet 



D 
No 



Comments: 



One of my top prio-ities has been improvement to the roads that espeqially serve central Vu-ginia 
Beach, such as the Virginia Beach-Norfoik Expressway, HoUand Roid, Watetu Anne Road and the 
synchronization of the traffic lights on Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

WHAT ROAD PROJECTS IN OUR AREA ARE MOST IMPCMtTANT TO YOU? 



4. Since the Virginia Beach Campus of the Tidewater Community College is in tbe 84tii Ifouse of 
Delegates District which I represent. I feel a particular responsiWUty to assure the quality oi its 
service. 



PIEASE COMMENT ON THE SERVICE OF THIS FAdLnY.,^ 



S. nease use the reverse side of this questionnaire to exjmss KMitionai Ideas and thoughts. 



RETURNTOc 

Detegate CSenn B. McOaaan 

3224 Burnt Mm RoMi 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 234S2 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

Tlie Virginki Beach Sun wekmnes and aKoumges tetters to the edtt^ <m any and aU Virginia Beach 
issues, as weU as any other issues, questicMU or cmwem ^fctfa^ ttf i^ Iwfa^ of the Virginia Beach 
community. Letters should be typed, dmibk qMoed Mid tef^ide t^nrtftiss atme, addren uid telqthone 
number. Mail letters to Tfu Virginki Beech Sua, 131 S. RosomM Road, Vli^lip Bodi, Va. 23432. 



The Virginia B^h Sun 



138 South RoseoKHit Road, Vifilirit Bwi^ Va. a3(l»th«ie(M4) 4^.3430 
USPS-MO-140;i 



GngiSMMM 



WiUiin metmaAnii 

OneYear-S9 

AllCMiCTAreas 

OneYear-$ll 

T»oYetf«-$I7 

Scc(M»l Ctass P{^ate te pirid M LyMtevn Statiott. 
V^tateBeMk.VkiUB 
lluybjbiki Beach Sunkmi 



M^H 



■■ 



wmm 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 1983 3 



New Beer Drinking Law Gets Mixed Reactions 

Continued rrom Pige I lesisiature would chanse the aae to 21 off-Dremises controlled environment. Ncm. they're lust Boina to eet Question is ooino tn cnme nn aoam n<.«f v* 



appreciate that 18 year-dds who can be drafted and 
who can vote want to be able to drink a cdd beer.'-' 

"It's questionable. What is one 
year going to do? Your guess is as 
good as mine. *' - Paulf; Lanteigne» 
Virginia Beach Mice Department 
Chief Traffic Anatyst 

"I don't know if the impact will be significant," said 
Dolores Delaney, president of ttie Viiftala Beack 
Council of PTA's. "As far as affecting akohd in the 
schools, the new law won't do anything. Perhaps it will 
deter some, but in reality, you just can't legislate 
Aiorality. Those who want to drink are going to be able 
to, no matter what the law is. We've made the speed 
limit 55, but it hasn't kept people frGm going ovet 55, 
has it? . , ,,r , ,; . 



'*i 



^Perhaps it will deter some, but 
in reality, you just can't legislate 
morality. Those who want to drink 
are going to be able to, no matter 
what the law is." - Virginia Beach 
Council of PTA 's President Dolores 
Delaney 

"By and large, the bMt^fiMtnof?£he bill is the 
inclusion of a mandatory altiMni^daq^on class in the 
high schools," Delaney continued. "Substance abuse 
is an epidemic problem in 'Virginia Beach and across 
the country. Kids are subject to iMnMfue pressure. We 
would be well served to begMfr^ei^hiQMingt them as early 
as possible, maybe even in kindergarten. 

"The bottcHn line," DdMetf.icoaoluded, "is that 
people are dying because of isHaoMfod drug related 
accidents." An answer, she said, is raising the drinking 
age to 21 years-dd. 

Lillian DeVinney, chairperscm of Virginia Beach 
Mayor Louis R. Jones' task force on drunk driving and 
vice president for the Virginia Beach Chapter of Many 
Against Drunk Driving, questioned the new law. 

"I'm not too convinced changing 
the drinking age to 19 is going to 
make significant reductions in 
highway fatalities, " Lillian DeVin- 
ney, chairperson of Mayor's Task 
Force on Drunk Driving 

"Fm not too convmiEedchajiigiiig the'dnhlohgage to" 
19 is going to make significant reducticMis in highway 
fatalities," she said. "MADD had hc^ed that the 



legislature would change the age to 21 off-premises 
across the boards. With this law, we are not gdng to 
see a significant change in the rate of highway 
fatalities." 

tKVinney admitted that this legislation discriminates 
against 18 year-dds. "If the government has said the 
age of ma^ity is 18, to say thou shah not drink beer is 
very unfair," she said. "All drunk driving cannot be 
attributed to one age group. If we raised the age of 
majority to 21 across the boards it would be fine with 
me. As it stands, though, the law is very ambiguous. 

"It is going to take 10 years of constant pressure on 
the state government before we make any real progress 
in reducing drunk driving deaths," DeVinney con- 
tinued. "We have to raise the public awareness and 
make people believe that drinking and driving is taally 
unacceptable. We have to ask for stronger laws against 
those who drink and drive. We have to see support from 
the judges, which we are n« seeing now. People are 
not gdng to stop drinking and driving until they 
honestly believe they will get their driver's licenses 
suspended. 

"1 lost my daughter to a drunk driver; he's still 
drinking and he's still driving," DeVinney said. "And I 
know that even $he wouldn't want this new law as it 
is." 

Alt Ricla, owner of Blue Pete's seafood restaurant on 
t-kxth Muddy Qeek Road and president of the Virginia 
Beach Restaorant Assodatlon, called the legislation, 
"absurd." 



"It used to that an 18 year-old 
guy could drink in a casual at- 
mosphere. Now, he's going to be 
forced to get his older buddy to buy 
beer for him, and he'll have to drive 
around in his car and drink. Isn 't 
that exactly what the legislature was 
trying to avoid?" - Pat Ricks, 
president of the Virginia Beach 
Restaurant Association 

"It used to be that an 18 year-dd guy could drink in a 
casual atmosphere," said Ricks. "Now, he's going to 
be fwced to get his dder buddy to buy beer for him, 
and he'll have to drive around in his car and drink. Isn't 
that exactly what the legislature was trying to avdd? 

"Also, a young guy doesn't have a lot of money, 
right?" Ricks asked. "Suppose he oily has $3. hi a bar, 
that buys maybe two beers. But, in a store, $3 buys a 
whde six pack. This law is gdng to do more to 
contribute to drunk driving then it is to curb it." 

Ruflin, who along with his partner, Nabll Kassir, 
owns Peabody's and Rogue's in the resort section of 
Virginia Beach, predicts the chane in law will have 
negative effects. 

"Instead of keeping drunks off the road, this new law 
is KOtng to put more of them on the road," he said. 
."Befprethe law was changed, 18 year-olds were in a 



contrdled environment. ?^k>w, they're just gdng to get 
their 19 year-dd friends to buy their beer and they'll be 
out on the streets cruising, llie law pushes them back 
out into their cars." 



"When the new law goes into ef- 
fect, we're going to lose hundreds 
of thousands of dollars. Beside my 
personal losses, the city's going to 
lose some tourists, and there will be 
a loss of jobs and tax revenues. " - 
Ed Ruffin, Virginia Beach night- 
club owner 

At Peabody's, more than 50 percent of his clientele is 
18 years dd, Ruffin said. "When the new law goes into 
effect, we're gdng to lose hundreds of thousands of 
ddlars," he said. "Besides niy personal losses, the 
city's gdng to lose some tourists, and there will be a 
loss of jobs and tax revenues. 

"1 believe the lawmakers were sincere in their 
attempt to do something about the carnage on our 
highways," said Ruffin. "But I don't think you can 
target one segment of the peculation for this problem. 
The legislature had to pass this bill to make them look 
like they were taking a big stand." 

Ruffin concluded: "I don't think this law vnll make 
one bit of difference in alcdid-related traffic acd- 
dents." 

Those Who Supported Bill 

Del. Julie Smith, a democrat, said her vde 
supporting the bill, "was not one that I'm too proud 
of." Said Smith: "I think we moved too fast on this 
legislation. Maybe we should have waited until next 
year befwe making a change." 



"/ wasn't too comfortable with 
the bill, but I could see that the pros 
outweighed the cons . . . I suspect 
this question is going to come up 
again next year and if it does, a lot 
of people who supported it will now 
have second thoughts. I may be one 
of them" - Delegate Julie Smith 

Sm^ih agreed with the original bill submitted by the 
House, which moved the age to 21 years-dd. "I wasn't 
too comfortable with it, but I could see where the pro's 
outweighed the crai's. The thing that really convinced 
me to go with it was the statistics which showed the 
high rate of teen deaths invdying alcohd. When the 
ijfll came back at 19, 1 didn't know what to do. 

"In the l^siative- process, you ieam that if you are 
going to survive in Richmond, you better damn well 
stick by your guns," Smith continued. "I suspect this 




— *^ 

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Art Program 

Schools In National Ed. Study 



The Virgnia Beach 
Public Schools art 
program has been chosen 
to participate in a national 
art education study 
prepared by the J. Paul 
Getty Trust's Center for 
Education in the Arts. A 
total of seven art 
education programs of 
public schools in the 
United States were selec- 
ted as exemplary and 
scheduled for visits by a 
research team from the 
Getty Trust and the Rand 
Corporation. 



A national search was 
made late last year for art 
programs that provide 
comprehensive instruction 
in the regular curriculum, 
including the elements of 
art history, criticism, and 
studio production. The 
Virginia Beach program 



was recommended by the 
Virginia Department of 
Education. 

In January, Dr. Brent 
Wilson, author, resear- 
cher, and professor at 
Penn State University, 
visited Virginia Beach 
schools to determine if the 
program merited inclusion 
in the project. Shortly 
thereafter, in his letter to 
Stephena Runyan, art 
coordinator of Virginia 
Beach Public Schools, 
Wilson said he had written 
his fellow researchers that 
"a study of your program 
is a must." 

He added, "The work 
you are doing could 
provide an important 
exemplary model useful to 
the entire field of art 
education." 

Wilson and a Rand 
Corporation research 
analyst will begin their 
study of the art program 



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in Virginia Beach schools < 
the week of February 28- 
March 4. While Wilson 
studies the art activities in 
detail and highlights areas 
of particular interest, a 
Rand researcher will ex- 
plore issues associated 
with initiating, im- 
plementing, and 
sustaining the art program 
within the school system. 

The Getty Center of 
Education in the Arts will 
publish the results of its 
research projwt in 1984 
and make them available 
to Klucators, school per- 
sonnel, and the general 
public. 

Runyan said, "They are 
looking at programs that 
incorporate concepts of 
teaching ari as well as the 
use of products. Our 
curriculum qualifies." 

She also said that the 
case study will include 
examining why the 
Virginia Beach program is 
such a positive one. 
"They'll be looking for 
the things that make it 
work, and we'll be glad to 
show them." 



question is going to ccwnc up again next year and if it 
does, a lot of the people who suppwted it will now have 
second thoughts. I may be one of them." 

Del. W.R. "Buster O'Brien, a republican, said he 
supported the bill to. "get drunk drivers off the road 
and to make the roads safer. 

"This was a good compromise," O'Brien continued. 
"We can objectively defend it. Personally, 1 thought it 
was a pditically attractive thing to support and that is 
why it succeeded." 



"This was a good compromise. 
We can objectively defend it. I 
thought it was a politically attrac- 
tive thing to support and that is why 
it succeeded," - Delegate W. R. 
"Buster" O'Brien 

Will the law work? "I think so," said O'Brien. "It 
will succeed in two ways. Number one, there is the 
mandatory alcohd education class, and that is bound to 
dosome good. Second, if you are caught drinking under 
age now, your driver's license can be taken away for up 
to 30 days. That's bound to deter some people.'' 

Del. J.W. "Billy" CBrien, a democrat, said he is 
"quite willing to live with the neW law," although he 
would rather have seen the {purchase age for 
off-premises consumption of beier raised to 21 
years-dd. O'Brien has long advocated a change to 19 
for beer-buying because, he said, "li year-dds in high 
schod have no business drinking beer. It is very 
disruptive to the educational process. 



"I've worked with kids for over 
30 years. Kids are going to drink no 
matter what. If we really wanted to 
deter drinking, maybe we should 
have raised the age to 26." - 
Delegated W. "Billy" O'Brien^ 

"I've worked with kids for 30 years," said the former 
football coach at Great Bridge High Schod in 
Chesapeake. "Kids are gdng to drink no matter what. 
If we really wanted to deter drinking, maybe we should 
have raised the age to 26." 

0|Brien said he does not expect to see a significant 
decline in alcdid-related car accidents Because of the 
legislatiai. "The real culprit there," he said, "is the 
conveniences stores. We're gdng to have to do 
something about them." 

"lean accept this law and hope that it works," said 
Del. dean B. McQanan, a democrat. "I hope that if 
nothing else, it sends a signal to all Virginians that the 
state is serious when it says it doesn't approve of 
drinking and driving." 

"I can accept this new law and 
hope that it works. I hope thdt if 
nothing else, it sends a signal to all 
Virginians that the state is serious 
when it says it doesn't approve of 
drinking and driving." - Delegate 
Glenn B. McClanan 

McQanan said he was reluctant to support the bill at 
first because he has "a hard time supporting anything 
that alters substantially the rights of individuals." 
Upai being exposed to statistics presented by MADD 
and others, however, McQanan decided to suppo-t the 
change. "I fiilly recognize the value of each and every 
life, and this was a way of maybe saving some lives." 

McClanan was uncertain of the impact the law will 
have on reducing alcdid-related acddents. "I ht^e it 
has a big effect, but being candid, I'm just not sure it 
will ," he said. "U's all up to the attitudes of the 
individuals, and I think the schods and the media are 
gdng to be more meaningful in making changes that 
the new law will be." 

Sen. A. Joseph Canada, Jr., who also supported the 
bill, could not be reached. 



JMU Speaker 

Butswinkas Is Tops 



Dane Butswinkas of 
Virginia Beach, a senior at 
James Madison Univer- 
sity, has been named the 
top speaker at the U.S. 
Naval Academy In- 
vitational Debate Tour- 



CfBtonmi pn i mm vf fnff^, km cost 

OFFSET NEIVSP4ra» 
kndClKULMIS 






BYEKLYPWUCATMHS 



cgi62y-^g0ftf » i iiMM 



nament held recently in 
Annapolis. 

The award was ^pt- 
swinkas' third top in- 
dividual award of the 
year. 

The JMU team of But- 
swinkas and senior Shelly 
James were named co- 
champions of the tour- 
nament along with the 
JMU team of freshmen 
Brian James and Beth 
Gray. The JMU teams 
were the last two 
remaining teams after the 
elimination rounds, and 
rather than debate »ch 
other, the teams were 
named co-champions by 
tournament offldals. 



MICHAEL F. 

FASANARO, JR. 

AUwrncf 
AlUw 

461-6121 

S K(^er E3m:»tive Center 

surrE22o 
Norfolk, Va. 2^ 



ma 



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4 Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 1983 



Vir3inia Beach Happeninss This Week 



Send your kappeninp lo Tke Virginta 
Beach Sun, 138 S. Rmcmonl Road, 
Virgiaia Beach. Va. 23452. 



Wednesday 

Olls/lxMlit At Octtanfroiif 

Ann M. Virga, Virginia Beach resident and a 
student of Fine Arts at ODU, will exhibit her most 
recent works in oil in a one-person show at the 
Oceanfront Area Library in Virginia Beach during 
the month of March. 

Her show is entitled "An Exploration in 
Color". She accomplished the works during the 
summer of 1982 while in Maine, and it was her in- 
tention to "use a new and fresh palette putting 
aside my usual and comfortable colors". The 
exhibit will be open during the normal operating 
hours of the library. 

Thursda y 

ChHwI flhow At LyBMhowH Jr* 

The Virginia Chapter of Young Audiences has 
announce the following Virginia Beach perfor- 
mance: 

Thursday, March 3: "Bruce Lee" at Lynnhaven 
Elementary School, 210 Dillon Drive. 



OffflM 



ft 



The Virginia Beach Campus of Tidewater 
Community College is holding auditions for the 
play, "Dark of the Moon," in B-lOO from 12:30 
to 1 :30 p.m. on Thursday, March 3. 

The comedy-drama about love and witchcraft in 
the Ozarks calls for 15 to 20 men and women from 
18 to 50 years of age. Guitar and banjo players 
also are needed. Wally Doyle is the director. 

For more information, contact TCC's 
Humanities Division, 427-3070, ext. 148. 

Frida y 

•i v« BloMi At WmmSunkLm Mall 



The American Red Cross Bloodmobile will 
coltecttftood'on Fliday, March 4 from 4 to 8 p.m. 
at Sears, mall entrance, Pembroke Mall. 

■■ o o *M> hl to At TCC 

The Bloodmobile will be at the Virginia Beach 
Campus of Tidewater Community College on the 
patio behind Building D from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on 
Friday, March 4, and Monday, March 7. 

For more Information, contact Student Ac- 
tiviUcs, 427-3070, ext. 139. 

CMMMrth PlhM ••# 

The Academy of Prepared Childbirth and 
Parent Education will present three Alms related 
to childbirth and care of the newborn baby on 
Friday, March 4 at 7:30 p.m. at the Virginia Beach 
General Hospital: 

AvdMoM At K»M|Mirlll« 

The Performing Arts Unit of the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and Recreation has to an- 
nmince the auditions for "The Prime of Miss Jean 
Brodie" on Friday, March 4 from 7 to 9 p.m. and 
on Saturday, March 5 from 6 until 10 p.m. at the 
Kempsville Playhouse, located in the 
VBRC/Kem|»viUe. 

Saturday 



Lawrence G. Rice and Susan K. Weatherholt, 
Virginia Beach financial planning consultants, will 
conduct an intensive one-day financial planning 
and investment strategy seminar on Saturday, 
March 5 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. in the Ocean- 
front Area Library. 



"Thumbelina" and "Susie, the Little Blue 
Coupe" will be shown in a movie program for 
children three years of age and older on Saturday, 
March 5, at 2 p.m. in the Kempsville Area Library 
in Virginia Beach. 

Parents and children may Irarn more about the 
films by calling the library at 495-1016. 

MnS BMMnt At LyMNM VMI mmm 

Virginia Beach City Council members will be 
among those who will participate in a fund raiser 
at Lynnhaven Mall for the Tidewater Chapter 
National Multiple SclerxKis Society. 

Participants will be "arrested" and their release 
will be secured by raising $100 by asking friends or 
associates to donate between SIO and $25 dollars 
to MS. 

The event will take place on Saturday, March 5, 
beginning at 10 a.m. 

For more information call 490-9627. 

Sunda y 



V 



A salute to Frank Sinatra, conducted by 
Virginia Beach musician Eric Stevens, will be held 
on SuiKlay, March 6 at 2:30 p.m. at the Kemps- 
ville Rarreation CxaXtx. 

The concert is free and open to the pubUc. 

Call 481-7792 w 495-1892 for more infor- 
mation. 



The Philadelphia College of Bible Trombone 
Ensemble and Brass Ensemble will present a 
sacied concert at the Virginia Beach Community 
Chapel, locatKl at 1261 Laskin Road, on Sunday, 
March 6 at 8:30 and 1 1 a.m. 

The public is invited. This appearance by the 
Brass Ensemble is part of a concert tour of South 
Carolina, Maryland, Virginia, Georgia, Florida 
and Pennsylvania. All members of these musical 
groups are students at Philadelphia College of 
Bible. 

Monda y 

Mtms L«ct«ff« Por DkilMticf 

The Tidewater Chapter of the American 
Diabetes Association will hold a demonstration 
and talk on stress on Monday, March 7 at 7:30 
p.m. at Bayside Hospital, room 506. 

Dr. Errol Lebowitz of the Multi-Model Therapy 
Institute will conduct the program. 

C|dl 486-6521 for more information. 



The Independence Junior High School Band 
Parents will meet on Monday, March 7, at 7:30 
p.m. in the band room. All parents of band 
students are urged to attend. 

Call 340-5313 for more information. 

WlatM'«r«Mi Ski Trip ••t 

The Virginia Beach Department of Parks and 
Rnreation in conjunction with the Virginia 
Recreation and Park Society will sell discount 
tickets to Wintergreen Ski area for the week of 
March 7 through 20. The tickets are available only 
at the Virginia Beach Recreation Center/Kemps- 
ville. 

A group trip is planned for Friday, March 11, 
transportation is an additional $15 per person. 
Special prices are available to the public as part of 
a promotional campaign. 

For further information and prices contact 
JanisProck at 495-1892. 

Tuesda y 

Pr«« Baad Concert ••t 

A free concert by "Pocket Edition," a rock 
band, will be preetjsnted at 12:30 p.m. on Tuesday, 
March 8, In the snack bar at the Virginia Beach 
Campus of Tidewater Community College. 

For more information, contact TCC's Student 
Activities at the Virginia Beach Campus, 427- 
3070, ext. 139. 

Justin Moss, Director of Development of the 
Virginia Opera Association, will preview the 
VOA's upcoming production of Donizetti's "The 
Elixir of Love" in a lecture and discussion on 
Tuesday, March 8, at 8 p.m. in the Oceanfront 
Area Library in Virginia Beach. 

Moss has been associated with the VOA for the 
past 18 months. He came to the VOA from the 
University of California. 

Registration in advance for his workshop is 
required. Interested adults may register by contac- 
ting the library at 428-41 13. 



IMtoyTo 



At TCC 



State Senator Evelyn Hailey will speak on 
"Laws Affecting Women: Past Accomplishments 
and Future Goals" Tuesday, March 8, at 12:30 
p.m. in B-lOO at the Virginia Beach Campus of 
Tidewater Community College. 

The program, which is being presented in con- 
junction with National Women's History Week, is 
free and open to the public. 

For more information, contact TCC's Student 
Activitira, 427-3070, ext. 1 39. 



Dr. Hulbert J. Kanter, M.D. 



Announces Proven 

Cryo.siirgical Ircc/c 

I cchniqiic lor 



REDUCED PAIN 
HEMORRHOIDECTOMY 



Hubert J. Kanter, M,D„ F.A.C.S, 

Chesapeake Medical Building - 205 
(Behind Cheupeake General Hospital 

200 Medical Park way 

Chesapeake, Virginia, 23320 



547-9128 



I 



XlAl|MMRhoii#«ta 

Xi Alpha Rho Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi 
Sorority will hold its meeting on Tuesday, March 
8, 1983, in the home of Kathy DoWn's mother, 
located at 1201 Land Street. The program of the 
evening will be "Home Enieriors" presented by 
guest speaker, Sarah Patterson. Anyone interested 
in attending may call vice president Karen 
Schochteri at 468-6547. 

VImoa WIvM M««t 

The USS Carl Vinson Lnlisled Wives Club will 
hold its monthly meeting on the second Tuesday 
of every month a( 7 p.m. at the NOB Ship and 
Shore Building. 

Babysiiting is available. For more information 
call 424-6039 or 1 -874- 1 720. 

Coplag WMi ttroks 

The Stroke Club will meet in the Physical 
Therapy gym at Virginia Beach General Hospital 
on Tuesday, March 8, at 4 p.m. Terry Jenkins, 
Ph.d., Geriatrics Specialist at Comprehensive 
Mental Health, will speak on "Communication 
with Ourselves and with Others." 

W% A* MFOMI#li PfSSAHt Bkit 

The GFWC Princess Anne Woman's Club of 
Virginia Beach will meet on Tuesday, March 9 at 
1 1 a.m. at Tandom's Pine Tree Inn. 

U pcomin g 



The Ladies Auxiliary, Fleet Reserve 
Association, Kempsville Unit 99 will hold its mon- 
thly meeting on Wednesday, March 9, at 8 p.m., 
at the Eagles Lodge, 1061 Newtown Road, 
Virginia Beach. 




The PerformingiArts Unit of the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and Recreation has announ- 
ced the performance of "Jack and the Beanstalk" 
by the Parks and Recreation Puppets on Saturday, 
March 12, 4983, at 11 a.m. at the Kempsville 
Playhouse located in the Virginia Beach 
Recreation Center-KempsvUle. Admission is free. 
For further information call the Performing Arts 
Unit at 495-1892. 



•OPWi 



The GFWC Ocean Park Woman's Club will 
hold it's regular meeting on Wednesday, March 9 
at 1 1 a.m. in the club room of the Fire Depar- 
tment. 



The Tidewater Afghan Hound club and its 
Virginia Beach members will sponsor a special 
program on heartworms and other internal 
parasites by Dr. Gray Eubanks D.V.M. at its next 
monthly meeting to be held on Wednesday, March 
9 at 8 p.m. at Oakdale Presbyterian Church. 

The church is located across from Southern 
Shopping Center on Little Creek Road in Norfolk. 



Most UnmnAwn 

The Beach Suburban Republican Woman's 
Club will hold Its luncheon meeting on Wed- 
nesday, March 9 at 11:30 a.m. at the Ocean Island 
House, 3174 Page Avenge. The guest speakers will 
be The Honorable William R. "Buster" O'Brien 
and The Honorable A. Joseph Canada, Jr. 

Reservations must be made by noon Monday, 
March 7. 428-3163 or 340-5633. 

Solar SoMlnor S«t 

The Virginia Beach architectural firm the 
Design Collaborative will present a solar seminar 
on Wednesday, March 9 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at 
Tandom's Pine Tree Inn on Virginia Beach 
Boulevard.. 



Pox 



"Animal Doctor" columnist Dr. Michael W. 
Fox will speak at thed SPC A annual .nj^eting 
Wednesday, March 9, at 8 p.m. in the Cape.Henry 
Collegiate School auditorium. 




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Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 1983 5 



Vir3inia Beach Sun Hews 



^ 



General Assembly Passes Resolution 



Safety Officials Fishing For Hunter Safety In Public Schools 



' ByGr^Gpldfarb 
^ SunEditor 

There may be up to 10,000 hunters in Virginia 
Beach, who, between July 1, 1^1 and June 30, 
1982, purchased over 13,000 hunting licenses at a 
total cost of $96,302. These figures are reported 
by Wallace Hoiibobs, ^ctUent, Virginia BcKk 
Safety CoaacU. 

Further, Tunmons reports, since 1961 there 
have been only two hunting fatalities and 11 
hunting related accidents in Vngimii Beach. 

But even though \%ginia Beach hunting deaths 
and accidents are not occuring at an alarming 
rate, efforts have heen underway, locally and 
statewide, to prcmott hunting safety education in 
public school systenu. 

This past session, the Virginia General 
Assembly passed House Joint Resolutioi 23, 
requesting the State Department of Education, 
with the aid of the Yirginia Oofnmission of Game 
and Inland FislMfies, to encourage hunter 
education in public schools. The measure was 
introduced by RowMkc Delegate Victor Ihomas, 
(D), and passed by a voice bote in both the Senate 
and the House. 

The approved resolution is not law, but does 
call fOT increased statewide emphasis in the area 
of hunter safety education. 

In Virginia Beach, where hunting is not as 
pojpulai as in some more western regions of the 
state, the question of hunter safety education is 
greeted with mixed reactions. 

"I don't think that it should be compulswy," 
said Virginia Beach attorney Gtenn Qoshaw, who 
is also a commiMiOBer, Znd Congressional 
District, ViifiBla Conuntesiw of Game and Inland 
Fislieries. "As a voluntary measure it's extraordi- 
nary." 



Ideally, Croshaw envisions hunter safety educa- 
tion included, in sane way, in the Virginia Beach 
public school system, in order to present the issue 
to "a broader number of people," he said. 
After-h(»jrs seminars don't tend to attrract a great 
number of peqjle, he said, and he would "feel 
very good" about seeing hunter safety taught in 
six-week increments in the schools during study 
hall. Other alternatives include conducting a 
program at local churches, recreation centers, or 
t^her public facilities. 

*7/i the arena of education 
throughout the country, we have at- 
tempted to do too much . . . we 
should stick to the things we do 
best" -Walter Carroll 

Since Oct., 1980, accoding to Virginia Beach 
Game Warden Diant Thompson, the Virginia 
Department of Game and Inland Fisheries has 
reached over 454 Virginia Beach hunters with its 
hunter safety programs. 

The costs of the program, when conducted by 
the game conmission, is paid by game conmis- 
sicm revenues generated from hunting, boating, 
and fishing license fees. The commission also 
pays the cost of materials and instructors. 
Not A New Idea 

According to Virginia Beach public school 
officials, the question of including a hunter safety 
program or classes in the public schoc^ arose four 
CH- five years ago, but no action was taken and the 
issue has since rested. 

Now, however, a renewed interest in the 



question haa been fostered as the state level, and 
locally the Virginia Beach Safety Qnincil is trying 
to qptn discussions with public school officials 
over including hunter safety education on school 
grounds. ' 

"We want to explore with them some . 
possibilities of what we could do in the area of 
hunter safety," said Tlmmons. Timmons would 
like to see hunter safety taught either on a 
voluntary basis for students, or in health and 
physical education classes. Timmons also said if 
he couldn't formally introduce hunter safety 
education on schod grounds, he would like to 
have the option of disseminating flyers on school 
grounds- announcing any upcoming hunter safety 
programs. 

Walter Carroll, assistant superintendent for 
instructional services, Vlifinia Beach Public 
Schools, said no one has contacted him about the 
hunter safety question. 

Carroll said that if the state ever passed 
legislation madating hunter safety education in 
public schools, that of course, "we will follow the 
law." 

He added, however, that absent any state 
mandated legislation, "I have no plans right now 
for such a thing or to make a recommendaticm to 
the school board." 

He said it may be possible to circulate 
informational flyers on upcoming hunter safety 
classes throughout the public school system. 

Carrdl notes that if hunter safety education is 
included in the schools, some other academic 
discipline woild most likely have to be dropped. 

"It's a matter of priorities," he said. 

"In the arena of education throughout this 
country," Carrdl coitinued, "we have attempted 
to do too much... We should stick to the things we 
do best." 




Virginia Beach hunters Pete and 
Lettie Dozier agree that hunter 
education is important to hunter 
safety 



Student Creative Writing 



The foflowtai nwki Mf kgr 
Dabacy. 



^ I Know A Wild Animal 

I know a wild animal 

who is a camiibai. - 

It is a tiger. 

His name is Stiger. 

And his last name is Hannimal. 



ito at Indian LakM Elementary School. The princM 1* Mn. OHvta 



My Room 



When you come to my room at night. 

You can see the soft moonlight. 

It is not bright. 

Cause it has no light. 

It is such a sight. 

But it still has no light. 



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The Iwo poems above are by Lynn Johnson, I, daughter of 
Leslie and Bill Johnson. Karen Jackobs' third grade class. 

Roller Rink 

Children skating everywhere, 

Music blasting in the air. 

Falling, tripping, eating, drinking, 

All the things you do while you're skating. 

Shouting, screaming, the roar of the crowd. 

See the people falling down at the roller rink. 

By Fdkia Rivera, II. daughter of Santiago and Maivuerile 
Bivera. Mn. Joann DelCarman's sixth grade claM. 



Orange, Red For Protection 

Continued from Page 1 

1978, 152; 1979, 135; 1980, 152; 1981, 197; and 
1982, 201. The lO-year average fw deer killed in 
Virginia Beach is 98 per year. 

During the 1982-'83 deer hunting season, 
hunters bagged 134 bucks and 64 does for a total 
of 198 deer killed. 

Deer, rabbit and quail hunting seasons have 
ended in Virginia Beach. But in her three years as 
a game warden in Virginia Beach, Thompson has 
seen many hunting activities and knows many 
hunters; and for the hunters' safety, she favors the 
use of blaze orange. 

"If I were a deer hunter I'd wear it so I'd be 
more highly visible by the hunters in the area, and 
not apt to be mistaken for game," she said. 

"But I think it's scxnething that should be left 
up to the legiflatOTs," she continued. 



The Lochness 

It goes up and down 
And all around. 
It twists and turns 
From the sky to the ground. 
It does astound. 

By Cheryl'^WIIIcox. 11, daughter of Blair and June Wlkox. 
Mrs. Joann DelCarman's sixth (trade class. 

The Beach 

At the beach there are people laughing, 

And waves crashing. 

There are fish there that are smelling. 

And people yelling. 

And 1 have to admit, 

That's the way I like it. 

By Chris McShanc, 1 1 , son of Ronald and Cheryl Hole. Mrs. 
loann DelCarnian's sixth grade class. 

When A Rainbow Forms 

Everytime after the rain a rainbow forms. 
It's like someone colored the world. 
AH the grass is greener, all the sky is bluer. 
The red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo. 
And violet brightens up the world! 

By Stacy Streit, II, daughter of SUn and Dodie Streit. Mrs. 
Joann I>elCarman's sixth grade class. 



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I wish I were a giant butterfly 

To fly and flutter across the sky . 

To show my beauty as I eat and 

Land upon my giant leaf. 

In the fall I cocoon myself and 

Hang down from the branches shelf. 

In the spring I open up 

And see all the baby pups. 

Then I mate. 

And then I die. 

I hope to go into the heavenly sky. 

By Sieve Mastenon, 10, son of Marlene and Bill Mastefson. 
Mr. Steve ScarccHI's nflh grade class. 



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Rotarians 
Honor \ 
Roche I 

Diane C. Rothe, Fire 
Education Specialist for 
the Virginia Beach Fire 
Department, has been ' 
selected 1982 City Lni 
ployee of the YeJtr. by the ; 
Virginia Beach Rotary 
Club. ? 

This is the third year the : 
club has selected an out- 
standing municipal em- : 
ployee based on 
nominations from the ; 
public and fellow em- 
ployees. Previous winners : 
have b*en Richard - 
Branich of Parks and ' 
Recreation and Billy 
Ballou of the Circuit , 
Court. 

According to infor- : 
mation in the nomination 
documents, Diane Roche 
was hired in 1976 to 
develop and present a fire : 
safety education program 
to fifth grade students. 
Because of her dedication, 
efforts and supervision 
"Virginia Beach now has 
one of the best fire safety ; 
education programs in the [ 
country." 

Roche, who has A 
Bachelor of Science degrcd 
in Education from Illinois 
State University, has art, 
impressive list of national 
affiliations including the 
National Fire and Burn 
Education Association, 
the National Fire 
Academy, the National 
Fire Protection Assoc!-; 
ation, the International 
Society of Fire Service In- 
structors, and the U.S.' 
Fire Administration. Irt 
1981 she was named Out-^ 
standing Fire Educator ofr 
the Year by the U.S. Fire; 
Administration. 

In addition to her duties.: 
in Virginia Beach, Roche^ 
has spoken at more thanf 
50 Fire Service conferen-* 
ces in 23 states, outlining* 
the outstanding fire safety* 
programs of the City off 
Virginia Beach. j 

The Rotary Club award! 
will be proented to Rochel 
at a special banquet in her| 
honor at the Pavilion onS 
Thursday. March 3, 1983. |: 




MMiM 









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6 Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 1983 



A'"». 



Virsinia Beach City Council Byuecahiii 



Beach Council A ctions 



Join A. Baiin 
Blackwalcr 



Nucy A. Creech 
Al-Lar|c 



M 



HareM Hcifchobcr 
A(-Lar|te 



H.JackJeMings 
Lynnhivcn 



Louis R. Jones 
Bayside 






Robert G. Joae* 
Al-Larie 



W. H. KUcUn, lU 
VifgiaiaBcKh 



RetaS.McClanaB 

PriflCCHAlM 



J. Henry McCoy, Jr. 
Kempsvilic 



Mcyera Oberndorf 
Al-Large 



A drainage brieTint was presented to Council By Don True- 
blood, city engineer. 



Council directed city manager to respond to request of Mrs. 
Joyce Campbell of the Aragoiu Civic League, regarding the 
parking of city school buses on city streets. 



Councilman McCoy suggested that an ordinance on the for- 
mal agenda, code section 38-6 (purchase of weapons) be 
deferred for further study by the staff lo address the concerns 
of the public. 



Councilman Creech aanouiuxd the bid openings for Rose 
H»ll-Et««eis Land Home wiU be on Wednesday. M«rch 2. 

J^wMNWlC AVMMM 

Councilman Kitchin asked the city manager to nuke recom- 
mendations conceraMg parking pniblems OH Atlantic Avenue. 



Councilman Jennings advised that he would sponsor Mr. 
James Roebuck chairman of the Arts and Humanities Com- 
mission, who will speak to Council under new business concer- 
ning the Virginia Orchestra Group. 



Meeting Date, Monday, February 28, 1983; Absent: L. Jones, R. McClanan 

^ Ttffnrrnnl C/>CCI/)M 'Resolution approving the issuance of Industrial Develop- 

W 1 rlj UrfriUl OChJOI C/Af ment Revenue Bond to JAY-CEE Properties in the amount of 

$275,000. Approved, 9-0. 

•Resolution approving the issuance of Industrial Develop- 
ment Revenue bond to Steven L. McCleaf and Shirley W. Mc- 
Cleaf in the amount of S600,000. Approved. 9-0. 

•Resolution approving the issuance of Industrial Develop- 
ment Revenue Bond to AREA Corporation in the amount of 
$5,000,000. Approved, 9-0. 

•Resolution approving the issuance of Industrial Develop- 
ment Revenue Bond to John W. Harris and Associates 111 in 
the amount of $725,000. Approved. 9-0, 

Coiis«iiff Agenda 

•Resolution in Recognition to Vernon Ferebee. Approved, 
9-0. 

•Resolution authorizing the City Manager to execute a license 
agreonent with Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company 
in Older to construct a water line acro s s i ts fi ght of w a y-i 
provide City Water service to a parcel of properly on Lynn- 
haven Parkway. Approved, 9-0. 

•Ordinance to Amend and Reordain Section 38-6 of the 
Code of the City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, pertaining to the 
Permits for Purchase of Certain Weapons. Deferred 90 days to 
allow city manager to confer with public, by 9-0 vote. 

•Ordinance on second reading to appropriate funds of $547 
to the PoHce Department and increase estimated revenues in 
the General Fund. Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance on first reading to appropriate funds of 
$1,688,828 to esUblish a School Textbook Rental Fund FY 
1982-83 Budget. Approved, 9-0. 

•Ordinance to transfer Capital Project Funds of $300,000 
from the Chesapeake Beach Drainage Project (C.I. P. 2-817) to 
the Development of Independence and Buckner Boulevards 
(C.I.P. 2-995). Deferred, by 9-0 vote, one week. 

•Ordinance to transfer $465,600 within the Community 
Development Program. Deferred, by 9-0 vote, indefinitely. 

•Ordinance to Transfer Capital Project Funds of $64,935 
from Project 12-817 - Chesapeake Beach Drainage to Project 
n-832 Wesleyan Drive. Approved, 9-0. 

•Ordinance to transfer funds of $106,879 within the Erosion 
Commission Budget for the Beach Replenishment Program. 
Approved, 9-0. 

•Ordinance approving the terms and conditions of an 
agreement for certain voter election equipment between the city 
of Virginia Beach and Computer Election Systems: 
Authorizing the city manager to execute the approved 
agreement; authorizing the city manager to implement and 
carry out the terras of the approved agreement. Approved, 9-0. 

•Ordinance closing, vacating and discontinuing a IS-foot 
alley locat»i between Atlantic Avenue and Myrtle Avenue, 
north of 46th Street in the petition of Claud P. Brownley, III; 
Tren L. Brownley; and Bernice Leonard (Lynnhaven Borough) 
Approved, 9-0. 

•(^dinance to authorize the acquisition of property in fee 
simple fcMT rights-of-way for Queen City sewer/water sewer im- 
provements project and the acquisition of temporary and per- 
manent easements of right-of-way, either by agreement or by 
condemnation. Approved, 9-0. 

•Proposal submitted by Minnesco Division of 3M Cor- 
poration for lease/purchase of a microfilm camera and reader/ 
'printer for police/ records at an annual percentage rate of 
9.43^; and, authorize the city numager to enter into the 
necessary agreements for this lease/purchase. Approved, 9-0: 

•Request of the city treasurer for tax refunds in the amount 
of $491 .99. Approved. 9-0. 

•Request of the commissioner of revenue for license refunds 
in the amount of $680.77. Approved, 9-0. 



Giles G. Dodd and Thomas Muehlenbeck were complimen- 
ted by Council for thdr Interim Financial Statement, presented 
to Council by Dodd. 



The city manager reported (Mi cooperative efforts for tran- 
sportation between the WatersMe in Norfolk and the ocean- 
front through TRT. 



if Formal Session 



•Comunity Development Funds and Program Income was 
continued to Mar. 7 by 7-0 vote. Absent, Baum; abstaimng, 
Heischober. 

•Lifeguard Sovice and Beach Franchise Areas I, 2 and 3. 
Three bids were recdved (mi Area 1 from North Beach Service. 
Ocean Rescue Squad, Service. Inc., and Virginia Beach 
Patrol, Inc. Three bids were recdved on Am 2 from Ocean 
Rescue Squad Service, Inc., a contingent bid from Ocean 
Rescue Squad Servjce, Inc.. and Virginia Beatcfa Patrol. Inc. 

•Coundlwoman Cteech read a statement on behalf of the 
sbucommittee appdnted to oversee progress of the Virginia 
Museum of Marine Sciences at the 1983 General Assembly. 
The General AssonMy allocated $2 million for the cmistruction 
of the facility. 



if Presentation 



•Vernm Foebee • Dedicated City Employee; and 
•Clyde N. Merritt - Retiring City Assosor, both approved, 9 
-0. 



ir Resolutions 



it Planning Items 



•Reac^utkm appttmi^ the issuance of Industrial Devdop- 
ment Revenue Bond in the amount of $4,500,000 to Ex- 
l^essway Motel Assodales. Apprwed, 90. 

•Resolutimi approvii^ the issuaiKC of Industrial Develop- 
ment Revenue Bond to Columbus Street Auodates in the 
amount of $3,800,000. Approved, 9-0. 

•Resolution approving the inuanoe of Industrial Develop- 
ment Revenue Bond to Thaha Carpel and Drapoy Shop, Inc. 
in the amowt of $300,000. ^^inoved 9-0. 

•Resohtfton approvi^ the issuance of Industrie Devdop- 
meat Revenue Bond to Tower Enterprises in the amount of 
$600,000. A^iroved 94. 

•lUMliMkn apfiremat the tewnce of Industrial Dcwetop- 
moit Revome Bond to Sjftcxm Oxfiot^iioa is the amovnt of 
$S.'»O.O0O. Apptmti 94i. ^ 



Ordiiuuux to amend and reordain Article 2, Section 200 (c) 
of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance pertaining to Lou of 
unusual depth; deferred for two weeks by 8-0 vote, Creech ab- 
sent; and ordinance to amend and reordain Article 9, Section 
901 (a) of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
use regulations in the B-1 Business-Residential District. Ap- 
proved, 8-0. Jetmings absent. 

See VIRGINIA, Page 7 




MARGO 

AMERICAN 

PALMIST 



F*oHffingpeim. physic and lil« r«odings. Sotiifocfioo 
guarani««d Prices within f»ach <A oil. Advic* on 
business, health and morrioge. Seek the help of Morgo 
lodoy, your problem* will be m^vmd. lucky doy* or»d 
numbers wMi reccing. Wtorgo hat been locoted in the 
Tidewater <mo far SOyeor*. Hm oatwiahed many with 
her manwIoM predictions. ^rm»ently loarted m her 
own home Raodhi^ we pfh««e w*d confkJenHol. 
Morgo is locwed in her same establishment at 
Chgrchlond, Vo. «t. 17 N. Pleaae call for appointment 
ond directions . 4t3-0S47 . Closed Mondoy. 




Beach Pops Reformation? 



> 




Continued from Page I 

formers. 

After hearing Roe- 
buck's request at the end 
of the Mcmday evening 
Onincil session, Council 
decided to wait at least a 
week until after the 
Thursday meeting of the 
VOG and, possibly, final 
dispositicm by the VOG of 
the Noona matter. 

Monday, Roebuck said 
that the Virginia Beach 
cultural (»-ganizati(m was 
in "dire danger." He said 
the "firing of Maestro 
Walter Noona is the open- 
ing salvo in the final battle 
of the long-running war to 
destroy the eminently suc- 
cessful Virginia Fops." 

A week ago Monday, 
the executive committee 
of the VOG voted with one 
dissenting vote to restruc- 
ture the organization of 
the VOG. The restructur- 
ing would reduce Noona 
in rank by removing his 
title of music directs 
which he shares with the 
Philharmonic conductor 
Richard Williams. When 
in 1979 a prq^osal was 
made to merge the Nor- 
folk Philharmonic Sym- 
phony with the Peninsula 
Symphony and the Vir- 
ginia Beach Pc^s into the 
VOG, Ncxma refused an 
offer to become the assis- 
tant conductor of the Nor- 
folk Philharmcmic, Roe- 
buck said. The obsten- 
sible purpose, he said, 
was to derive financial 
benefits of large-budget 
organizations with three 
years or more of profes- 

lat performance. 

Roebuck said that 
Noona tdd him that the 
troubles began the first 
day after the merger. The 
Peninsula symphcmy was 



renamed the Virginia 
Classical Orchestra and 
"forthwith disappeared to 
never be seen again." 

The Pops, however, did 
not share the same fate, 
but became even more 
successful than ever 
before, Roebuck said. 

While the Philharmonic 
has been "preparing the 
hall with two for ones (two 
tickets for the price of 
(Hie) to all subscribers and 
still performing to sparse 
audiences," Roebuck 
said, Nocma and the Pops 
have been packing them 
in at the PaviUon. "Sell- 
out crowds have n^aodat- 
ed the expansion of the 
seating capiacity by the 
introduction of auditorium 
seating in the rear of the 
hall." 

The reduction of Noona 
in rank means that he 
would have no authwity 
over the selectirai or dis- 
missal of his musicians. 
Also his performances 
wcxild be reduced from 
eight to five, and his 
salary cut by $10,000 ot 
mote. "It was a blatant 
insult to Maestro Walter 
Noona," Roebuck said. 
"It was a calculated insult 
to your Arts and Humani- 
ties Commissirai. It was 
an arrogant and callous 
disregard fw the wishes 
of the citizens of our 
city." 

Roebuck was allowed to 
speak at the request of 
Councilman H. Jack 
Jennings. Jr. 

Councilwoman Nancy 
Creech said that the mat- 
ter has not yet been 
resolved between Noona 
and the VOG and the 
Council should be careful 
about "involving itself in 
realms beyond our 



responsibility." 

Roebuck said that the 
Commission made its 
decisi(»i to back Noona in 
the reestablishment of the 
Virginia Beach Pc^s at a 
meeting on Saturday 
afternoon when five of the 
11 members were pre- 
sent. He said Nocma then 
told the CommissicHi of his 
plans to develop the Pops 
as before, but as a profes- 
si(Hiat group. 

Creech said that the 
VOG has not accepted 
Noona's resignaticn and 
that he had not submitted 
a written resignation. 
Noona did say after the 
VOG announcement that 
he w(Mjld quit. 

Creech said that the 
VOG was to meet Thurs- 
day to discuss the matter. 

Roebuck said that his 
commission met at noon 
on Wednesday following 
the VOG upheaval. Mem- 
bers were told, he said, 
that the VOG had no 
intentions of acceding to 
any of NoMia's demands. 

Creech suggested that 
no precipitous acticm be 
taken until the matter is 
resolved by the VOG. 

She said that it was na 
a matter of supp<Mting or 
nM supporting Noaia. "I 
went to high Schocrf with 
Mr. Noona." 



Jennings said that it 
would be highly benefidal 
if Qnincil would support 
Noona. He said there's 
"no question he's on the 
way out. He is being 
fired!" 

Qeech said that she 
considered it untoward to 
get into the middle of a 
private matter until after 
it is settled. 

Councilman Dr. J. 
Henry McCoy Jr. agreed 
saying that Council gets 
into trouble "everytime 
we do something off the 
wall." He added that he 
went to grammar school 
with Noona. 

Creech said that Coun- 
cil has heard cxily one 
side. 

Councilwoman Meyera 
OberndOTf then introduc- 
ed the letter frcmi Haynie. 
She pointed out that the 
Cranmission request was 
more out of order than the 
letter from Haynie. She 
suggested handling bcxh 
requests at the same time. 
Once Council knows 
what the final resulution 
is, Creech said. Council 
will take apprqsriate ac- 
tion. 

Vice Mayor Barbara 
Henley, presiding in the 
absence of Mayor Louis R. 
Jones, said that Mr. 

See COUNCIL, Page 7 



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Virginia B^ach Sun, March 2, I9g3 f 



Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 



Oceanf ront Franchise Bids Opened voice Of The People what should The Legal Drinking 



^ Bids onoceanfroot franchises ranging from $5,525 to 
$100,000 led the attwney fa one of the bidders to 
question the validity of the bid documents. 

Robert Cromwell, attorney for North Beach Services, 
the bidder who offered the least in franchise fees, said 
that the obvious great disparity in the bids has g« to 
indicate sane kind of failure in the documents. 

Three companies submitted bids an one or both of 
the franchises for the north and south end of the beach 
beach, roughly divided into 20 blocks each. Bids were 
opened at the 7 p.m. meeting of Council Monday 
following a brief discussicm in the informal session. No 
bids were submitted for the third franchise area. Little 
Island Beach at Sandbridge, which apparently was 
considered not economically lucrative enough for the 
bidders. The area is now patrcJled by Parks and 
Recreation Bureau personnel. 

Two of the bidders currently operate the equipment 
rental/lifeguard services under an infomal agreement 
with the city. This is the first time the qjerations have 
been up for bid. 

Ocean Rescue, Inc., which has been operating at the 
south end, submitted bids fa bah francliises. Its 
combined $175,000 bid fa the five-year franchise 
would be the highest if he were granted both franchises. 
However, Oceana Rescue submitted an alternate bid of 
$25,000 for the south end if the company were granted 
only the south-end franchise. Its bids fa the nath end 
area was $100,000, the highest of the three. Oceana 
Rescue is headed by Graham (Dusty) Hinnant, and his 
son Kent. 

hkwth Beach Service, headed by W.H. Kitchin Jr., 
who has operated the service fa 50 years, submitted a 
bid of $5,525.64 fa the five years with fees ranging 
from $1,000 fa the, first year to $1,215.51 fa the fifth 
year. Kitchin, the father of Councilman W.H. Kitchin 
in, bid oily fa the nath end franchise. 

The newcomer was Virginia Beach Patrol Inc., 
headed by E. Christopher Warell, Beach business- 
TBMn, who is president. Other officers are former High 
Constable R.R. (Buddy) McChesney, treasurer, and 
Edward C, (Ned) Kuehn, a former lifeguard, vice 
president. Edward S. Garcia serves on the conpany's 
board of directas. 

Beach Patrol submitted $75,000 bid on each 
franchise. 

Attorney Grover Wright, representing Beach Patrol, 
4^ said that the city staff did a good jobin preparing the 



specifications and maintained that Beach Patrol will 
have mae stringent contrcrfs on its operation than the 
city requires. He said the Patrol also will make 
innovations such as furnishing a marine unit offshae, 
and will own a surf rescue tod. 

He said Kuehn, who will manage the franchise, has a 
B.S. degree in recreation management from VPl-SU, 
ten years experience as a beach lifeguard, and curing 
the past five years wakcd fa Nath Beach Service. 

He said the Patrc^ will provide mae supervisay 
personnel than required in the specifications. He added 
that the public would be better served if the franchises 
were awarded to the same firm. 

Cromwell said that Kitchin has 50 years experience. 
He said that people have a false notion that there's a 
pa of gold on that beach. He asked that Council pay 
mae attention to safety than the possible income from 
the franchises. He said Council should be sure that the 
pec^le bidding are capable of perfaming and that the; 
city will not have to step in later. He said the mae 
realistic bidding of his client was based on years of 
experience. 

Councilman John A. Baum moved that the city 
manager Thomas H. Muehlenbeck take the bids under 
advisement and make recommendattions as soon as 
possible. 

Council approved the motion by a vae of 8-0 with 
Kitchin abstaining. Mayor Louis R. Jones and 
Coicil woman Re ba McQanan were absent. 

At the infamal session, Kitchin questioned sane 
aspects of the bid documents. He said he was 
concerned about its being a viable document. He said 
Tom Shell who has the concession at Sandbridge Beach 
said there was no way anycme could bid oi Little Island 
Beach under the present requirements. 

Assistant to the City Manager David Grochmal who 
was in charge of developing the franchise documents, 
said that the requirements for lifeguards were based cwi 
Parks and Recreation policy at the public beaches which 
it jjatrols. He said the franchises would have mae 
responsibility than the services have at present. 

Kitchin said that he plans to have a statement placed 
in the newspapers enumerating his ccmcerns. He said 
that the present services operate at no expense to 
taxpayers. He said that if the bidder does not have 
$200,000 to start with, he will na be in business fa five 
years. "I wouldn't even offer a bid on it," he said. 



Age Be? 




Discusses Noona 



Continued from Page 6 

Haynie also is premature 
in soHdting fimds. 

Jennings said, "Our 
group hats not gotten the 
frur shake we thought they 
would get," but went 
along with Creech's 
request to wait until next 
week to' coisider the 
matter again. 

Roebuck said tht the 
Commission does not 




PRINTING 



believe the VOG has 
negotiated with the Can- 
mission in good faith. He 
said the Commissron 
recently inquired why the 
terms of the grant fa the 
current year were not 
being met in that Noona 
and the Pops were being 
allowed only one rehear- 
sal. On Feb. 8, he said, 
officers of the commission 
and the VOG directa met. 
The directa assured the 
Commission that "our 
fears were groundless and 
that Maestro Noona was 
being taken care of." 
Thirteen days later, the 
restructuring was 
announced. 

Roebuck said the many 
on the Commissioi identi- 
fied with the VOG board 



member who said that as 
a result of the VOG vote, 
she felt "as though she 
had been ' raped and 
thrown out of the car." 

Noona's proposal, Roe- 
buck said, is for a bare- 
bones budget professional 
pops series fa 1983-84 
which requires no addi- 
tional funding from the 
city over that recommend- 
ed by the Q»nmission fa 
the Pops in the coming 
year's budget. 

The possible re- 
emergence of the Virginia 
Beach Pops has excited 
the many followers of 
Maestro Noona and the 
Pc^s. He said the number 
of perfamances would be 
the same, but the famat 
would be changed some- 



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Kanritichaig 

A Beach Swinger 

Leslie Kamitschnig of Virginia Beach, a 
member of the James M»lisan University 
women's gymnastics team, won the state inter- 
collegiate title on the uwven paiMel bars at the 
state meet held recently at Radfad University. 

The senia scaed a meet-high 9.0 points in^ 
winning the event. 

JMU placed third in the team oxnpetition. 

Kamitschnig is a graduate fd First Cdonial 
High Schod where she won regioial champion- 
ships in the uneven parallel bars and in the 
all-around as a senia. 




what during the first year. 

Endorsement of the 
revival of the Virginia 
Beach Pops, he said 
sould serve as a vote of 
confidence in Noona, a 
vae of confidence in the 
Conmission and a signal 
to the business commun- 
ity of the need for its 
support. 

Roebuck said that last 
year the Pops orchestra 
was transported to Balti- 
mae fa a guest perfam- 
ance under Nooia and 
Noona later returned as a 
guest conductor of the 
Baltimae Orchestra. He 
has been guest conductor 
in 12 maja cities and has 
signed contracts to per- 
fam as guest conducta in 
ten maja cities next year. 



"// should be 18, I 
believe, because in the 
eyes of the law, an 18 
year-old is an adult in 
every other sense of the 
word. When you're 18, 
you can be drafted and 
fight in a war. Why 
shouldn 't you be able to 
drink a beer? Changing 
the law would be 
ridiculous. " 

Patty Dingwitz 

Jewelery Clerk 

17-year resident 



"You should be able 
to drink beer when you 
are 18. What kind of 
trouble can an 18 year- 
old get into a 19 or a 21 
year-old wouldn't get in- 
to? The law has been set 
for so long, by changing 
it now they would be 
taking away privileges 18 
year-olds have gotten 
used to." 

Angle Cantrell 

Receptionist 

Four-year resident 



"// ought to be 21 
because the younger kids 
obviously don't kno^ 
how to handle any kind 
of alcohol. When you 
are 18, you are too 
young for beer. Kids get 
in more wrecks, are more 
wreckless, qnd they are 
more irresponsible. It 
would make me very 
happy for the law to be 
changed to 21. 

Mrs. ^. H. Williams 

Housewife 

35-ycar resident 



"/ really think it 
should be 21. Of course, 
I'm 21, so a change in 
the law wouldn't affect 
me. But / think the 
younger pleople can't 
handle their drinking too 
well. At 21, you are more 
mature and you know 
enough not to drink and 
drive." 

E. Rios 

Housewife 

New resident 



Virginia Beach Council Actions 



Continued from Page 6 

Comiif tonal Um 

Application of Holiday Village, Inc., by R. M. Bosher and 
R. G. Bosher, for a conditional use permit for an automobile 
service station with a convenience store and registration ofHce 
on a 28,3S7.5-square foot parcel located along the west side of 
General Booth Boulevard, south of South Birdneck Road 
(Princess Anne Borough). Approved, 8-0, Creech abstaining. 

Condittonal Mm 

Application of Douglas and Pat Perry for a conditional use 
permit for a single-family dwelling in the AG-I Agricultural 
District on a 10-acre parcel located north of London Bridge 
Road, west of Oceana Boulevard (Princess Anne Borough). 
Approved, 9-0. 

Creative Mtplayt, Inc. 

Conditional Use Permit for two 10.5' x 3l6' billboards on a 
1 7. 401 -acre parcel located along the south side of Holland 
Road, east of Rosemont Road (Princess Anne Borough); and 
Conditional tJse Permit for one 10.5' x 36' billboard on a 
I7.40l-acre parcel located along the south side of Holland 
Road, east of Rosemont Road (Princess Anne Borough): and 
Conditional Use Permit for one 10.5' x 36' billboard on a 
4.405-acre parcel located along the west side of Holland Road, 
south of Stoneshore Road (Princess Anne Borough); and Con- 
ditional Use Permit for two 12' x 25' billboards on a 2.5-acre 
parcel located along the west side of Rosemont Road, south of 
the Virginia Beach-Norfolk Expressway (Lynnhaven 
Borough). Referred to Planning Commission for review of 
Code Section 216 in consideration of adding other streets to 
those restricted in billboard ordinance, i.e., Holland Road, 
Rosemont Road and others, by 9-0 vote. 

Dii|M«x«t 

Application of Hudgins and Associates for a Conditional 
Use Permit for three duplexes on a 15,000-square foot parcel 
located on the northeast corner of Parks Avenue and 13th 
Street (Virginia Beach Borough). Approved, 9-0. 



Applications of Lewis W. and Rose S. Breedlove for a 
Change of Zoning from R-4 Residential District to O-l Ofricc 
District on an 18,443. 5-square foot parcel located on the south 
side of Wildwood Drive, east of First Colonial Road (Lyn- 
nhaven Borough). Approved, 9-0. 



Application of Wayne Beagle for a Change of Zoning from 
R-5 Residential District to R-8 Residential District on a 22,433- 
square fool parcel located along the east side of Groenwell 
Road, south of Powells Point Road (Bayside Borough). 
Denied, 8-0; R. Jones abstaining. 

DMl^d 

Application of Patrick W. Bruzzese for a variance to Section 
4.4 (b) of the Subdivision Ordinance which requires that lot 
dimensions conform to the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance. 
He wishes to subdivide a 2.647-acre parcel, located along the 
north tide of Pungo, Ferry Road, vmsi of Carmd Street, into 
two parcels, one totalling 39,334.68 square feet (.903 acre - Lot 
2- A) and the other totalling l,MJft4bit4Z.ot 2-B). A singJe- 
family residence exists on this site (Pungo Borough). Denied, 8- 
0; Jennings absent. 



if Ordinances 



Ordinance approving the terms and conditions of an 
Agreemeht for an Electrical Service Contract between the City 
of Virginia Beach and the Virginia Electric Power Com- 
pany; Authorizing and Directing the city manager to execute 
the approved agreement; and authorizing and directing the city 
manager to implement and carry out the terms and provisions 
of the approved agreement . Approved, 9-0. 



Varlaac* 



Ordinance on Tirst reading to appropriate funds of SI, 010 
for the Tidewater Builders Associatioii Scholarship House. 
Approved, 9-0. 



Application of James N. Belote for a variance to Section 4.4 
(b) of the Subdivision Ordinance which requires that lot dimen- 
sioi» conform to the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance. He 
wishes to subdivide a 1 .467-acre parcel into two lots, one of 
which will be in a "flag lot" configuration. The site is located 
along the east side of Woodstock Road, north of Providence 
Road. A single-family residence currently exisU on the site 
(Kempsville Borough). Approved, 8-0; Heischober absent. 



it Appointments 



Personnel Board appointments rescheduled to March 7. 



if New Business 



Application of the Trust of G. R. McBride by Robert G. 
McBride Trustee for a Change of Zoning from B-2 Com- 
munity-Business District to A-2 Apartment District on a 2.7- 
acre parcel located along the south side of Shore Drive, east of 
Diamond Springs Road (Bayside Borough). Approved, 8-0; 
Heischober abstaining. 



James W. Reobuck, chairman of the Arts and Humanitie* 
Commission advised CouiKil on rKcnt actions and a proposal 
for the reformation of the Virginia Beach Pops Orchestra. 
Council took no action but will review when differences with 
the Virginia Orchestra Group are resolved. 



if Adjournment 



At 10:20 p.m. Council recessed into executive session, and 
ttljourned at 10:40 p.m. 



Dates Set For Annual Boardwalk Art Show 



The dates for the 28th Annual Boardwalk Art Show, 
sponsored by the Virginia Beach Arts Center, have been 
set for June 23-27, 1983. The yearly event offers artists 
an attractive opportunity to exhibit and sell their work. 
In 1982, the show attracted more than 300,000 visitors 
over a five day period to view and purchase the work of 
over 700 artists, accepted from a field of more than 1000 
applicanU. Collectively, last year's sal« exceeded 
$500,000. 

Artists whose work meets the criteria and st 
fa entry in the juried show are encourage! tc 
There are no residents restrictions. All work 
original, created by the applicant and of prof| 
quality. Eligible catagories of work include: 
acrylics, watercolors, graphics, drawings, scUpture, 
photography, mixed m»lia, ceramics and pottery, 




creative crafts and jewelry. ^ 

The show will run continuously for 1 1 blocks along 
the oceanfront boardwalk. Over $7,500 in prizes will be 
awarded to artists, including a $2,000 Best-ln-Show 
purchase award, a $1 ,500 cash award to the r^ipient of 
the Virginia Governor's Trophy, a $1000 Award of Ex- 
cellence and many other smaller cash awards. 

The first Boardwalk Art Show was held in July, 19S6, 
to benefit artists as well as culturally benefitting the 
citizens of the Tidewater region of Virginia and North 
Carolina. Today, the show is recognized as one of the 
largest of its nature in the Unit«l States. 

The deadline for application is March 1 . Call or write 
Virginia Beach Arts Center. 1711 Arctic Avenue, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 234S1, 804/425-0000. 



Bayside High Sets PTA/SCA Game And Dance 



Bayside High School will hold its annual 
PTA/SCA Basketball game and dance on Friday, 
March 4, beginning at 7 p^. 

Twe-^Mies will be playe^ in the school gym- 
nasium f^turing sophom^^res vs. juniors and 
seniors vs. a^teaincorag^^ of faculty, PTA and 
Booster Club members. A damx iwll follow the 
games in the school cafeteria. 

Admission is two dollars, whkb coven b<Xh 
evenu, and tickets are availabk at the advert tad 
will be available at the dour. 



Between the games a drawing will be held for an 
electric garage door opener, donate by Vir^nia 
Door, Inc.; a dinner for two at JbLm's Restaurant 
in Pembroke Meadows Shopping Center, and 
othn bonus prizes. Donations are one dollar and 
may be purchased at the school or at the ^oie. 
You do not have to be present to win. 

All proceed fnmi this event will be used to 
ivovkte ichohnhiiM to 1^3 Baysifte H^ School 
pwtwttini ioitOTs. 

The iMiblic is invit«l to attend. 



■ 



^mimmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



mmmm 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 1983 



/ 



I 



Vkginia Beach Business & Real E state News 

Mortgage Credit Essential To 
A Healthy Housing Market 



mW 



The National A$wci- 
at ion of Realtors ^#d 
today for a national $im|i> 
mit of government andm-' 
dustry leaders concerned, 
with future housing credit 
needs. 

Housing will recov^ 
only modestly until 
federal deficits are 
reduced substantially and 
there is an adequate sup- 
• ply of capital for housing 
investment, said Harley 
W. Snyder of Valparaiso, 
Indiana, president of the 
National Association of 
Realtors. ^ the long run. 
a strong housing industry 
will requiff'van improved 
market f^ mortgage- 
backed' ^Miies to a^ure 
a idntintfiM^lHftply Of |if- 
fordable m^ifgl^ cre^t. 
This wilt'fr«quire both 
regulalory^nd statutory 
changes, Snyder said. 

The proposed summit 
of government and 
housing iulustry leaders is 
needed lortake an in*depth 
look at the legal, 
regulatory and tax barriers 
thai confront the ability of 
mortgage-backed secui"- 
ities to compete in the 
capital markets and at the 
options for removing 
those barriers. Snyder 
said. He added that such a 
focus could provide the 
"critical momentum" for 
making the necessary 



changes. 

Testifying before the 
Senate Banking Commit- 
tee on the state of the 
housing industry, Snyder 
noted that sales of both 
iww and existing hprnes 
improved during the last 
nK)nths of 1982 and that 
gains were evident in 
building permits and 
FHA-insured loan ap- 
plications. He asserted 
that housing is at last 
emerging from the longest 
d^ression since the 1930s 
and will play its 
traditional role of trading 
the economy to recovery 
this year. 

"While the current up- 
ward trend is encouraging, 
it will take some time for 
the housing sector to 
return to full recovery," 
Snyder told the commit- 
tee. "The fragile recovery 
we are seeing must be 
protected and nurtured in 
order to encourage a 
strong economic recovery 
for all industries. The key 
to maintaining this en- 
vironment of lower in- 
terest rates so crucial to 
housing is congrasional 
control over expanding 
deficits." 

The Realtor president 
cautioned against either a 
federal jobs program or 
housing stimulus 
legislation that would 
provide only minimal and 




1^^ Rent? 



By ROGER PYLE 

When analyzing the question as to whether to rent or 
buy, the key is to analyze the difference between your 
present financial position as a renter and the position 
that will result from a properly structured home pur- 
chase. 

Use the best financing available at the time and take 
advantage of the present tax laws, which are designed to 
assist the homeowner. 

In this e^rample, let's assume that you are considering 
the purchase of a home priced at $75,000. You presently 
pay monthly rent of J4S0 and have $11,000 in savings 
invested at 12 percent per aimum. Using the savings as a 
down payment yoa can inirchase the home with a 
$64,000 mortgage atWA percent for a 30 year term. 

The table shows that if you continue to rent, in three 
years you will have paid more than $17,000 just in rent. 
You also will have paid $11,093 in incouK taxes (based 
on family income of $40,000 per year), that could have 
been saved «ritk mortgage intoest deductions. The ac- 
tual cost of renting for a three year period is as follows: 
Rent paid $17,024 

Federal ta*6s, +11.096 



Interest on savings 
Actual cost of renting 



$28,119 
• 4.454 



$23,665 



Compare this to the actual &^ of buying a home: 
Payment fonaUererf, prmcipal and taxes $26,390 

Saved on income taxes due to real estate 
dediKtions 8.6^ 

Actual cost of buying a home $ 1 7,750 

' ' i X' ■" 

The actual ^t of tniying a home is $5,915 less than 
the ct^'tiAcmtef for rentii^ for the same period of 
time. 

Another raajcM^factor to conader is the difference in 
net worth faulting from rmtinf (V buying. 

If the potent^ buyer in tte exanq^ pven continues 
to rent for ^r^ years, his Mt worth equals your 
original savii^ (^ Hi. 000 jAva S4,454 into-est earned 
on your savings • a total of $ 1 5 ,454. 

If however, yoo ^t^ctase a home in the example, 
your net worth increases to $22,822. This is the equity 
you have built - the (Niginal down payment of 
$11,000.00 plus a minimum, and very conservative 5 
percoit appreciation per year on the hcmie's value, plus 
the amount of the principal ]Mud on the mortgage l(»n. 
Rather than a pile of rent rec^pts, you now have a sub- 
stantial investn^nt. 

The people who ^, "I tjaink I'll wait fm the interat 
rates to come do^tc iM^ore I buy a house," have mM 
;ed the teds of tlie cwrent h(Nising 
have no coMcption of their ac- 
A knowie^nble real estate 
you tlK oppcMunity that awaits 
waiti^ for a return to "tl» 
be Umi^ your be^ chantx in 

Mod and help contort a realtor 
member of tlfr^lMlewat^ Board of Realtors. He or she 
is a professional, who knows tl»! real vali^ of buyii^ a 
home today, and can answer your qt^stk^. 




temporary help while 
creating a larger deficit 
that would exert upward 
pressure on interest rates 
and reduce the supply of 
mortgage credit. 

The housing depression 
of the last few years has 
demonstrated that an 
adequate and affordable 
supply to mortgage credit 
is essential to a healthy 
housing market, he said. 
Traditional mortgage 
financing will have to 
change to meet the $1.5 
trillion worth of housing 
credit demand expected 
during the remainder of 
the decade. 

"While approximately 
30 percent of all loans 
originated by lenders were 
sold in 1982, by the end of 
the decade over 80 percent 
of all mortgages will be 
financed by sales to in- 
vestors in the secondary 
market," Snyder noted. 

Perhaps the single most 
important factor in the 
ability of secondary 
markets to meet this coun- 
try's housing needs is the 
development of new mort- 
gage-backed securities 
that can compete with 
corporate securities, 
stocks and other invest- 
ments in the nation's 
capital market, he said. 

While the ad- 
ministration has taken 



several steps to improve^ 
the marketability of, mort- 
gage-backed securities, 
there are additional 
regulations that must be 
changed-particularly in 
the tax code-before these 
securities can fully com- 
pete with other types ol, 
investment, he said. These 
include removing the 
requirements that repaid 
principal of loans in a 
mortgage pool be passed 
through to securities 
holders and that only one 
type of security be issued 
per mortgage pool. 

"Many of the items we 
have mentioned are 
changes to tax laws and, 
therefore, come under the 
jurisdiction of the Finance 
Committee," Snyder said. 
"However, this committee 
can certainly assume a 
leadership role in seeking 
these changes. Indeed, 
Mr. Chairman, we call 
upon you and your com- 
mittee to lead the way for 
a national summit of 
government and industry 
leaders from all areas con- 
cerned with future 
housing credit needs." 

The National 

Association of 'Realtors, 
the nation's largest trade 
association, represents 
more than 600,000 in- 
dividuals involved in all 
phases of the real estate 
industry. 



Donald H. Smitk 



Smith Joins Staff 



Charles R. Krummell, 
president, Krummell and 
Jackson Associates, P.C, 
a Virginia beach based ar- 
chitectural firm, recently 
announced that Donald 
H. Smith, who previously 
was employed by Waller, 
Todd and Sadler Architec- 
ts, has joined the firm. 

Smith is an architectural 
graduate of Virginia 



Polytechnic Institute and 
State University, Since 
beginning his career in ar- 
chitecture, he has been in- 
volved in projects for the 
U.S. Navy, U.S. Army 
and the U.S. Postal Ser- 
vice. Projects include a 
New Postal Facility, Lyn- 
nhaven Parkway, Virginia 
Beach, and a training 
facility. Dam Ne^k^ 



We Teach The Teachers 

When considering a Real Estate 
School, ask yourself, "Where did 
their instructors get their education?" 
The answer, most likely -- through 
Surety. 

Everyone judges Real Estate schools 
on standards we set years ago. 
Today, these standards still apply. 
We offer license preparation in just 
sixty days, morning as well as evening 
classes at a central location. But 
most importantly, 

WE OFFER RESULTS... 

85% of our students pass the State 

Exam on their first try and our 

Broker Candidates enjoy a 97% passing 

average! 

Come " join the winners. 

Surety, the standard 
of excellence 

Surety 

Real Estate School 

5737 Princess Anne Road 
Virginia Beach, Va. , 23462 

499-2395 




VNB Opens 
14th Branch 



Marvin L. Welton 

New Marketing Director 

Marvin L. Welton has been named marketing 
director for the Research Triangle Professional 
Services Division of Metro Information Services, 
Inc. Welton will be responsible for commercial 
and governmnet marketing activities in the 
Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill area. He worked as 
a products development manager at the Virginia 
Beach headquarters of Metro before his transfer. 

A 1968 graduate of East Carolina University, 
Welton holds a bachelor of science degree in 
physical education and science education. 

Welton is a member of the Dita Processing 
Management Association. He and his wife Dian- 
ne, are the parents of three children, Robert, Paul 
and Nancy. They live in Chesapeake. 



Virginia National Bank 
has opeiKd a new office in 
Virginia Beach. Located at 
4288 Holland Road, the 
new kxation is VNB's 
14th branch in Virginia 
Beach. 

Two Cash Flow Tellers 
are located at the new 
office, one in the vestibule 
area in the branch and a 
Mcond machine at the 
drive-in teller area of the 
office. With the addition 
of these machines, cus- 
tomers in Virginia Beach 
now have a total of 15 
Gash Flow Tellers to »;- 
commodate their routine 
banking needs 24 hours a 
day. ■ ^ ' ! 

The lobby will be DifeS'L 
Monday through Fii4lay - 



from 9:00 a.m. to 2.*0d 
p.m. and Friday evenings 
from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 
p.m. Two drive-in teller 
lanes, in addition to the 
Cash Flow Teller, will 
service customer traffic. 

Frank E. Brodcs has 
1)een named manager for 
the office and Jan Schind- 
ler is the manager's assis- 
tant. 

The building, designed 
by William Verebely and 
Ajisociates of Chesa- 
peake, has 2,628 square 
feet of space. Bear Con- 
struction, of Franklin was 
the general contractor. 

With the (^ning of the 
HoUand Road Office. Vir- 
ginia National has 197 
offices in 81 communities. 



'82a**ReciItir*Year 




Many businesses ^iM 
remember 1982 as a "fpd- 
ink" year. But through a 
provision in the ta^ law 
known as th,p "n«et 
operating ^ jp,ss 
carryback," you can of- 
fset a net operating Icf^ 
against prior income (up 
to three years back) and 
recoup prior taxes paid! 

Assume your 1982 loss 
is S100,000 and your tax- 
able income for 1979 was 
S300,000. Your carryback 



from 1982 will reduce the 
1$>79 taxable income to 
$200,000. You would 
recompute your tax just as 
if your 1979 profit had 
originally been S200JOOO. 
Refund: about $46,000. 

Corporations can file 
claims on Form 1 139. Ask 
your tax advisor if it's 
more desirable to give up 
the carry-back by making 
an election to carry for- 
ward only. 



Betz To Join Smith & Keene 



Realtors Meetings 



Women's Council of 
RMltofs monthly mem- 
Jbership luncheon will be at 
12 p.m., March 3, at the 
Sword and Kilt Restaurant 
(Thalhimers at Military 



Circle). 

This month's prografh" 
Is on "Ethfcs."Comej6i<r 
us and learn whfat 
"Ethics" govern the real 
estate industry. 



Randy Betz, 29, has 
joined ^mith and Keene 
Electrical Contractors as 
Estimator. The announce- 
ment was ipade. today by 
MK A, *:' S#^; *Sec- 
Wlary/tittsutci- of the 
firm. 

Betz will handle 
estimates for residential 



custom homes, town- 
houses, and condM. He 
was formerly a .sales 
representative with R. E. 
Michel Company. 

Betz resides ih Suffolk 
with his wife, Barbara, 
and their children, Davey 
and Meghan. * 




OLDE 



TOWNE 



A Custom Townhouse Community in 

the Urban Tradition. We offer 

exceptional quality at 

affordable prices 




•MCoMlnw 



Kay Afdahl 
460-2770 



Hone 
460-1610 



Modd 
490-2356 



REALTY DIMENSIONS INC. 

ifii CB fS> 



«■■■■■ 



ALL GONE 



Station One 
^ 24th & Ocean Front 

:^ Virginia Beach, Vii^pnia 




104 2-Rootn Suites 



NavccwsTRucre»i 



OCEANFRONT RESORT 
CONDOMINIUM 

24th & Atlantic 
Fin«t In Virginia Beach 
Own your o.vn Oceanfront suite, not time 

^taring . From »81,500. Exclusive sales 
|y PYLE REALTY 460-1777. 

Sdes Offl£C|^ 422-3185 ^Eves.) Ro^r Pyje 

340-6441 - 







141 Virginia Beach Blvd. West 
Norfolk, Virgiiria 23310 

Phone (804) 623-3131 

ADtvBiowofooLowALaavicacowoaATiow 



<lAlJaiitk Pennamnt Afortgi^ ConfMBQr 

A WiK% OwiMd SubmUary <rf Atlmk ftnuacBt i^derai 
Savinis A Loao Anodatkie 

944 IndqwKlam Blvd. 

Virginia Bea^ Vi^inia 23435 

(«04)460-137</2SM 




'iSPlTTT' 

Pyle Realty Promotes 
Virginia Beach 




^oionkU 




^omfumu 



AHVMONOrCOLOMALSBIVKZCOWOMTION 

Virgiiua BeKh Boutevanl West 
Norfolk, Virgiaia 23310 
Phone (104) 623-3753 



(colonial ofitL 



%J\C 



gency 



ADIVISK)f4 0roOLa«Ai.^MCZCXNtfiaUt1ON 

141 Vtrpaia Beach Uvd. West 

NorfaHt. Vii:^a 23310 

TdqitoiiK mm C23-3I31 



Virsinia Beach Business & Real Estate Hews 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 1983 .9 



Setf Employment Tax May 
Rise To 40 Percent 



Although Congress 
should, support the Social 
Security Reform Com- 
mission's proposal in gen- 
eral, an important techni- 
cal change is needed to 
prevent an unfair and dis- 
criminatcffy tax irvcrease 
on self-employed wcfflars, 
according to testimony 
presented today by the 
nation's largest trade 
association. 

Self-empipyed workers 
who, as a class, pay in 
taxes over a longer period 
of time and draw benefits 
over a shorter period of 
time than employee work- 
ers, already are paying 
their own way in the Soc- 
ial Security system, said 
Dr. Jack Carlson, chief 
economist and executive 
vice president of the Nat- 
ional Association of Real- 
tors. 

As a group, the self- 
employed retire later, ac- 
cording to government 
statistics, Carlson told the 
Senate Finance Com- 
mittee at a hearing on the 
Social Security Reform 
Cbmmission plan to shwe 
up the financially ailing 
system. 

Specifically, Bureau of 
Labor Statistics data 
shows that the self- 
employed make up only 
8.9 percent of the total 
workforce-but constitute 
27.2 percent of all workers 
age 65 or dder, he said. 

Further, a recent study 
found that 21.2 percent of 
employee workers leave 
the workforce by age 63, 
while just 1 1 .6 percent of 
tne self-employed workers 
retire by that age. 

"As many as 12 percent 
of self-employed'workefs 

Security ihroiigii work as 
an employee wcwker be- 



torc becoming self-em- 
ployed is, therefwe, sup- 
plementary to the con- 
tributions required of 
them to qualify fw Old 
Age, Survivors and Dis- 
ability benefits." 

The NaticHial Associ- 
ation of Realtors, most of 
whose more than 600,000 
members are setf-em- 
pltqred, clearly recognizes 
the need to get the Social 
Security system back on a 
sound financial footing, 
said Carls<m. However, 
the Associaticm firmly be- 
lieves the proposals re- 
garding self-employed 
taxes were not adequately 
researched and should be 
changed. 

iL^der-ittte current Soc- 
ialt<Securiyi taxation sys- 
tem, a self-employed 
worker pays three-quar- 
tep ofttlK t<Xal amount of 
Social S^citirny taxes paid 
by an emplt^ee and em- 
ployer tit^fether. Thus, the 
Association noted a self- 
employed person already 
is payin'g ^0 percent more 
in Social Security taxes 
than an employee worker. 

The Reform Commis- 
sion proposal calls for 
having the self-employed 
pay the tdtal amount that 
both the employee and 
employer now pay. 

As proposed by the 
commission, the tax hike 
for self-employed workers 
would increase their tax 
burden by 20 percent to 40 
percent, or $300 to $600, 
in 1984 and by $3,600 over 
the next 10 years, said 
Carison. In sharp and 
unfair contrast, employee 
workers and employers 
would not pay any new tax 
tilcreases except those 

.already. AcNdule*;!. MOtiJ 
ifid (Hily during 1088 and 
I989~and then Mily tax 



increases of 0.3 percent, 
or $65 for each of the two 
years--the economist 
noted. 

Left unchanged, Carl- 
son said, the ccrnimis- 
sion's proposal would 
mean that: 

•TTic resulting tax bur- 
den would be greater on 
those least able to pay, 
namely, lower income 
workers. 

•The smallest of small 
business would be handi- 
capped. 

•Business concentra- 
tion would increase. 

•The dream of self- 
employment would be dis- 
couraged for many Ameri- 
cans. 

•Inventive and energe- 
tic workers would be dis- 
couraged. 

"The commission 
would allow the self-em- 
plt^ed a- personal inccxne 
tax decoction equal to 
(Hie-half the (M Age, Sur- 
vivors and Disability In- 
surance (OASDI) Social 
Security Tax payment. 
Apparently this idea was 
adopted by the commis- 
sion in the belief that the 
huge Social Security tax 
increase would be offset 
fron personal income tax, 
resulting in little net in- 
creased out-of-pocket loss 
to the self-employed 
worker." Carlson said. 

"An analysis of this 
proposal, including the in- 
crane tax deduction, indic- 
ates, however, that there 
would be little offsetting 
effect for the vast majority 
of the self-employed, and 
the increase in tax burden 
(Ml self-employed workers 
would be far greater than 
the new tax burden <mi 
ernployee workers-a $439 
increase. <x 30.3 percent, 
for a typical self-employed 



wo-ker, after adjusting for 
a personal income tax 
deduction," he noted. 

Therefore, if a change 
in the tax structure is 
necessary, Carlsai told 
the committee, "We 
strongly recwnmend an 
important technical 
change: 

"Either the tax on self- 
employed workers be in- 
creased only by the same 
percentage as employee 
workers or the prcqxKed 
50 percent deductibility of 
the self-employed tax be 
changed to a 25 percent 
tax credit, a proposal the 
commission itself consid- 
ered as a reascmable 
ahernative. 

"Particularly at this 
time of a fragile economic 
recovery, we should not 
discourage self-employ- 
ment, which leads to im- 
portant innovations, risk- 
taking and extra energy 
from people who choose to 
be their own bosses," 
Carlson concluded. 



Home Loan Should Reflect 
Your Economic Conditions 

"People scrambling for mortgage loans to buy new or 
existing homes should be aware of s(»ne lending 
techniques now coming to the forefront - and the 
advantages and disadvantages of each," said Fran 
Rohdenburg of Goodman Segar Hogan Residential 
Sales Corp. 

"A word of advice, though: ^to one method is 
suitable for all potential buyers, so let the Realtor 
describe each, and then choose the one that's best 
based upon individual econcxnic situations," she 
added. 

Itohdenburg described one financing method which 
has gained in popularity: the adjustable-rate mortgage 
or renegotiable loan. 

"Basically, it's a 30 year mortgage where the interest 
rate adjusts periodically according to the ccKt of money. 
In other words, the interest rate floats with the market. 
The payments, however, remain fixed, usually for three 
or five year periods and are generally much lower than 
with a fixed rate mortgage," she explained. 

"The buyer's hope is that interest* rates will fall by 
the end of* any one of the periods, so that he or she 
won't be tied to a long-term, high-interest mortgage," 
Rohdenburg added. "The lender is more willing to 
make such a loan because he won't have a heavy load of 
Icxig-term loans that must be carried at below 
prevailing interest levels." 

Terms vary on the several types of adjustable-rate or 
renegotiable loans, but most place a limit on the 
amount of increase over the course of 25-or 30-year 
periods and also allow the buyer to refinance at any 
time, she noted. 

"Again, fit the lending terms to your own economic 
situations," she added. "The Realtor can help you 
decide which plan is best." 




VHDA Receives One 
Million For Loans 



The Virginia Housing 
Development Authority 
has been awarded $1.35 
million |to make energy- 
saving improvement loans 
to low-income Virginia 
homeowners. The Energy 
Conservation and Solar 
Energy Bank grant, which 
will be used to cover in- 
terest payments on the 
loans, was the result of a 
join proposal submitted to 
HUD by VHDA and the 
Virginia Office of 
Emergency an«* Energy 
Services. Virginia was one 



of only five states in the 
nation to receive an "out- 
standing" proposal 
rating, and one of only six 
states to receive more than 
$1 million in funding. The 
grant is expected to 
upgrade some 4,000 to 
6,000 homes with in- 
dividual loans ranging 
from $500 to $3,500. 

According to a VHDA 
spokesperson, HUD 
regulations prohibit the 
use of tax-exempt bonds 
ia^ conjunction with the 
grant funds. VHDA, 



which raises funds by 
seihng tax-exempt notes 
and bonds, is currently 
seeking authorization 
from the Virginia General 
Assembly to issue taxable 
bonds. Proceeds from the 
sale of such bonds would 
be used in conjunction 
with the grant to reduce 
the interest rate on loans 
from 0% to ap- 
proximately 6% depen- 
ding on income and 
amount borrowed. The 
program is scheduled to 
begin in June. 



Palmateer Promoted 
ToVPOfGSH 



Ciuudinan Segar Hogan Residential Saks Corporation 
rci.cnil> announced the promotion of Ann R. Palmateer 
lo tilt position of Vice President of the company. 

Palmateer has been with Goodman Segar Hogan sin- 
ce 1976. She has been managing broker of the 
Chesapeake office since 1980. 

I'ainiaiccr received her B.S. in Education from Buf- 
lalo Stale 1 cachers College in Buffalo, New York. 

Halnmteer is a GRl and CRS candidate; Chairman of 
the tducation Committe of the Tidewater Board of 
Realtors since 1981 ; Region VI Chairman of the Education 
Committee for 1982 and 1983; a member of the Board of 
V.A.R. since 1982; a Member of the Board of the 
TidcwaiL-r Board for 1983; Instructor for the Brokerage 
i oufM.' at 1 idcwater Community College; Vice-Chainnan 
ot I he Real Lstate Advisory Committee for 1983; and In- 
siriicior lor the Tidewatflr. Boarth Indoctrination Course 
lor ihc last 2ycar>. 

Paiinaieer is a resident of Chesapeake, is married to 
Homer Palniaieer, and has three children. 



Serving The Real Estate Needs 
Of Chesapeake 

WAINWRIGHT REALTY 

Are you considering selling your home? If so, now is the ideal 
time. Call us for a free, no obligation market analysis. We will in- 
form you of the best methods of disposing of your property, 
various types of financing available and other information per- 
tinent to the sale of your property. 

3237 Western Branch Blvd. 

In The Heart Of Churchland 




484-7777 



Members of Portsmouth, Chesapeake Multiple Listing Service 
Metro Multiple Listing Service 
Portsmouth, Chesapeake Board of Realtors 




Holiday Inn Under New Management 



V.jiA. Zodda, president, 
the Victor Management 
Cc«npany, Hampton has 
announced that Victor 
Management has ac- 
quired the Holiday Inn- 
39th Street in Virginia 
Beach in a joint venture 
with VMS Realty, Chic- 
ago, UUnois. 

hi a statement, Zodda 
said: 

"I am delighted that we 
now own and operate the 
two oceanfront Holiday 



Inns in Virginia Beach. 
Our partner in this ven- 
ture, VMS ReaUy of Chic- 
ago, joins us in announc- 
ing the appointment of 
George H. Ritko as the 
General Manager, Holi- 
day lnn-39th Street. We 
are proud to be an active 
partner with the City in 
promoting Virginia 
Beach." 

The Holiday Inn-39th 
Street was purchased 
from Thomas J. Lyons, a 



general partner with Rip- 
arian Investment Asso- 
ciates. Thomas J. Lyons 
bought the hotel, formerly 
the Americana, in 1972. 
Since then, the rooms 
have been expanded to 
265 and the employee 
number to 60. 

The Holiday lnn-39th 
Street has two restau- 
rants: "That Seafood 
Place" and "The Green- 
ery". It is equipped with a 
lounge, "The Summer of 



'42", and extensive con- 
vention facilities, includ- 
ing a conference area that 
seats between 700 and 
800. In additicHi, the hotel 
also has a banquet room, 
a large amphiiJieatre off 
the nuun lobby, and an 
(Hitdoor swimming pool 
and deck area. According 
to a spcAesman with Vic- 
tor Management Co., the 
new owners will be mak- 
ing interior renovations in 
the lobby and room areas. 




REALTY WORLD. 

National Realty Inc. 

"The Results People" 
Serving 

All of Tidewater 

Sell -Buy -Rent 



^ Camclot««Duoedin 

Lt)ck!sley Gardrais 

Silverwo<xi»»Peachtrec 

Brentwopd«»Timberlake 

4 Greenrun»»Foxhall 

Pine Neeclles»*Newtown South 

and 

Many many others. 



CALL 



485-5950 



Ch^apeakc 
Portsmoilfe 



^^900 W Beach 



Rhodes Realty Proudly 
Congratulates 

Frances Hedge 




February's Top Agent 

with $220,000 in volume! 

For all your Real Estate 

needs call Francis . . . 

482-1173 

Rhodes Realty, Ltd. 

lU? f 239S,BMltfWdBhHl.Clm. 




ii? 



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$m 9tt0^ pin wt ntl^e m €'^^tn^e^e 



We're Number 1 
In Great Bridge 

• Rcsideniial 

• Commerrifli 

• Farms 
Speri«ii.<(l<t 

Serving Chesapeake Since 1964 



Kicarbo, Jfnc. 

REALTORS** 

MILDRED B. RICARDO 
PRESIDENT 







351 Johnstown Road, Chesapeake, Va. 

• In the Heart of Great Bridge 
• 547^555 



Call Us... 

We're Neighbors 



Behind our seemingly quiet 
exterior hums the latest in 
computer technology. Want 
to know how much your home 
has gone up over the years, 
the price of the one down the 
street, or the latest types of 
loans available... Call us, 
we're your neighhjjrs a. 
and we're here t^helpu ' ^ 

Goodman Segar Hogan 

Great Bridge Shopping Ctr. 
237 S.BattleHeM Blvd. 

482-3395 




rilh 






P^VWP 



mmmmm 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 19»3 



The Woman's View 




Coffee - If percolated col 
fee tastes bitter, next time 
add a pinch of dry 
mustard to the water to 
restore the real coffee 
taste. For better tasting 
coffee, put the ground 
coffee beans in a heat- 
proof container or a piece 
"of heavy-duty aluminum 
foil made into a saucer 
shape and put it in a 
preheated 325°F oven for 
about three minutes. It 
works wonders. 
Note: This does not work 
for instant coffee. 

Cream, Whipping - add 

the white of an egg, then 
chill the cream for twenty 
minutes and it'll whip 
easily. Or add a few drips 
of pure lemon juice or a 
sprinkling of plain gelatin ' 
powder to the cream. 
Creaming Butter And 
•Suger - before creaming 
butter and sugar, soak the 
bowl in very hot water for 



The 

Hint 

Man 

By CHICK FAULKNER 



three minutes and the task 
will go twice as fast. 
Note: Be sure to dry the 
bowl before starting. 
Curtains - Slip a thimble 
over the end of the curtain 
rod and the curtain will 
slip through easily. Or cut 
the finger off an old cloth 
glove and pull it over the 
end of the curtain rod. 
Note: Don't use leather 
gloves. They prevent slip- 
page. 

Dandruff - To keep it un- 
der control, use mouth- 
wash. After the normal 
shampooing and rinsing, 
pour mouthwash directly 
onto the scalp and let it 
dry. Or rub salt into the 
dry hair, then massage for 
five minutes before 
washing your hair. 

Chuck Faulkner is brought to 
you through the courtesy of The 
Donning Company, a local 
publishing firm, and Chuck 
Faulkner. The book is available 
in most book stores. 



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5302 Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Va., 23464 

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Introducing 

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And Greenhouses 

1752 Virginia Beach Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 23454 

Chris Sterling 422-2501 



Specialists 

in 

Manicures • Pedicures 

For Men & Women 

Try Us 

Barbara Niles 
Beauty Spa 

Near Pembroke Mall 

Total 

Beauty 

Salon 

Call 
For Appointmenl 

497-4759 490-9288 




Fc^r Beauty's Sake 

Pantry Full Of 
Beauty Aids 

You can add to your beauty supplies just by 
checkina the shelves at home and combining some 
staples. Many household products have ingredients 
helpful to maintaining your good looks. Here are some 
and what they can do for your beauty. 

Petroteam Jelly. An inexpensive product with lots of 
uses, such as removing eye makeup, soothing minor 
bums and scrapes, and softening cuticles. It also adds 
glossy shine to eyelids, cheeks and lips. 

Cold Greun. Because of its oil content, cdd cream is 
a great makeup removal. It can be used as a 
moisturizing makeup base, a beauty mask, and 
cleansing cream. It also helps to cod sunburned skin. 
Safllower Oil. This cooking oil can be used as a suntan 
dl and as a body moisturizer. 

Shampoo. Substitute a mild shampoo for bubble bath 
(1 capful per bath; mix weU with water). Use it as a nail 
OT foot soak bef(»-e a manicure or pedicure. If you run 
out of soap detergent use a mild shampoo to wash 
lingerie (and even to wash the family dc^). 

Qreme Mnse. This can help soften dry hands, h also 

makes a soothing bath "lotion." 

Epsom Salts. Use in the bath to relieve achy muscles. 

Plastk Food Wrap. Wrap it around hair after 

applying a ccmditioner or creme rinse to hdd in heat 

and moisture as the ccmditicxier works. 

Witch Hazel. This all-purpose product can be used 
after shaving legs. Rub it into skin to soothe sort 
muscles. It can also help soothe insect bites, ot relieve 
minor burns. 

Talcum Powder. Use it as a face powder, as a 
soothing, smoothing after-bath treat, or to absorb 
sweat in shoes or on palms of hands. 

Yinegar . Combined with about one quart of warm 
water, V* to '/: cup of white vinegar is an ideal answer 
fcx- tired and aching feet. Soak them for about 30 
minutes. 

Tomatoes. Yes, tcnnatoes (but only if you're not 
allergic to them) can be used to brighten up a dull 
complexicm. Cut a thick slice of tomato and rub it over 
your freshly cleaned face. Leave it on until dry and then 
rub it off gently with a warm terry cloth. The 
microscopic top layer of dead skin cells should peel 
away and pores should be opened and cleansed. 

Beer. Beer isn't just for drinking! When mixed with 
an ordinary shampoo, beer will restore the luster to 
hair. About 4 cups of beer should be boiled down to 
make about V* cup. Then just add 1 cup of a favorite 
shampoo and "ale up" hair with suds. Shampoo as 
usual. 





The 

Chopping 

Block 

ByPATBEASLEY 



After last week's busy time of cutting, didng and 

slaving over a hot stove, and since I am fond of 

microwave coddng, I would like to stere these with 
you. 

T«4ce-B«ktd Polatoca 

Total (»oklng time: 23 minutes 
6poutoes UtcanwoBMlt 

3 tabletpomu butter or 
marsarine 



MavBdU 



Prick potatoes with tines Of fork. Cook at H^h for 16 
minutes. Wrap with foil; let stand 3 minutes. Slice off 
and discard the top of each potata Scot^ out inside of 
each potato to make 6 shells, la large bowl combine the 
scooped-out pouto, butter, salt, aiul penier. Mash, 
adding enough milk to make fluffy consistency. Spoon 
mashed potatoes into ttw potato shells. Place stuffed 
potatoes on serving plate; sprinlde with paprika. Code 
at High for 2 minutes. CSve dish a half turn and code at 
Iflgh for 2 minutes till pouuoes are heated through. 
Garnish with snipped panley or chives, if desired. 
Makes 6 servings. 

Note: If desired, stuff poutoes ahead and 
refrigerate. Cook at Iflgh for 8 minutes, giving dish a 
half turn after 4 minutes. 

RoUcd Stuffed Meat Loaf 

Total cooking time: 19 minutes 



scam and ends. Place meat roll, seam side down, in 12 
X 7'/2 X 2-inch baking dish. Cook at High for 5 minutes. 
Cook, uncovered, at Median H^h (7) for 10 minutes. 
Let stand 5 minutes, femove to platter. Pour some of 
the Cheddar Cheese Sauce over; pass remaining sauce. 
Makes 6 servings. 

Cheddar Cheese Saon 

2 tablcHJOons butter or '/« teaspoon salt 

nuugarine • cuP "«'"' _, . .. 

2 ublespoons all-Durpose 1 cup shredded Cheddar 
flour cheese (4 oz.) 

In 2-cup glass measure heat butter at H^ for 30 
secaids till melted. Stir in flour and salt. Add niUk ail at 
(Mice. Cook at High for 2'/i minutes tiU thickened and 
bubbly, stirring onw after 1 minute then every 30 
seconds. Add cheese; stir till cheese melts. 
Tips A Technlqaet 

There is a secret to success in maldng a tender. Juicy 
meat loaf. First, mix the egg, liquid, crumbs, and 
seascMiing ingredients together in a bowl. Ihen crumble 
in the meat and mix lightly till it is will comMned. 
Overmixing will result in a conpact loaf. When shaping 
the loaf, handle the meat mixture only as much as 
necessary. 

I do hope you have success with these recipes. 
Do try one or all, and Enjoy! 



'A cup chopped celery 
2 Ublespoons butter or 

mariarine 
i cup herb-seasoned stufrmg 

croutpns, crushed 

1 2-ounctean fluuhroom 

stems and piaces, drained 
W cup hot water 



2 eggs, slightly beaten 

■/j cup fine dry bread crumbs 

'A cup milk 

I teaspoon salt 

I teaspoon onion powder 

'A teaspoon dry mustard 

I ■/: pounds ground beef 

'/] cup chopped carrot 

Cheddar Cheese Sauce 

In bowl conbine eggs, crumbs, milk, salt, onion 
powder, and mustard. Add beef; mix well. On waxed 
paper, pat into a 12 x 8-inch rectangle. In small bowl 
combine carrot, celery, and butter or nuugarine. Code 
at High for 4 minutes till v^etabies are tender. Stir in 
croutons, mushrooms, and water. Spoon down center of 
meat rectangle. Fold sides of meat over to center; seal 




To make indivldaal meat loaves, divide the meat 
mixture into equal portions. Mdd into even-shaped 
loaves. Arrange In a 12 x IVi x 2-inch glass baking dish. 
Cover loosely with waxed paper and cook as recipe 
directs. 






Qlalanml Bitot mpmv 

6220 Indian River Road 
Virginia Beacli, Va., 23464 




r^Too'SFF 



WHOLE OR 
HALF SOLES 
AND HEELS 

(Umll 1 Pair) 
With Coupon 

Eiptm Mu. 31, ItU 



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Edic Ail 

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We have styling choices 

for everyone and for 

all ages! 

Precision Prdfesdonal 
Haircuts Perms 

»5.70 43.95 up 




Open 9-6 I^iUy 
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Saa-9093 



539HilUopPlBia iM7/tabwiDr. 
42S-M97 *1M0» 



m S. Ljruhaven Pkwy- 4M1-E SboicJDr. 

MMcity Shopping Center 2301G CoHcy Ave. 
399.8881 tt^«i7 

No Appolnlmenis 
CoHM In At Your Convenience 



SlltV. 

497.970 

AlM3iaioMin 
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aiiillafliptoa 





Ounce O'Gold 

Proclaims 
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on 



Rings & Rings 

14Kt. Gold 

Men & Ladies Rings 
Reg. »30. a Gram 



Now Just *20.00 /Gram 




CZ'DianoiNHTopai 

MeaaUi^ Avaihble 

(Aay SIOM Caa Be Special Ordcml) 

GfMnbrier Mali 
Chesapeake 

420-3932 



Vii^inia Beacli 
iltHiniopWest 

^ 425-0440 




A Cruise? A Tour? 
A Weekend Get Away ? 

Whatever you're planning, 
Cher or Millie at the 

Chesapeake Travel Service 

will help you make 
your dreams come true! 

Wherever your heart dnires, 
one of these super-friendly, travel 
professionals cw take the worry out of 
a vacation. 



Why not call 4aO-77W today, or, better 
yet, drop by 9M Live 0§k Drive 
in Ch«apMke. 



FrancNsed >- Dance Studio 



Dancing. 

Get the spirit. Laugh and have 
some smHes again. Loosen 
(4> and dance the rtght away 
^op being a watcher and step out 
into the tun. 

it Will Cheer 

YMiUi>.LiftYouUp,And 

Put Smiles Of Fun in\bur 

■ fjl^ Vtou can do It at Arthur Murray s 
n l iy The leadN^ dance instructors can 
*""■ make you a superts dancer, with 

pmse and new conlidence 

8 Sessions For 

LeamH^ M) darK« e easy and hm 
wrth ttw provwi Arthur IMurrays 
' method, ktoetmg new people and 
" gomg out is a part ot ttie benefits a 
good dancing partner gets TaNe 
me tirst step, call lor lessons lod^ ' 




Hustle ■ SwKig • Slow Oance ■ 
Cha-Cha ■ Fox Trot • ftimba 
■ Couf«try« Others 



^ 1 P.M. to 10 P.M. 



467-4747 



740Timteriake Shopping Ctr. 
Holland RMd & S. Plaza TraU 

Virf^Bla Beach 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 1983 1 1 




fhe Woman's View 



Countryside Shops, located adjacent to the Virginia Beach Farmer's Miir Icel in Virgiliia Beach offers a unique 
blend of arts and crafu by local artisans. 

The many talents of a select few are displayed throughout the bwiutiful coUntry4tyle, family oriented shop 
spaces. Personal touch is the order of the day and there is eloquence and beauty in every object d'art. 

The pride each talented craftsman or artist takes in their work is ever evident. 



^ 



Country^.de Shop s 



Where The Talent Is 




Sari DcM, local artU. iMfiicd by Wiril Otimty, 
Sui iMgaa her carter hi iaic IMS. She Iovm ^oing 
dowM aad aaianli n* pais her "kcail" ta 

Sazi |Mrtici|Mlt» la shows frtqweatly aad has her 
woffc 4iifi»yt4 ap aad dowa Ihc Eail CoaM. 



[:dif»||^g|M|^lMWMcd Ok rcspo*. 



Patricia Boiiow. ""UttjImpLlady". WUIc Hvlag la 
Northern CdH« - 
lihliily for 
ritcgotveryl 

Bctteveii^ wo<l;;lrMc of ow ffaMsl "nalaral 

rcsourcts", ever; llHi she Birta b doae so with the 

TLC (leader, 1*^ OtaM aAig aalaral dyes 

-prodaccd fron MMWfcAMlM, aad mHhrooiM, cte. 

-TMaUlralyaa<|^Jh4& 






George Safirc, Wood CarViag. George practiced 
naay crafts over the years aaill finally Mitiag oa his 
favorite, wood carviag. 

Hte facial carvings la "Cy^ess knees" have a 
distinct "personality" all their owa. They are warm 
and "frieadly" carvings and uniquely hte owa 
creation. 



Linda De La Zctda (Soft Scalplarc). Having at- 
tained success thra^ her iaIeM aad craft, Linda is 
busily eagaged in crcaling, devek»piag, aManfac- 
tnring, displayiag aad seWag her wares. A Mend of 
country and conlemporary for yoaag aad oM alike is 
evitkal la all her work. Colorfal aad baniy is her 
style. 

The cats, chkkeas, hones aad other animals all 
seem to say. "come, pick me up and squeeze me, I'm 
yoars." 





|„ SS^ Goss, Wheat wAMB" 
I^^^Bl^t an nnusaal, qaaAwd 
^^Maaiifal craft she learadl whHc 



Chris Davis (Clay Maffln 
Maker). Some of the most 
unMHai and amusing characters 
yea'N evcriec are ihc LUde Maf- 
llat (sloaeware pottery) by Chris 
Itavb. They're cute. They're 
. They really art diffcreal. 

The kind of gift thai will didl 
a smUe and cawc a twiakle in the 
eye of the receiver. 

From Dcavcr, Chris broaght 

genu to Viiflida Beach 

some lime back. She's beca 

working in clay for over two 

yean aad has ao plaas to slop. 



Goss, Wheat 
at an nnasaal, 
■iifal craft she learadl whHc 
in Germany. 

Thousands of people me very 
glad she bruught the craft back 
to this coanlry with htr. 

After soaking Ihc wheal ia 
water for 30 miaults or more, 
Pam to able to create jusi about 
aay dcs^n or shape sIm wants. 
Seeiiv thte beaaUfal crafi to the 
only way lo realty appreciate it. 





4848 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

490-3105 



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TMtdiqr ilmi Satwtey 
•Clo«i»toiiday 



MltHKHCTRCXTT 
PORTSMOUTH 




Polly Pcarce attends io Audrey Horlon. ■ Virginia Beach 
resi«ltal, at Barbara Nlits Beauty Salon. 

Barbara Niles 
Means Beauty 



Once upon a time, there 
were places for the 
fabulously wealthy, the 
rich and the famous. 
Now, beauty spas like the 
Barbara Niles Spa on 
Constitution Drive in 
Virginia Beach across 
from Peftibroke Mall, 
have been made affor- 
dable for the average and 
the middle class. 

So says Polly Fearce, 
the spa's manager. "It 
used to be that only the 
super-rich could come to 
{riaces like this," she said. 
"But now. all that has 
changed. The problem is, 
a lot of people still believe 
that you have to be rich to 
be beautiful." 

The Barbara Niles Spa 
dfJTers services unfyailable 
at any other spa in the 
area, said Pearce. Among 
its offerings are: a sauna, 
a Jacuzzi, two suntanning 
machines, body scrub- 
bing, mineral baths, hair 
styling, manicures, 
pedicures, facials, 
aerobics and "jazzerdse." 
Additionally, the Niles spa 
offers courses in self im- 
provement, how to 
prepare for beauty 
pageants, and charm 
courses for teens. 

One can get the whole 



works, a day of 
beautification. for '125, 
according to Pearce. 
"What a beautiful 
thought for a husband to 
give a gift like this to a 
wife," she said. Individual 
treatments, of course', cost 
much less. Hair styling, 
for instance, starts at just 
•8 per cut. 

Men, as well as women, 
utilize the spa, said Pear- 
ce. "We have- one man, 
who if 1 said his name 
everyone would know 
him, who comes in here 
every two weeks like 
clockwork for his 
manicure," she said. "He 
is in the public eye a lot 
and he wants to make sure 
he looks his best.- 

"1 think it rs'"fantasttc 
that men are becoming 
conscious of grooming 
habits," Pearce con- 
tinued. "They are starting 
to realize that grooming is 
just as important to them 
as it is to women." 

The spa features five 
hairdressers, six nail 
specialists, three facial 
specialists, three body 
scrub specialists, three 
body wrap specialists, one 
exercise instructor and one 
dietician. 

"Being beautiful is a 



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Notes 
To 

My 
Friends 

ByJIMKINCAlD 



Like freedom, they 

have been legislated and 
regulated away, and their 
constitutions declare as 
much. Visiting, yes 

January 23, 1980. 

There was an interest- 
ing story in the business 
section of the Washington 
Awnoday. 

It said the Commerce 
I>epartmcnt is currently 
considering some excep- 
tions to the President's 
ban on selling high tech- 
nology items to the Soviet 
Union. 

It said some business 
people have been told 
they can do business as 
usual in about a month. 

The Commerce Depart- 
ment explains this in a 
curious way. 

The official statement 
says, and 1 quote. "I can 
reasonably be concluded 
that a policy of granting 
exceptions falling into a 
few hardship categories 
would not contravene the 
President's wishes..." 

In other words, it's okay 
to ask sacrifices of farm- 
ers and athletes, but busi- 
ness is business. 

January 24, 1980. 

I read a lengthy article 
today about the years of 



training and self-denial 
that it takes to become an 
Olympic athlete. 

It went on about the 
deep worry of many of our 
American athletes that 
their chance to ctMnpetc in 
Moscow may be taken 
away, and I sympathized 
with the young people 
involved. 

I sympathized up to the 
point that a gymnastics 
coach was quoted, saying 
that tho^e of us outside 
the athletic world can't 
realize just what it means 
to see your nation's flag 
raised in triumph. 

Perhaps not, but I know 
where we can get the 
information. 

In the wards of any 
veterans' hospital, for a 
start, or on a stroll 
thrcMigh a military ceme- 
tery. 

Such an exercise might 
also remind the interested 
visitor of what sort of 
self-denial it took to make 
the flag a triumphant 
symbol in the first place. 

This serici of exccipis ftom 
"Noies To My Friendi" is 
brought to you through the cuur 
tny of The Donninic (ompaH), 4 
local publishing firm, and Jim 
Kincaid. The l)ook is available in 
most book stores. 



mental as well as a 
physical process," said 
dietician Ellen McKay. "It 
is a matter of total 
behavior modification. 
We have to work from the 
inside out and from the 
outside in." 

Pearce agreed that 
beauty is, in most cases, a 
process of mind over mat- 
ter. "You can come in 
here and feel like you are 



the ugliest person in the 
world, but when you walk 
out of here, 1 can turn your 
whole attitude around," 
she said. "I love the 
challenge. And 1 really en- 
joy making people* feel 
good about themselves. 
That's really what this is 
all about." 

For further information 
on the Barbara Niles 
Beauty Spa, call 497-4759. 



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12 Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 1983 



•Si, 



Th« Church 
If Th« P«opl« 



Church Hewi 

■ , 0^ ^ ^ 



11i«Ptepl« 
ArtTtMClNircli 



Minister To The Needs Of The People 



Calvary Assembly Of God 



The pastor of Calvary 
Assembly of God, 
Leonard M. Campbell, 
returned to Virginia Beach 
in July 1982. While it was 
his first time to pastor this 
church, he was not a new- 
comer as he had formerly 
ministered at the First 
Assembly of God here, 
and built their present 
church. It was a return to 
an area he loved and a 
challenge to again minister 
in Virginia Beach. 

As well as being a 
minister. Rev. Campbell 
has had a varied 
background, both in the 
ministry and in business. 
He started an Assembly of 
God in Arlington, 
Virginia, built a church, 
and from there was called 
to the national headquar- 
ters of the Assemblies of 
God in Springfield, 
Missouri, to establish a 
department of Sales and 
Advertising for their Sun- 
day School literature. This 
included educational 
materials on a graded base 
for Sunday Schools in 
several thousand churches 
in America and other 
countries. 

While pastoring in 
Beaumont, California and 
building a new church, he 
was chosen as mayor of 
the city and his wife. 
Faith, was elected 
president of the Beaumont 
Teachers' Association. 
Campbell was a member 
of the Industrial Develop- 
ment Association of 
California, Kiwanis Club, 
and served as president of 
the Boy Scouts of 
American in Riverside 
County. 
Later in Ohio he was the 



owner of Aircraft Tooling 
Company which afforded 
many interesting experien- 
ces in engineering, 
designing and building 
special precision tooling 
for the aero-space in- 
dustry. One of the most 
enjoyable experiences 
during this period was his 
contact with Neil Ar- 
mstrong, the first man to 
walk on the moon. 

Leaving the business 
world behind, Leonard 
Campbell came to 
Virginia Beach to pastor 
for three years. After 
resigning from the 
pastorate of First Assem- 
bly of God, the Campbells 
went to England and 
resided there for nine 
months. Rev. Campbell 
has had a great deal of 
overseas ministry, four 
trips to Brazil, three trips 
to Africa and several times 
in Europe. He has a 
tremendous interest in 
missionary work and has 
always emphasized the 
support of foreign 
missionaries in all of his 
pastorates. 

Joining him in the 
ministries • of Calvary 
Assembly of God are 
Harvey Beeton as 
Associate Pastor and 
Stanley Turnbull as Youth 
Pastor; Mrs. Dorothy 
Smith as Director of 
Christian Education. 

Rev. Beeton is a former 
Navy Captain who on 
retirement went to South- 
eastern Bible College to 
prepare for the ministry. 
His wife Nancy, was the 
first president of 
Women's Aglow 

Fellowship in this area. 
His background and 



assignments in the Navy 
have provided him with a 
wealth of experience that 
enables him to minister to 
the needs of people. In 
visitation and counselling, 
he and his wife are an ef- 
fective team. 

Stanley Turnbull, son 
of missionary parents, 
spent his early years in 
Haiti and the Dominican 
Republic. Later the family 
moved to California 
where he graduated from 
high school and then 
enrolled in and graduated 
from Central Bible 
College In Springfield, 
Missouri. There he met his 
future wife, a music 
major, Cheryl Turnbull, a 
very talented singer, who 
is the choir director at 
Calvary. Stan plans the 
youth activities which in- 
clude a Wednesday night 
youth service and a Satur- 
day night L.I.F.E. rally. 
Stan's father is presently. 
Director of International 
Ministries for CBN. 

The Director of 
Christian Education, 
Dorothy Smith, has been a 
member of the church for 
many years. She effec- 
tively administrates the 
Sunday School and 
Children's Church ac- 
tivities and assists in the 
church office. 

The main thrust of these 
devoted and experienced 
lenders and workers at 
Calvary Assembly of God 
is to minister to the needs 
of the people while ever 
looking to today and 
tomorrow without 
dwelling on the past, and 
performing every task 
with zeal with the Lord in 
mind. 




Cahrarjr 

AaMMMjr 

WGoi 

!■ 

VirgialaBeiKli 



CHURCH BULLETINS — 

World Day Of Prayer 

March 4, 1983 

Sponsored in the U.S. by Church Women United, this annual 
observance unites women of faith in 170 countries on six continents 
around the globe. 




Sunday Mcinday Tuesday 

.Nlark i* Mark Luke 

():4o-o2 ^ 1 1 : 1 2-a5 8:22-25 



Wednesday 
Mark 

14:3-9 



niun-iday 

Luke 

n:l-ll 



Friday 

Luke 

9:10-17 



Saturday 

Luke 
23:26-49 



C*aar l\oad .^6A«m.bl^ of C/od 





91«CE0ANROAD 

GREAT BMIOGE 

CHESAPEAKE VIROINIA 23120 

TELEI'HONE S47 M5I Of M? 2233 



Morahit Worship 

UnMorClrarrh) It.Ma.M. 

EvaufcliMic Service ....7:Np.n. 
TacMiay Young Adnlli. . 7:M |i.«. 
W^ncwiay Famliy Nitht7:3ep.w. 



(^/rs/C^ap//s/ &hurch 



p 

I 




WonMp Services 

Saaday School 9:45 a.i 

Moraiag WonUp I1:M a.i 

Cbareh Tratalag «.-M p.i 

Eveaiag WoraMp 7.-M p.i 

KtnHemphUl, Pastor 

312 Koi^evilit Road. Norfolk, V«., 235*2 461-M39 



■rcr 



Mysteries 

The words themselves are mysteries to him— black "squiggles** against 
the white page — but Daddy makes them sound very interesting. 



Later he will begin to read for himself and a vast new world will be 
opened. 

In it, however, other mysteries will appear— other things that seem as im- 
possible as the black words against the white page. But gradually these will 
become clearer. 

One of these mysteries is religion. Understanding God's message, learning 
the meaning of faith— these vital subjects take a particular kind of 
education and special study, it will take the remainder of his lifetime, and 
yet more, to fully understand the spiritual universe. 



But this little boy is lucky. 
Although he doesnt know it yet, his 
parents will see to it that he gets this 
"education" in the right place— in 
their house of worship. 



CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

4925 Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard Campbell, Pastor 

495-1004 
Youth L.I.F.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. 



<^; 






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PItOVIOENCE ROAD - vmGINI* BEACH VIRGINIA 



<^ 



1^.1 ,, , H.r'.i.m h.,i. 



. i ^ ,. KauJi 



Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 



HThc 
Open Door (m)m-mi 
Chapd 

3177 Va. Beach Blvd., Va. Bcack, Va., 234S2 

SUNDAY TUEa>Ay 

SaateySckoel 9:1SAM MIcSMr WflilM 

WonWpSmte IMAM 

....It-JtAM WEDNEStAV 

PrtfKScn^n fcSaPM MM.^nckl«'«lea....-Mtf|f 




OADTWrnS 



SINDAY 



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Norfolk, Va., 23502 



461-5041 



WEDNESDAY 

T;J* P.M. tmuat mm A t a iW n 

DAILY 

MmMhw* AMU •( Va. Brt. - Nwf . 



R. L. Kay, f^tor Danny R. Thom^,Asocioie nsior 



Kings Grant Baptist Church 

873 Little Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



SUNDAY 
Muiait WorMp . . . I.-Wa^. 

SradaySdm^ 9Ma.M. 

Su^ SdM^ IMta-M. 

fttontoi Worrit .. 1 140 a.H. 
Evcahv Wanli^ , . . 7<0 p.ai. 



WEDNESDAY 
FMri^ Nl(^l Diaaer . iM p.m. 
GnrfedOMhw'f 

C*«^ fc30p.ai. 

Pra]«rScnrkc *:4Sp.w. 



Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
340-0902 



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Virginia Beach Sun, March 2. I'is'^ 1 3 



Guide To Virginia Beach 



^^nii 



aued 



& Craft. 
\uectlote 



Arts & Crafts Show 

Lynnhaven Mali 

Women's Aux lu the VBMS 

2nd Annual Craft Show 

Health Education Ctr. at 

Va. Beach General Hospital 

Norfolk School Art Show 

Military Circle Mail 

Mid Atlantic Wild Fowl Show 

Pavillion 

Va. Beach Art Ctr. Art Festival 

Pavillion 

Youth c:raft Day 

Va. Beach Recreation Ctr. 



Mar. 2-5 
March 25 



March 7 -12 

March 4-6 

428-4222 Info 

March 24 -26 

428-4222 Info 

Every Tuesday, Ages 6-17 

463-0505 Info 



Yesterdays' 

- Treasures 



Todays' 

Handicrafts 
Tomorrows' -- 

WeirJooms 



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Carraway House 

317 S.Witchduclc Road 

l/t delightful trip inio ihe 
Ipasl with I8lh cenlury 
I rei'roduciions and antiques . 
We carry something for 
everyone from Stieff 
Pewter and Baldwin Brass 
to beuuttful Madisoni 
Square furniture. Alsot 
country items like candles, 
folk art, primitive pain-\ 
lings, etc.. .gift items of a\ 
wide variety. Hours 10 til 5 
daily, I til 5 Sun. Closed 
1 Wed. 
•1901 



,^"'/.,.^''%- r,,, 
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Carraway House 



14 'Vir jlniaBcafch Suil, March 2, 1983 



Vir3inia Beach Sun Hews 




Mark Batni, (SO) co<aplaiii for Kerapsville High School's basketball Chiefs, shoots for two 
over BHIy Hokomb of Kellam (54). Boo Boo McGlone (22) and Roger Burnham (12) look for the 
icbouMl. 



Kempsville 

Topples 

Kellam 

The Kempsville Chiefs, 
with a berth in this week's 
Eastern Region Basketball 
Tournament already sewn 
up, advanced to the Beach 
District's title game again- 
st Green Run last week by 
defeating the Knights Of 
Kellam High School 52-45 
at Plaza Junior High. 

Led by 5-,7 Boo Boo 
McGlone, Kempsville 
over-came a 17-15 half- 
time deficit. The Chiefs 
turned back Kellam with a 
lot of help from McGlone, 
who connected on nine 
consecutive free throws in 
the fourth quarter. 

McGlone finished the 
contest with, 18 points. O. 
J. Dozier contributed 11 
points, and Mark Batzel, 
slowed by a twisted ankle, 
chipped in eight points. 

Roland Foreman of 
Kellam was the game's 
high scorer with 22 points. 
Knight Tim Christian, 
who sat out much of the 
second half, added 10 
points to the losing effort. 
It was five straight long- 
range jump shots by 
Foreman late in the game . 
that kept Kellam alive. 
McGlone's maestro-like 
performance at the foul 
line proved to be the dif- 
ference in the .end, 
however. 

Kellam, coached by 
former Old Dominion 
University player Joey 
Caruthers, lost all four of 
its games with Kempsville 
this year. Kempsville is 
coached by Dick Ponti. 



Billy O'Brien Still Urging Lottery 



QfifigtttetJ.W^ ; ' *amy •'• O'Brien o/ ' Virginia' ' 
Beach said he hopes to make elections this 
Novei^ber an unofficial referendum on a state- 
wise lottery across the state. 

He said a large majority of Virginiians would 
'vote in favor of a lottery if given an cqiportunity ~ 
and is equally cmvinced that scxne legislators 
voted against his prqxxal fa* a IcXtery referen- 
dum this year not because of any deep sense of 
conviction that a lottery is milH-ally wrong, but 
because they are uncertain how their ccnistituents 
feel aboat it. 

O'Brien said he will call oa pe(q}le who are 
prc^onents of a lottery referendum to make 
known their feelings in electims across the state 
for 100 seats in the House of Delegates and 40 
seats in the State Senate. "I hc^e that the public 
will demand that every candidate running for each 
General Assembly seat this year makes a public 
stand for or against a referendum on a state 
lottery. lUs way, those who (xppose a referendum 
wiJl Ibo^ an qptportunity to explain why they think 
ttK public should be denied a chance to vote on 
this important issue." 

He went on to say that he has been extremely 
encouraged, by the large volume of mail and 
phone calls in favor of a lottery, and believes it is 



also significant that surveys taken in some areas* 
of the state, where legislators opposed his bil^ 
have shown that a majcnity of people in those 
districts favor a referendum. 

Should the citizens decide in favOT of a state 
lottery, it would be operated under carefully 
contrdled conditions, much like that of the ABC 
Board, and would generate approximately $ 70 
millicm in new revenue to the state each year. 
Such large amounts of net revenue could be used 
fcff a variety of purposes ~ providing money for 
public education, easing burdens on, axpayers by 
providing mwe aid to localites, funding programs 
for the indigent, promoting mental health as well 
as programs for the elderlv. etc. 

O'Brien notes that thcMisands of Virginians 
ah-eady participate in games of chance such as 
bingo, raffles, supermarket and fslst food games, 
etc. "To contend that a lottery is going to corrupt 
anyone or promote gambling in Virginia is a 
distOTtion of the truth", said O'Brien. "Other 
states^ that have lotteries enjoy the benefits of 
milli(»is of ddlars of additional revenue and have 
had relatively few problems ~ certainly fewer 
problems than we have had in some localities with 
bingo." 



'f 



Milligan Is Fireman Of The Month 



Thb month's Rrefighter of the Month is instruct- 
or Jim.Milligan. Milligan, an eight-year veteran 
of th^epartment, has served his last three years 
in theTridning Division. In nominating instructor 
MilUgan. Captain Gary W. Painter cited, "Milli- 
gan's dedication aqd concern for the physical 
fitnevs Of his fellow firefighters is a reflectiai of 
the professional he is." 

Three years ago, when Chief Harry Diezel 
decided that a physical fitness program was 
nece^s^ for the department, he called upoi 
Milligan to devise the program. Jim developed a 
**PT" prc^ram which allowed every member of 
the department to participate. This "PT' 
prc^ram is still fimctioning in the department. In 
con^nction with the "PT' program, Milligan 
devised an agility test i<x firefighter applicants. 

Instriictor Milligan has served as the lead 
instructor in the department's Canpany In- 
Service prc^rams. In-Service prc^rams are held 
quarterly for each company and cover a variety of 
topics. 

Milligan derives his backgrcxind in physical 
fkness fi-om working fw three years in private 
health dubs. He designed fitness prc^rams for 
these clubs. Since jdning the Fire Department, he 
has attended courses at the Naticmal Fire 
Academy on "PT" prc^ramming for the fire- 
fighter. 

Milligan states that the biggest enjoyment he 
receives ft^om his job is "wwking with his peers." 
AltJiough be terns the program as successful, he 
"fceU there is still a lot of work to be done and, 
f« that reason, the commitment to physical 
fitness rou»t be a long-term one." 

Even his outsitfc interests represent Jim's 
cJedication to physical fitness. He founded and 
coaches the championship Virginia l^ach Fire 
CJepartment Tug of War team, TTie team trains 




MH^a 

extensively and has won the tugs at Harbo^fest 
and the Neptune Festival. 

Additiaially, Milligan has famed a three 
member partnership which teaches life instruc- 
tion to the industrial sector. Based cm an analysis 
erf the industry's needs, he will devel(^ a fire 
safety program fw the o-ganization. Qasscs that 
are taught include Emergency Situation Manage- 
ment, CPR, EMT, ot First Respcmder First Aid, 

Milligan, a native <rf South Bend, Indiana, has 
lived in Virginia feach since 1959. He and his 
wife. Anne, reside in the Windsor Woods seaiai 
of the Beach. 




The Old And New 



Hie old 1%xaco service station at the comer of 
Rosemont Road and South Plaza Trail has been 
razed in order to make way for • new Texacare 
convenience store center, similar to one wkich 
opened recently at the comer fA Rosemont and 



Holland roads. According to G.L dine, a 
cootractor, coottraclion shoold be complete in 
aroond 100 days. Pfctufcd above on dine's 
tractor arc ne^bborliood children CSatberine 
Kbrtin, 16, ib^ran Ckneni, 13, and Jobnny 
Wright, 12. 



Citizen-Of-The' Week 

Nicholson Helps Benefit Rescue Squads 



The Citizen-of-the-Week this week is Nick 
Nicholson, a 32-year Virginia Beach resident. 

Nicholson has. for the past seven years, hosted 
oyster roasts for the benefit of the oceanfront 
Virginia Beach Rescue Squad. Through the years, 
Nicholscm estimates he has raised nearly $100,000 
for the all-volunteer squad. 




Nicholson 



"There's no way you can describe the out- 
standing job those boys on the rescue squad do." 
said Nicholson. "They are continually going 
through schooling, keeping up with the latest 
medical advances. Still, nobody in the community 
pays any attention to them unless they are in 
trouble." 

Eight years ago, Nicholson was suffering from 
internal bleeding and was forced to call upon the 
rescue squad. "They did a great job," he said. 
"Butlift«r a^while, when I hadn't gotten a bill, I 
b^an to wonder about it. A friend told me I never 
would get a bill, either. That was when I had to do 
something to repay them." 

This year's turnout, around 700, "didn't go 
quite as well" as in year's past," said Nicholson. 
Previous year's oyster roasts had drawn between 
800 and 1,000 enthusiasts, including members of 
city council. This year, Nicholson said, no coun- 
cilmen were in attendance. 

"Maybe it was the economy this year," said 
Nicholson, discussing the $20 cover charge. 
"Also, our advertising wasn't as good as usual. 
The Virginia Beach Sun was the only media agen- 
cy that I saw which gave us any kind of coverage." 

Tagged "The Social Event of the Year," the 
annual oyster roast usually generates $9,000 for 
the rescue squad. Nicholson was unsure how much 
money had been raised from this year's roast, 
which was held two weekends ago at the Dome. "I 
do know this," he said. "Every nickel that was 
made went to the rescue squad. We didn't make a 
cent." 

Nicholson credit's the event's yearly success to 
his friends. "I've got guys who talk about this 
thing every single day of the year," he said, ad- 
ding that the event takes "a good three months" 
of preparation. Nicholson said he has put on 
oyster rc^st benefits for other groups, too. in- 
cluding the Freemason Baptist Church in Norfolk, 
of which he is a member. 

Nicholson and his wife. Marguerite reside in the 
Linkhorn Park section of Virginia Beach. He has 
liv^ there since 1951. For 28 years Nicholson 
owned Nick's Hospitality House on Laskin Road, 
which he sold last summer before retiring. "But, 
I've still got that place in my blood," he said. "It 
has the best seafood in town. I have to go there 
every day still." 



Farmer Appointed Telephone Co. Manager 



Milton G. Farmer was 
recently appointed 
Manager-Telephone Ser- 
vices and Lawrence Pitt 
was recently appointed 
Manager-Engineering and 
Construction for the 
eastern district of Contin- 
ental Telephone in Smith- 
field. The eastern district 
covers the Chancellor, 
Stafford, Bowling Grnn. 
Warsaw. Gloucester, 
Smithfield and Princess 
Anne serving areas. 

Farmer is responsible 
for the eastern district's 
Phone Fairs and business 
offices, installation and 
rei«ir, cable maintenan«. 
service center and swit- 
ching equipment offices. 

Since 1979. Fanner has 
been customer services 
manago' in Harrisonburg. 
He join^ Continental in 
1949 and held several 
positions in Bowling 
Green. Warsaw and 



Harrisonburg including 
staller repairperson, cen- 
tral office repairperson, 
outside plant engin^r, 
assistant division 
manager, division plant 
manager, district service 
maintenance supervisor, 
aiul district plant super- 
intendent. I 

Fanner's anc^ Pitt's new 
positions are the result of 
Continental's ne manage- 
ment reorganization, ef- 
fective January 1. Aaor- 
ding to Farmer, the two 
most significant changes 
are the creation of a tele- 
phone services department 
and the consolidation of 
geographic serving areas. 

Network service and 
customer services com- 
bimd to form telephone 
Mrvi<^. 

The phone company 
structural iu 92 exchange 
into three management 
districts. The northern 
district consists of the 



Harrisonburg, Manassas 
and Woodbridge service 
areas. The .southern 



district consists of 
Franklin, Emporia. Chase 
City and Amherst. 



Resort- Area Theatre 

Continued from Page 1 

Virginia Beach look to for innovation." 

One novelty of the place is its prices, ranging 
from $1 to $4 for admission, in most cases. 
"We're going to succeed because we are keeping 
the pri<^ low," said Saltzman. "In the hardest of 
tim« people still have to buy themselves a good 
time. Here we are vitally interest^ in family 
pr<^ramming at reasonable prices. A family of 
four can go out here and qjend under 10 bucks." 

S^tzman said the theater wiU benefit the resort- 
area community. "It will (^finitely be a good 
thing for all the business^ down here," he said. 
"Face it, whai somebody comes here for a 
vacation, there is simply not a lot for the famly to 
do at night. In fact, beside going to nightclubs, 
there is really nothing to do here. They probal^ly 
have a very dull time. We want to give the ocom- 
front some spark." 

Saltanan uui Clnnthes, native New Yorkers, 
haw be« |»rtnsi in Virpnia Be^h for 12 ywtfs. 



mrm 



'f 



Virsinia Beach Public Notices 



Virginia BMch Sun, March 2, 1983 13 




Ugallltliet 



UgallMiM 



Detccdvc Joha V^MwiltUn 



VanderHeiden Aims 
To Be 'The Best' 

Virginia Beach six-year dcte«ive J^n Vander- 
Heiden is ccnnmitted to "doing the best job I 
can," he said. "IMscovering who is i^sponsible 
for a crime and bringing them to trial." 

VanderHeiden, 31, has been a member of the 
Virginia Beach Pdice Etepartment for nine and 
one-half years. He has served in the Uniform 
DivisiMi, first and third precincts, and has been 
assigned to the plain clothes unit. He has served 
in the Sandbridge Beach Patr(4, first precinct. Ifc 
is curremly in the Investigative Division, where 
he has served in the juvenile bureau, but is now 
assigned to the robbery/homicide squad. He is 
a member of the Police Negotiations Team, whkh 
handles hostage situations, of which he has been 
involved in four. He is also a certified police 
instructor at the \4rginia Beach Auxiliary Police 
Academy. 

"VanderHeiden is an extremely conscientious 
and able investigator," said his commanding 
officer. Captain CD. Hathaway. 
Never Qye Up , 
One outsitanding lestimony lo Vaoderl^idien't 
competence as an investigator, can be illustrated 
by looking at an incident which occured last 
October when police officers and VanderHeicten 
responded to a call regarding a shooting at a 
house (HI Daniel Smith Lane, offl^wtown Road in 
the Bayside bo-ough. 

The house, vacant, was occupied at the time by 
20 to 25 pec^le playing craps. A nip joint business 
was also being conducted at the scene. Two men 
approached the fi^ont dxxx of the hwse fi^om the 
outside, attempting to break-in and commit an 
armed rc^bery. In their attempt to shoot through 
the door to get in, James "Pete" Boone, on the 
other side of the door, was killed. 

Three days later, based on probable cause, 
eyewitness accounts and statements, Vander- 
Heiden arrested a subject and charged him with 
murder, use of a firearm in coounission of 
a felcmy, and attempted armed robbery. 

The man spent 30 days in jail, naaintaining his 
innocence the entire time. 

There was reason enough to arrest and hdd the 
man, but "something didn't sit right" with 
Vander^iden. After numerous interviews with 
the subject, VanderHeiden was convinced the 
man arrested wasn't guilty. Soon thereafter, 
based on additional investigation and with help* 
fi-om Crime Sdvers, the first subject was released 
and the two alleged guilty subjects were 
apprehended by VanderHeiden. They are still in 
jail awaiting trial. 

S<»ictlnic Frwtrateg 
VanderHeiden enjoys his work, but limits at 
times it can be trying. 

He says he gets irritated "when the court 
system releases a man we kzuw is guilty, b's 
rather frustrating. 

"It's firustrating when you can't figure soum- 
thing or discover who's responsible for some- 
thing," he continued. "That makes it a chal- 
lenge." 

VanderHeiden said Virginia Beach residents 
are fortunate not tabe subjected to the high awac 
rates that infest some cities. 

"We're very fortunate to have low homicide 
and robbery rates, compared to the Qty ctf Norfolk 
for example," he said. "But they have a different 
type of enviraiment and eoMomy." 

"I l(we Virginia Beach," he cootiniwd. "It's a 
good environment and has probably tlK best 
pdice department in the state erf" Virginia as fiv «s 
I'm coicerncd. Everybody in tlw IMform 
ESvision strives to do their best. The Investig«ive 
Division supplements the uniform iMtroi. whidi is 
the b«;l*ooe crftlw defwtnieirt." 

Regarding his future, VanderHeiden said, "I 
hope to stay where I'm at currently; but I do have 
my eye on promotion." 

He is ah-eady a Master Polke Offitxr, and ha 
next rank wouU be Lieutenant. 

VanderHeiden is on call 24 hours a day, seven 
days a vwek; plus he worls shifts. He also goes 
out erf town about ona a year to interview 
bomidfte suspects or to bring Iwck prisonera. 

Vandertfciden, a tasebaD coKdh for the 
Woodstock Recreation LeagiK, is married to his 
wife Owryl, a hair stylist aai a vdunteer to 
Virginia Beach Crime Sdvera. Tbey live in the 
Kcmpsville borough d' the dty awl have coe 
child, Jdmny, II, a stwfent at Kem^ LawSat 
Elementary Schod. ^^^ 



LEGAL NOTICE 
Take Notice that on 
March 14. 1983 at lOKW 
a.m. at the premises of 
Udewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA Hall Pontiac CMC 
HcMida, Inc. 3IS2 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 23452, the 
undersigned will sell at 
public auction, for cash, 
reserving unto itself the 
right to bid, the following 
Motor vehicles: 



1979 Jeep Cherokee, 
Serial #J9AI8NN037894; 
1982 CMC Pickup, Serial 
#IGTCS14B9C2505844: 
1979 Jeep CX-7, Serial 
#J9A93AH833820. 



Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA Hall Pontiac CMC 
Honda, Inc. 
F. C. Rice 
Comptroller 
187-11 IT 3/2 VB 



LEGAL NOTICE 
""Take Notice that on 
March 14, 1983 a 10:00 
a.m. at the premises of 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA Hall Pontiac GMC 
Honda. Inc., 3152 
Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
23452, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, 
for cash, reserving unto it- 
self the right to bid, the 
following vehicles: 

1980 Honda Frelue, 
Serial ifSNB 2018879; 
1982 Renault LeCar, 
Serial #VF1AA39A4C0I0- 
1088. 

Tidewater Imports, Inc. 

DBA Hall Pontiac GMC 

Honda, Inc. 

F. C. Rice 

Comptroller 

189-5 IT 3/2 VB 

LEGAL NOTICE 
Take notice (hat on 
March 4, 1983 at 10:00 
a.m. at the' premises of 
Tidewater Imports, DBA 
Hall Pontiac GMC Hon- 



da, Inc. 3 132 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 23452, the 
undersigned will sell at 
pniblic auction, for cash, 
reserving unto itself the 
right to bid, the following 
motOT vehicles: 

1982 Jeep Jamboree, 
Serial #1JCCN87E6CT05- 
2037. 

Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA Hall Pontiac GMC 
Honda, Inc. 
F.C.Rice 
Comptroller 
187-12 IT 3/2 VB 



PUBUC NOTICE 



On Feb. 23, 1983, 
Atlantic Telecasting Ltd. 
partnership filed with the 
Federal Communications 
Commission in Washing- 
ton, D.C. an application 
for authorization to con- 
struct a new UHF 
television station to 
operate on Channel 43 in. 
Virginia Beach, VA with 
affective radiated tower of 
5000 kilowatts maxium 
visual and 500 kilowatts 
maximum aural. The 
proposed antenna site will 
be approximately 1.0 
miles north of city limits 
of Moyock, North 
Carolina (North latitude 
36*, 32 minutes, 57 secon- 
ds; West longitude 76*. II 
minutes, 21 seconds). The 
main studio will be 
located on a site to be 
determined in Virginia 
Beach. The general par- 
tners of the applicant are 
Mrs. Carletta Marie Lloyd 
and Mr. Larry L. Harris. 
The limited partner of the 
applicant is Mrs. Marilyn 
Goldman. Copies of the 
ai)plication, amendments 
and related materials are 
on file for public inspec- 
tion at Virginia Beach 
Sun. 138 Rosemont Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va. Mon- 
day through Friday during 
normal business hours. 
189-4 3T 3/16 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, March 16, 1983, 
at 7:30 p.m.. in the Council Chambers of the City Hall 
Building. Municipal Center. Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The staff briefing will be at 6:45 in the City Manager's 
Conference Room. The following applications will ap- 
pear on the agenda. 



REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. William TreschI requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building ad- 
jacent to a public street on Lot 35, Block 9, Section 7, 
Part 2, Aragona Village, 728 DeLaura Lane. Bayside 
Borough. 

2. Anita L. Murdoch requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
buikling adjacent to a public street on Lot 719, Section 
7, Malibu, 604 Wild Duck Key. Lynnhaven Borough. 

3. Wayne E. aiui Ida L. Fryman requesu a variance to 
allow parking of major r«:reational ^uipment in front 
of a building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjKxnt to a public street on Lot 6, Block B-B, 
Section 10, Lake Placid. 2461 Enchanted Forest Lane.- 
Princess Anne Borough. 

4. Itevid N. and Sherry L. Caldwell r«)uests a variance 
of 3 teti to a 5 foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet 
as required (acc«sory building - garage) on Lot 29. 
Block 22. Section 6, Arrowhead, 212 Miami R<^. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

5. Ruth K. and George M. Hagerman requests a varian- 
ce of 8 feetto a 5 foot front yard setback (61st Street) 
instead of 13 feet as previously approved by the Board 
of Z(Nung Appeals (Jum 4, 1975) and of 8 fttx to a 10 
fo(M sick yvd adjacent to a street (0(»ui front Avenue) 
instei^ of 18 feet as required and of 0.5 feet in foi- 
(x/wall height to 4.5 feet in fence/wall hoght instewl of 
4 fe^ in fence/wall hdght as allowed in a required set- 
bKk from a street (both 61st Street aiul Oceanfront 
Avenue) and to allow the 4.5 foot high fence/wall to en- 
croach into the ^ fom visibility triai^ at tte inter- 
ieciion of 6Ist Sava and Oceanfront Avoiue where 
I^obibited (swimming pod) on Lot 1, Block 7, New 
Virpnia Brach Corporation, 6007 Oceanfront Avenue. 
Lynnha^^n Bwough. 

6.Franklin R. Thcmias ra^iwsis a variance of 1 1 fe^ to a 
9 foot side yard «yac«nt to a streti (Shark Lane) instoul 
of 20 fwt as required ((teck and wctteaxd poxch) on Lot 
46, Section 2, Saadteidce BoKfa. 2245 Wld^m Lane. 
Princess Anne BMtHi^. 

7. Henry L. TlKMnpscm requests a variaii« of 8 f^t to a 
2 foot rear yard sAback (swtfi skle) inMcwi of 10 fe^ k 
requir«l and of I |»rking s^kx to 2 parking slopes in- 
st^ of 3 iMTking sf^^ as requirai fcv a dui^x on 
Lms 11 and 12, Block 8. Cbesaprake Park. 4484 A & B 
Oc»n Vkw Avoiue. Baysicte Borough. 



8. Mr. and Mrs. D. V. White requests a variance of 6 
feet in building height to 41 feet in height instead of 35 
ftti in building height as allowed on Lot 81, Section 2, 
Chesopeian Colony, Chesopeian Trail. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

9. Kenneth B. and Judith C. Sears requests a variance of 
12 feet to an 8 foot rear yard setback instead of 20 feel 
as required (residential addition) on Lot 3. Site 8, Pem- 
broke Park, 4436 Bennett Lane. Bayside Borough. 

10. Jack and Evelyn C. Hill r«]uests a variance of 7 feet 
to an 8 foot side yard adjacent to a street (Ticonderoga 
Road) instead of IS feet as required (accessory building 
- garage) on Lot 12, Block 7, Section 1, Pembroke 
Manor, 4713 Crown Point Road. Bayside Borough. 

11. 0(xan Point Properti«, Inc. requests a variance of 5 
feet to a 5 foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required of 1 side on Lot 13, Block 54, Shadow Lawn 
Heights, Close Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

12. Ocean Point Properties, Inc. requests a variance of 5 
feet to a 5 foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required of 1 side on Lot IS, Block 54, Shadow Lawn 
Heights, Close Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

13. Ocean Point Properties, Inc. requests a variance of i 
feet to a 5 foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required of 1 side on Lot 17, Block 54, Shadow Lawn 
Heights, Close Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

14. Ocean Point Properties. Inc. requests a variance of 5 
feet to a 5 foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required of 1 side on Lot 19. Block 54, Shadow Lawn 
Heights, Close Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

15. N. Stephen Smith requests a variance of 2.6 feet to a 
22.4 foot side yard adjacent to a street (Abington Road) 
instead of 25 feet as required (residential addition) on 
Lot 2, Block E, Section 2. Bay Colony, 1I3I Abingdon 
R(Mid. Lynnhaven Borough. 

16. Vallie B. Trent requests a variance to allow the 
parking spaces (2) to be 8 feel by 20 feet instead of 9 feet 
by 20 feet as required on Lot II, Chesapeake Park, 
Ocean View Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

17. John W. Garris requests a variance of 4 feet to a 6 
foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feel as required 
(covered steps) on Lots 12 and 13, Block 53, Ocean 
Park, 2320 Raleigh Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

18. S & S Enterprises requests a variance of 6 feet to a 1 
foot setback for a freestanding sign instead of a 7 foot 
setback as required on Lot "H", Parcel. 290, Eastern 
Park, 2976 Virginia Beach Boulevard. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

19. Robert D. 21ajack requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
15 foot side yard setback (north side) instead of 20 feet 
as required (accessory building - pool house) on Lot 2, 
Section 2, Linkhorn Cove. 1292 Alanton Drive. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. J. Christie Davenport requests a variance of 4.4 feet 

to a 15.6 foot front yard setback (Ocean View Avenue) 

instead of 20 feet as required and of 5 feet to a 3 foot 

side yard setback (west side) instead of 8 feel as required 

(possible 2od and 3rd story addition) on Lots 9, and 10. 

Block 17, Chesapeake Park. 4824 Bay Bridge Road. 

Bayside Borough. , 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 

BOARD'. 

Garland L. Isdell 

Secretary 

189-3 2T 3/9 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the Qty Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Oiambers of the Qty 
Hall Building. Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, March 
21, 1983, at 2:00 P.M. at which time the fdlowing 
applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of Dominion 
Building Corporation for a modification to the Land Use 
Ran of Tmberlake to include a commercial site of 1 .092 
acres located at tlx Southwest comer of Independence 
Boulevard and Foxwood EMve. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon i^plkation of ERA Amhokl & 
Company, Inc., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DBTRKT 
CLASSIFICATIC^ from R-8 Residential District to R-9 
Residential-Townhouse District on property kxated at 
the Northwest comer d l^incess Anne Road and 
Bellingham Road, running a distance of 131.54 feet 
along the North side of Princess Anne Road, running a 
distance of 156.41 feet akng the Western property line, 
running distance of 124.96 feet along the Northern 
property Ifaie and running a distance (rf 115.98 feet 
akng the West side of Bellingham Road. Sud parcel 
contains 16,988 square feet. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

3.An Oniinance upon AppUcation <rf Mrs. G.J. 
Oulbranson and Mn. latency Vest for a CHANGE OB 
TOSBKi DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION fi^om R-5 Resi- 
denttd District toO-I Offi<x District on certain property 
located on the North side d Provkience Road beginmBg 
at a point 260 feet more or less East of Indian Kver 
Road, running a distance of 600 feet along tlw North 
si(te of Providence Road, running a distance of 290 fux 
along the Eastern i^operty line, runiui^ a (Ustaiue of 
740 feet akng the Northern i^operty Une, ruoaiag a 
distai^e rf^ feet in a Southei^ direction, nmning a 
distance of 145 feet in an E»terly dire^ion and nuning 
a distaace d 210 feet in a Southerly dfaectkn. S«d 
paicclcCDtains 4.41 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUH. 

4. An Odinance upon Ai^lkiUion df Allen J. Oettel. 
ParUunent Building and Roger W. Gray for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DiSTRKT ClASSIFICATION from B-2 
Conununity-BusiiMss LXstrict to I-l Light bidustrial 
Ostrkt on certain property located wL the Nartbe«t 
interseokn d nincess Anne Ro»l aiKi PHurifauMnt 
Drive, running a distance of 757 feet more or kss ikm§ 
theNerthsideofnutiuwmOriw. runniiv a distaace 
d Itl^ feet akng the Eastern ptiperty Une, rumi]^ 
a distance ci 750 feet more or tess alav tlM Northern 
property Ime and running a c&tance of 204.% %»% 
akng ^ Western i»tiperty Vnt. &ud parcel coatam 
3.193 acres. KEMPSVILLE BCWOUCM. 

5. An OrdinaiKe upon Ap^xMtam of DnieiHMm, be. 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DBTRICT (XAI^FI- 
CAnON fhim R-5 Readentkl Dbtrks to A-l Apwtanat 



District on certain property located on tlw South side of 
Baxter Road beginning at a pdnt 1530 feet East of 
Prnuxss Anne Road, running a distance of 230 feet 
along the South side of Baxter Road, running a distance 
of 935.30 feet along the Eastern property line, running 
a distance of 181.80 feet along the Southern property 
line aiul running a distance of 805.30 fwt along the 
Western property line. Said parcel contuns 4.97 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
SUBDIVISION VARL\NCE: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

6. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements d the Subdiviskn Ordi- 
nance, Subdiviskm for Lillian B. Jdmson. Property 
k)cated on the East side of Avalon Avenue, 250 feet 
more or less South of Lancelot Drive. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
Plats with more detailed information are availabfe in 
the Department of banning. 
Ail interested persons are invited to attend. 
Ruth Hodges Smith 
aty aerk 
187-9 3/9VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the Qty (Doundl d Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chamben of the Qty 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia oii Monday, Mardi 
28, 1983, at 7:00 p.m. at which time the fallowing 
applications will be heard: 

CHANCE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATKMM: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1 . An Ordinance upon Application of Nelson P. TIbbitt, 
Jr., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFI- 
CATION from R-6 Residential Distri^ to A-2 Apart- 
ment District on certain property! located at the 
Southeast corner of Pembroke Boulevard and Witch- 
duck Road, running a distance of 715 feet along the 
East side of Witchduck Road, running a distance d 100 
feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance d 
262.08 feet in a Northeasteriy directkn, ruiuiing a 
distance of 169.8 feet in an Easterly direction, running 
a distance of 237.5 feet in a Northeasterly direction, 
running a distance d 40.12 feet in an Easterly 
direction, running a distance d 138 feet in a 
Northeasterly direction, running a distance d 101.70 
feet in a Westerly direction, running aidstance of 44 
feet in a Northwesteriy direction, running a distance d 
39 feet in a Northeasteriy directkn, running a distance 
of 65.90 feet in a Northwesterly direction, runnuig 
adistance of 84.80 feet in a Northeasteriy direction and 
running a distance of 256.94 feet in a Northwesteriy 
direction. Said parcel contains 7 acres more or less. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

V1RGINL\ BEACH BOROUCW: 

2. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Runnington 
Investment Corp., for a CHANCE OF ZCV^ONG 
DISTRICT ClASSIFICATION flrom I-l Light Ivdustrial 
District to B-4 Resort Commercial District on the^outh 
side of Pinewood Drive, 100 feet West d Mediter- 
ranean Avenue. Said parcel is located on Lots 17 and 
18, Block 8, Pinewood, and contains 6381 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH fiOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 

VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUOR- 

3. An Ordinknce upon ^pUcation.^ (rf Sea nnes 
Associates for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
temporary parking Id on certun property located at the 
Southwest corner of Atlfntic Avenue and 34th ^eet, 
running a distance of 210 feet along the "West sUle of 
Atlantic Avenue, running a distance of 130 feet in a 
Westerly directkn. running a distance of 90 feet in a 
Southeriy direction, running a distance (rf 100 feet 
akng the North side 33rd ^eet, runnhig a distance <A 
300 feet akng the East skle of I^dflc AveniM and 
running a distance of 230 feet along the South skle of 
34th Street. Said parcel contains 1.31 acres. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of John C. AspinwaU 
for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for mini-waie- 
houses on certain property kxated on the Soitth skle of 
Shore Drive beginning at a point 600 feet more or less 
West (^bKlependence Boukv^d, running a dntance of 
160.24 feet akng Uie South skfe of Shore Drive, 
running a distance (tf 531.65 feet akng the Western 
property line, running a distance of 40 feet ia ■ 
Southwesterly direction, nmning a (Ustance ci2S feet ui 
a Southeasterly direction runninj a distance (rf4I0 feet 
in a Northeasterly direction, nmning a distance of 413 
feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 
280.06 feet in a Northerly direction, nuinii^ a (Ustance 
oi 137.09 feet in a Westerly direction, running a 
distance d 1 17.34 feet in a Soittheriy direction, rumiiv 
a distance d 355 feet in a Westeriy directkn and 
running a distance of 260 feet in a Nortiwriy (Krectioa. 
Sakl parcel ontains 4.4 aaes. BAYSIDE WMOOOSA. 
PUNCX) BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance up<n AppUcation of John H. Md 
Thomas F. Gray for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
fm 2 singk family homes in the AG-1 Agricultural 
Dbtrict on tou kioted on the East nde of KikMU IslMd 
Road b^inning at a point 311.06 feet North <^ the 
Viiginia-North CaroUna State hoe, nmning a (UMMice 
of 15.64 feet along the East side of Katm» Uand Road, 
running a distance of 451.69 feet in an EMtcrfy dbac- 
ti(Mi, running a distuux of 472.94 feet in a Nothcrly 
direction, running a distance of 5'W.64 feet ia a 
WestCTly direction, running a distaiKC of 13.13 te^ 
along the East ^k of Kntms Islud Road, nuv^g a 
(Usance of 13^.40 fe^ atoi^ the NOTthoa property 
Une, running a distance of 520.82 feet akng the EMcra 
f^opaty Une and running a dittancx of 12SI.70 tttA 
akng the Southon fi^a^paty Uoc. Said pwc^ ofM^m 
13.5 acres. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
PUNCX) BOIUXJOH: 

6. Ai^wal from Decisran of Adnmstr^w Oflfeen ■ 
regwd to certain ekiaeMs of the ^tfitfTHfaa Okii- 
nanx, Subdiviskn for Jota R aad Than» F. 0^. 
Saki property is kxMed oa the But si^ of Kmam 
bland Road. 311.06 feet Nonh of the WgUa-Natt 
Ctfofaa Slate Uim. PUu with aaore de«d^ 



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16 Virginia Beach Sun, March 2,1 983 



Viroinia Beach Public Notices 



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niDRCiwtni^ 



PukUcNMring 



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t ion are available in the Department of Planning. 

PUNGO BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in 

the Department of Planning. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

City Qerk 

187-10 2T3/16VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Planning Commission will hold a 
Public Hearing on Tuesday, March 8, 1983, at 12:00 
Noon in the Council Chambers of the City Hall 
Buildings Princess Anne Courthouse, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. A briefing session will be held at 9:30 a.m. in 
the Planning Department Conference Room, 
Operations Building. PLANNING COMMISSION 
ACTION IS NOT A FINAL DETERMINATION OF 
THE APPLICATION, BUT ONLY A RECOMMEN- 
DATION TO THE CITY COUNCIL AS THE 
VIEWPOINT OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION. 
FINAL DETERMINATION OF THE APPLICATION 
- IS TO BE MADE BY CITY COUNCIL AT A LATER 
DAT£, AFTER PUBLIC NOTICE IN A 
NEWSPAPER HAVING GENERAL CIRCULATION 
WITHIN THE CITY. The following applications will 
appear on the agenda: 

DtFEltRED BY PLANNING COMMISSION FOR 30 
DAYS ON FEBRUARY 8. 1983: 
1. An Ordinance upon Application of R. G. Moore for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to R- 
6 Residential District on certain property located on the 
West side of Salem Road beginning at a point 1640 feet 
North of Elbow Road, running a distance of 379.97 feet 
along the West side of Salem Road, running a distance 
of 368$ feet along the Northern property line, running a 
distance of 1112.80 feet along the Western property 
line, running a distance of 2347.58 feet along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 554.7S 
feet in a Northerly direction and running a distance of 
703.29 feet in an Easterly direction. Said parcel contains 
66.2 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of R. G. Moore for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential Dis|rict to O- 
1 Office District on certain property located on the 
South side of Bonney Road beginning at a point 600 feet 
more or less East of Witchduck Road, running a distan- 
ce of 195.3 feet along the South side of Bonney Road, 
running a distance of 459.5 feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a distance of 186.9 feet along the 
Southern property line and running a distance of 514.9 
feet along the Western property line. Said parcel con- 
tains 2.1 1 acres. KEMPSVILLE^gpRqUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Applifft|fpi)\,pf Giwlafl^ •£, ftqi- 7 
mt.'if'.\^Hi<r1MiieU. and Nellie J. Callahan for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to B- 

2 Community- Business District on the South side of 
Haygood Road on Lot 30, Block 42, Section Nine, Part 
Two, Aragona Village. Said parcel is located at 4909 
Haygood Road and contains 8575 square feet. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

4. Application of Thomas C. Shubert, Jr., and Jane K. 
Shubert for the discontinuance, closure and bandon- 
ment of a portion of Lauderdale Avenue beginning at 
the Western boundary of Velzy Avenue and running in a 
Westerly direction along the Southern boundary of Lots 
17, 18, 19,^ and 20, Block 16, Chesapeake Park. Said 
parcel contains 6764.2 square feet. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

5. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Mrs. J. James Davis. Property 
located at the Northwest corner of Pinewood Road and 
Holladay Point. Plats with more detailed information 
are available in the Department of Planning. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

6. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Roy G. Earless and Richard W. Sct- 
zer. Property located on the North side of Scott Bend 
Lane, 200 f«t West of Garcia Drive. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

7. Appeal from E)ecisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Delia Lee Barton. Property located 
on the South side of Old Virginia Beach Road, 75 feet 
East of Realty Avenue. Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

8. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Ne^vsome Farm Associates. Proper- 
ty located at the Northwest corner of Connie Lane and 
Lawrence Drive. Plats with more detailed information 
are available in the Department of Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 

9. An Ordinance upon Application of Dr. Robert W. 
Waddell, Trustee for Virginia Beach Orthopedic 
Associates Employe Profit Sharing Plan for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
District to A-3 Apartment District on certain property 
located on the Northwest side of Witchduck Road 
beginning at a -point 490.45 feet Southwest of Ferry 
Plantation Road, running a distance of 203.77 feet 
a^oi^ibc Nortlw^-^ie of Witchduck Road, running a 
distance of 4S>4.99 feet in a Northwesterly direction, 
running a dMtance of 235 feet in a Northeasterly direc- 
tion and running a distance of 408.09 feet in a 
Southeasterly dir«:tion. Said parcel contains 2.476 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon Application of Margaret R. 
Mills and Garphine E. Smith for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CL^VSSIFICATION from R-« 
ResidaitilL Kitfict t<^ A- r Apartment Distrkt on cer- 
tain property located 4^2.75, fwt Eml of La«rraioe Drive 
Ijeginning at a point 304 ffet North and Daniel Smith 
Road, running a distnce of 333.50 feet in a Nor- 
theasterly directron' runninf a distance of 572 feet in a 



Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 356.38 
feet in a Southwesterly direction and running a distance 
of 570 feet more or less in a Northwesterly direction. 
Said parcel contains 5 acres more or less. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

1 1 . An Ordinance upon Application of S & B Proper- 
ties, Inc., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Residential District to B2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
located on the West side of Ccnterville Turnpike begin- 
ning at a point 503.72 feet South of Kempsville Road, 
running a distance of 207 feet along the West side of 
Centerville Turnpike, running a distance of 1 18.08 feet 
along the Southern property line, running a distance of 
229.64 feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a 
distant of 199.01 feet in a Northeasterly direction and 
running a distance of 114.47 feet in a Southeasterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 1.06 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. ^— ~ 

12. An Ordinance upon Application of Holland Proper- 
tics Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from I-l Light In- 
dustrial District to A-3 Apartment District on certain 
property located 200 feet North of Holland Road 
beginning at a point 906.40 feet West of Edwin drive, 
running a distance of 300 feet along the Southern 
property line, running a distance of 648.90 feet along 
the Western property line, running a distance of 292 feet 
along the Northern property line and running a distance 
of 676.20 feet along the Eastern property line. Said par- 
cel contains 4.5 acres more or less. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upon Application of Peterson 
Associates, Inc., a Virginia Corporation, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
District to A-1 Apartment District on certain property 
located on the West side of Kempsville Road beginning 
at a point 690 feet South of Indian River Road, running 
a distance of 122.50 feet along the West side of Kem- 
psville Road, running a distance of 270 feet more or less 
in a Northwesterly direction, ruhhing a distance of 95 
feet in a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 

" 500 feet more or less in a Northwesterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 350 feet more or less in a Nor- 
theasterly direction, running a distance of 300 feet more 
or less in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance 
of 200 feet in a Southwesterly direction and running a 
distance of 350 feet more or less in a Southeasterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 4.5 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

14. An Ordinance upon Application of Peterson 
Associates, Inc., a Virginia Corporation, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Residential Dislrict to A- 
1 Apartment District on certain property located 300 
feet moreryrless Weit^ Kempsville Road beginning at 
a poirUi90Q feft irjore or less SoiiA '6f Ihdian 'ftfver 
Road, running a distance of 800 feet more or less in a 
Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 500 feet 
more or less in a Northwesterly direction, running a 
distance of 800 feet more or less in a Northeasterly 
direction and running a distance of 500 feet more or less 
in a Southeasterly direction. Said parcel contains 9,908 
acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordinance upon Application of Robert W. 
Waddell, M.D,, Trustee of Virginia Beach Orthopedic 
Assoc., Inc. Employee Profit Sharing Plan for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to O- 
I Office District on certain property located on the 
South side of Old Donation Parkway beginning at a 
point 1049.26 feet West of First Colonial Road, running 
a distance of 813.73 feet along the South side of Old 
Donation Parkway, running a distance of 744.19 feet in 
a Southeasterly direction and running a distance of 
481 .91 feet in a Northeasterly direction. Said parcel con- 
tains 4 acres more or less. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upon Application of BOSDIM and 
Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to 
R-8 Residential District on certain property located on 
the North side of South Lynnhaven Road beginning at a 
point 1 16 feet East of Pritchard Road, running a distan- 
ce of 438.65 feet along the Noi-th side of South Lynn- 
haven Road, running a distance of 744.08 feet along the 
Eastern property line, running a distance of 450.58 fe^t 
along the Northern property line and running a distance 
of 720.62 feet along the Western property line. Said 
parcel contains 7.2 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon Application of Lynnhaven Nor- 
th Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from I-l Light Industrial District 
to B-2 Community District on parcels on the West side 
of Lynnhaven Parkway, North of Avenger Drive. 
PARCEL 1: Located 589.97 feet West of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 1300 feet more or less 
North of Avenger Drive, running a distance of 1412.09 
feet along the Northern property line, running a distan- 
ce of 634.43 feet along the Western property line, run- 
ning a distance of 134.68 feet in a Southeasterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 190 feet in a Northeasterly 
dir^tion, running a distance 0^47.51 feet in a South- 
easterly direction, running armtnd a curve in a North- 
easterly direction a distance of 655.90 feet and runnii^ a 
distance of 300 feet in a Northerly direction. 
PARCEL 2: Located 1732.50 feet West of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 250 feet more or less Nor- 
th of Avenger Drive, running a distance of 365 fwt 
along the Southern p'-perty line, running a distance of 
357.81 feet along the ' 'estern property line, running a 
distance of 209.23 feet m an Easterly direction, running 
a distance of 215 feet in a Southerly direction, running a 
distance of 165.71 feet in an Easterly direction and run- 
ning a distance of 84.35 feet in a Southerly direction. 
PARCEL 3: Located 399.99 feet West of Lynnhaven' 
Parkway beginning at a point 250 feet more or less Nor- 
th of Avenger Drive, running a distance of 1 1 1 1 . 16 feet 
along the Southern property line, running a distance 6f 
547.70 feet along the Western {»'operty line, running a 
distance of 386.94 feet along the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 504.13 feet in a Southeasterly 
directkm and runni^ a distance of 172.16 fed along the 
Eastern property line. Said parcels contain 24.2538 
acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

18. An Ordinance upon AppHcation of Lynnhaven Nw- 
Ih Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 



CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
District to I-l Light Industrial District on Parcels 
located West of Lynnhaven Prkway, North and South 
of Avenger Drive, and on the East side of S. Lynnhaven 
Road, North of Homespun Avenue. «»™ 

PARCEL 1; Located on the West side of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 243.99 feet North of 
Avenger Drive, running a distance of 399.99 feet along 
the Northern property line, running a distance of 239.71 
feet along the Western property Une, running a distance 
of 77.36 feet in an Easterly direcnon, running a distance 
of 210 feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance 
of 175 feet in an Easterly direction, running a distance 
of 188 feet in a southerly direction, running a distance 
of 155 feet in an Easterly direction and running a 
distarfce of 243.99 feet more or less along the West side 
of Lynnhaven Parkway. 

PARCEL 2: Located on the West side of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 498. 10 feet South of 
Avenger Drive, running a distance of 705.76 feet along 
the Southern property line, running a distance of 73.97 
feet in a Northwesterly direction, running around a cur- 
ve in a Northeasterly direction a distance of 1100 feet 
more or less and running a distance of 498. 10 feet along 
the West side of Lynnhaven Parkway. 
PARCEL 3: Located on the East side of S. Lynnhaven 
Road begihning at a point 100 feet more or less North of 
Homespun Avenue, running a distance of 914.35 feet 
along the East side of S. Lynnhaven Road, running a 
distance of 544.30 feet in an Easterly direction, running 
a distance of 408.89 feet in a Southerly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 165 feet in an Easterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 170 feet in a Northerly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 200 feet in an Easterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 238.89 feet in a Northerly direction, 
running a distance of 221.35 feet in an Easterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 172.30 feet in a South- 
westerly direction, running a distance of 65 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 3%.65 feet in 
a Southerly direction, running a distance of 120 feet in 
an Easterly direction, running a distance of 166.11 feet 
in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 100 
feet in a Southerly direction and running a distance of 
979.46 feet along the Southern property line. Said par- 
cels contain 24.2536 acres. LYNNHAVEN AND 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGHS 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

19. An Ordinance upon Application of Patrick L. 
Standing for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 3 
duplexes at the Southeast intersection of Lakewood Cir- 
cle and Mediterranean Avenue on Lots B, C & D, Lot 
104, Lakewood. Said parcels contain 16.161.7 square 
feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

20. An Ordinance upon Application of Creative 
Displays, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a 12' X 25' billboard on property located at the 
Southwest corner of Princess Anne Road and Seaboard 
Road, running a distance of 302.8 feet along the West 
side of Seaboard Road, running a distance of 280 feet 
inore or less along the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 360 feet more or less along the Western . 
property line and running a distance 19Q feet more or 
less along the South side of Princess Anne Road. Said 
parcel contains 1.78 acres more or less. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

21. An Ordinance upon Application of Shore Drive 
Associates for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
mini-warehouses on certain property located on the 
South side of Shore Drive beginning at a point 259.32 
feet East of Diamond Springs Road, running a distance 
of 509.46 feet along the South side of Shore Drive, run- 
ning a distance of 287.83 feet along the Eastern property 
line, running a distance of 640.81 feet along the 
Southern property line and running a distance of 276.14 
feet along the Western property line. Said parcel con- 
tain 3.631 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

22. An Ordinance upon Application of Thrift Car Care, 
Inc.. for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
automobile and small engine repairs on certain property 
located at the Southeast corner of Haygood Road and 
Aragona Boulevard, running a distance of 150 feet 
along the South side of Haygood Road, running a 
distance of 150 feet along the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 150 feet along the Southern 
property line and running a distance of 150 feet along 
the East side of Aragona Boulevard. Said parcel con- 
tains 22.500 square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

23. An Ordinance upon Application of Waco Equip- 
ment Company for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a bulk storage yard on certain property located at 
the Northwest corner of Rouse Drive and Mac Street, 
running a distance of 207.62 feet along the North side of 
Rouse Drive, running a distance of 218.4 feet in a Nor- 
thwesterly direction, running a distance of 100 feet in a 
Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 88.35 
feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 
330.61 feet along the Northern property line and run- 
ning a distance of 290.16 feet along the West side of 
Mac Street. Said parcel contains 1.64 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

24. An Ordinance upon Application of Ronald G. and 
Jeanne A. Komornik for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a home occupation (silk screen printing, 
numbering and banner making) on Lot 29, Block H-1, 
Bellamy Manor. Property located at 1 140 Cresthaven 
Lane and contains 14,800 square feet more or less. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

25. An Ordinance upon Application of Virignia Beach 
Racquet Club North Associates for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for renovation and expansion of existing 
recreational facilities to include locker rooms and grill 
on certain property located on the East side of Thcmias 
Bishop Lane beginning at a point 560 feet more or le» 
North of Great Neck Road, running a distance of 760 
feet more or less along the East side of Thomas Bishop 
Lane, running a distance of 130 fMt in a soutlwasto-ly 
direction, running a distance of 300 feet in an Easterly 
direction, running a distance of 330 f^t more or less in 
a Southerly direction, running a distam» of UO fe^ 
more or less in an Easterly direction, running a distai^ 
of 260 feet more or less in a Southwesterly direction and 
running a distance of 1030 feet more or tess in a 
Woterly direction. Said parcel contains 9.379 Kfcs. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

26. An Ordinance upon Application of Jack Rabbit 
Self-Storage/Hilltop for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for mini-warehouses on certain property 



located on the West side of Jack Rabbit Road beginning 
at a point 330 feet more or less South of Donna 
Boulevard, running a distance of 130 feet more or less 
along ihe West side of Jack Rabbit Road, running a 
distance of 174.98 feet along the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 119.45 feet along the Western 
property line and running a distance of 174.40 feet 
along the Northern property line. Said parcel contains 
19,166 square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
STREET CLOSURE: 

27. Application of Thomas G. and Irma C Hariy and 
Thomas M. and Rita K. Vojtek for the discontinuance, 
closure and abandonment of a portion of Lynn Shores 
Drive beginning at the Southwest intersection of Lynn 
Shores Drive and Rumford Lane, running a distance of 
161.34 feet along the West side of Lynn Shores Drive, 
running a distance of 35 feet more or less along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 208 feet 
more or less along the Western property line and run- 
ning a distance of 20.87 feet more or less along the 
South side of Rumford Lane. Said parcel contains 6,093 
square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
Plats with more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited to attend. 
Robert J. Scott' ■' ■'^- 
Director of Pianriirig 
187-7 2T 3/2 VB ' 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, March 
14, 1983, at 2:00 p.m. at which time the following ap- 
plications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

1 . An Ordinance upon Application of Tidewater Impor- 
ts, Inc.. for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from O-l Office District to B-2 
Community Business District on certain property 
located at the Northern extremity of Cranston Lane, 
running a distance of 250.58 feet along the Southern 
property line, running a distance of 338.36 feet along 
the Western property line, running a distance of 70 feet 
in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 
161.76 feet in a Southerly direction, running around a 
curve in a Southeasteriy direction a distance of 241.14 
feet and running a distance of 12.86 feet in a Southerly^ 
direction. Said parcel contains 30,579 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Nelson P. Tib- 
bitt, Jr., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
District to A-2 Apartment District on certain property 
located at the Northwest intersection of Oconee Avenue 
and Byrd Lane, running a distance of 220 feet more or 
less along the North side of Oconee Avenue, running a 
distance of 450 feet along the Western prope^y line, 
running a distance of 480 feet more or less along the 
Northern property line, running a distance of 330 feet 
more or less along the Eastern property line and running 
a distance of 200 feet more or less in a Southwesterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 4 acres more or less. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon application of Fred H. Feller for 
a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for recreational 
facilities of an outdoor nature (fishing) on certain 
property located on the Southeast portion of Lot B-20 
as shown on the plat entitled "Re-Plat of Rudee 
Heights, Princess Anne County, Virginia", dated 
December, 19S0, and which is located on the East side 
of Southside Road. Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of Gene S. Meekins 
T/A Jamco, for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
an auto parts store and muffler shop on certain property 
located on the South side of Laskin Road beginning at a 
point 250 feet more or less West of Village Drive, run- 
ning a distance of 130 feet along the South side of 
Laskin Road, running a distance of 250 feet along the 
Western property line, running a distance of 130 feet 
along the Southern property line and running a distance 
of 230 feet along the Eastern property line. Said parcel 
is located at 1837 Laskin Road and contains 32,500 
square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

5. An ordinance upon Application of George Tony 
Smith for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a single 
family dwelling in the AG-1 Agricultural District on cer- 
tain prcqierty locat^l 600 feet South of Sandbridge 
Road beginning at a point 6(X) feet East of New Bridge 
Road, running a distance of 730 feet more or less along 
the Northern property line, running a distance of 100 
feet more or less along the Eastern property line, run- 
ning • distance of 860 feet more or less along the 
Southern property line and running a distance of 370 
fMt na(»e or less along the Western property line. Said 
parcel a>ntaios 8.4 acres more or less. PRINCESS AN- 
NE BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

6. Af9C«l from Decision of Administrative Officers in 
r^ard to cotain etaneits of the Subdivison Ordinance, 
SubcUvision for Runnington Investment Corporation. 
Pn^pecty located on the West side of West Lane, 886.87 ' 
feet Nwth of Virginia B«ich Boulevard. Plats with 
more dialled infwmation are available in the Depar- 
tmoit of Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENT: 

7. Motimi of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Vtrginia Bach, Virginia, to ameiKi and reordain Sec- 
ti(W 4.^a) of the &ibdivision OrdinaiKX pertaining to 
eaMaoeats. M<He detailed infcmnation is available in the 
Departt^t of Flannii^. 

Plats with more <toailed information are avulable in the 

D^l>tftai«t of Ironing. 

AU JMooted powMB we invito! to attend. 

RuthHod^&uth 

Oty C3»k 

187-t2T3/2VB 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 1 983 1 7 



Classified Ads 



liWtr. 




JUNK CARS AND TRUCKS - 

Towed free. Some bought. CaJI 

485-l%l or 485-5859. 

ITFN 

NEED 28 people who would Uke 
to lose 7 to 15 pounds the Ut 
week and 5 to 7 pounds per week 
thereafter. Only th tnimis need 
to apply. CaU 487-9605. . 
14T2-23 

INCOME TAX - and Account, 
ing (including lax audiu). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent. 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Call 463-6608. 

ITFN 



XMAS BILLS 



12% 




how 
quickly 
you can get 
extra cash 
by selling 
with a 
Classified 
Ad. — 



Chesapeake Post/ 
Virginia Beach Sun 
Classified Ads 
Call: 547-4571 



ty 



r ri 

a U 



2.P«n0inb 



PIANO 
TUNING 

•25 
340-6077 



3.LMtAF«iiid 



r^ 



LOST - Manila folder with old 
pictures. Great sentimental 
value. Lost Great Bridge Shop- 
ping Center wea. Reward. Call 
'Ul-2866. 

' 34T3/16 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Homes <$ Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 
333 Providence Rd. 

CALL 464-9317 



4.AirtM 



4.AirtKi 



10> IMp wiiiti4 



3 



OrAByPHpowMMllyl 

Vlr^al«.NoitkCarollHi 

Or Many Other Slalct 

WITH GOOD CREDIT 

UP TO lOO^i OF VALUE 

RfTIN ANCE MORTGAGES 

Ut,2a4,Qr3ti'* 
la I 



BAD CREDIT 

UP TO M% OF VALUE 
GUARANTEED APPM)VAL 

WilkMnMcait^ly 
STOP FORECLOSURES 
PAY IR&JUDGEMENTS 

TURNED DOWN 

BY OTHERS} DONT OVE UP 

We m*i Pirttrit UmUm 

COMMERCIAL 

Property L4mw Alio AnUbMc 

ALSO WILL BUY 

MORTGAGE NOTES 

OPEN TILL 8 PM 

SAT. 10 TILL 2 PM 

CAPITAL ASSOCIATES 

499-}U4,4t»4U» 



PARTS - 1968 Skytark Buick. 
excellent engine and iran- 
sminion. S75 Ukes the whole 
car. Call Wednesday thru Sun- 
day at 427-l9pl. 
4TFN 

rORD . 1978, LTD II, radio. 

vinyl roof, automatic, dean, 

good ctnidition, retail book value 

S2923, asking S2.200. CaU 482- 

2246. 

, 44T3-2 

FIREBIRD - 1982 Special 
Edition, dark blue, T-top, 4 
speed, 4 cylinder, all dptions. 
Excelleni condition. $10,700. 
Call 587-8824. 

44T3-9 

TOYOTA - Corolla, 1975, new 
inspection, new tires, in good 
mechanical condition, does not 
burn oil, good mileage, body in 
very goo^ condition. SI595 
negotiable. Call 583-9343. 

4413-23 

CADILLAC - 1976 Coupe 
DeVille, Excellent condition. Ex- 
tra, extra clean. CaU 428-0068. 

44T3-2 



EARN $4.r7 HOUR — We need 

assistance in evaluating and 
responding to daily work reports 
submitted by our agents 
throughout the state. No ex- 
perience necessary; Paid to com- 
plete training. Work at home. 
For information send a self ad- 
dressed, stamped envelope 9'A 
inches long to AWGA. Depar- 
tment E. Box 49204, Atlanu. 
GA 30359. 

10 IT 3/2 



11. PmMwi* Wanted 



7. Motorcyctot 



3 



NEED CREDIT HELP? 

Receive a Mastercard or Visa, 
Guaranteed, Nobody refused, 
for free brochure send S.A.S.E. 
to House of Credit, Box 280570, 
Dallisi Texa^ 75228, or call 1- 
214-324*5944.- 

; ' 2413-16 

NEED- qREDIT HELP? • 

Receive f- Mastercard or Visa, 
Guaranteed. Nobody refused; 
for free brochure send S.A.S.E. 
to House of Credit, Box 280570. 
Dallas. Texas 75228 or call 
Anytime 1-214-324-5944. 
2>T3/t6 

DIET AND HEALTH SEEKERS 

Safest most effective diet and 
nutrition plan now available. 
AMA and FDA approval. In- 
dividual or group program 
guaranteed to build health. Call 
421-3116. 
24T3/30 

RECEIVE A MASTERCARD 

QWVi». Cimtntpal. nobddy 
re^swlr Ibr Jfm IbtmAtidall 
House of Credit, toU free 1-800- 
442-1331 anytime. 

2TFN 



SUZUKI - 1981, RM-IOO, Dirt 
Bike, only ridden a couple of 
months. Good condition. $700 
or best offer. Call days 545-4944 
or evenings 547-4779. 
7 41 3-2 



WILL DO IRONING - In my 

Deep Creek (Travelers Trailer 
Court) home. By the piece or flat 
rate. CaU 485-2242. 

. 114T3-2 

NURSES AIDE - Experienced, 
would like private duty hospital 
care, certified, references. Have 
own transportation. Call 399- 
4819. 

1I4T3-2 

WILL CLEAN YOUR HOUSE 

or Apartment. Reasonable rates. 

Call 466-9440. 

II IT 3-2 

GENERAL HOUSEcleaning 

reliable and expnienccd. C&' 
340-1389. 

IITFN 



10. Htip Wanted 



12. IminMS (HHMitwiity 



LIN<»LN - 1975, Town Car, 
excellMit condition. S2850. caU 
547-4825. 

44T3-23 

High Quality A( Low Price 

BABY 
BAZAAR 

IJahy liirniiurc b> DaN\cii 

Nursery Accessories 

S|ici lal <i»ns liw Spciial Bahics * 

KKIi lAV AWAY 

467-5032 

^, ISMI.yjMlMveaPliw). 
i iaCrfrciRM 

M-» l»4 Sal l«^ 



TELEPHONE SALES ■ M( Jr. 

ning hours, salary and bonuse s. 
No experience necessary. We 
train. Great for students and 
housewives. Call 627-1999. 
lOTFN 

SINCERE BOOK SALES ^ 

Agents wanted now, pari time or 
full, do not confuse with usual 
worn-out offer. No experience 
needed. For details send SI to 
Beech Sales, 4412-B, 
Schoolhouse Path, Portsmouth, 
VA 23703. 
I04T3I6 

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER 

General Superintendent. 
Medium sized and growing 
L, ,9ptW|j^cial/|indMstrial conlrac- 
;, {(^'sccl^ing mature self starting 
individual with indepih construc- 
tion knowledge and hands on ex- 
perience, must be capable of 
communicating with properly 
motivating job superintendent as 
well as communicating with 
owner/customers. Send com- 
plete resume to: L. White Co., 
Inc., 208 Hudgins Rd., Fred- 
ricks, VA 22401. All replies held 
confidential upon request. 

■ 10 5T 3/30 

PROCESS MAIL AT HOME - 
S30.00 per hundred! No ex- 
perwnce. Part or full time. Start 
immediately. Details, send self- 
addressed, stamped envelope. 
Haiku Distributors, 115 
Waipalani Rd., Haiku, HI 
967(W. 

_I0-TFN 

rCARPEn 

CLEANING 

BUAL ACTION STEAM 

CLEANING a«4 ROTANY 

COMBINATION 

—All WORK GUARANTErO- 

Uvi«f RosRi a Nail: 
SPtC»*L $|39S 

Additional Rooms *9** •• 
YsM Bysiness MeaM i lot UMe 

CAU 543-4830 



UNBELIEVABLE Opportunity 
- With Franklin Marketing 
Company. Extra income, no 
risk, minimum monthly invest- 
ment for super returns. Call 
Wayne at 547-2059. 

■■ 124T3-I6 



13. Ptto 



J 



LABRADOR RETRiKVER 

Puppies - registered, shots, 
dewormed, champion pedigree, 
super healthy. Call 1-793-7837. 
13 IT 3-2 

GOLDEN RETkHVER - For 

Stud, AKC registered, dark 
golden, 2Vt year old, champion 
bloodline. Choice of fee or pick 
of liner. Call after 5, 804-653- 
2051. 

' I3TFN 

STOP LIVING IN FEAR. 

Cotqplete Dog Training 3 mon- 
ths to 3 years. Licensed from 
largest K-9 Corp. in the nation. 
Call 481-6999. 
13-TFN 

OLD ENGLISH SHEEPDOG • 

Puppies, AKC registered, 
weaned in March, deposit wiU 
told. CaU 467-6269. 
13 413-2 

NANDAY CONOUR - Part 
hand tamed, young bird. Can be 
taught to talk, cage included. 
Moving must sell. S75. Call after 
6.497-6280. 

13TFN 



IkM^ 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



20 words or less - $4.40. Additional words • 22^ each. 
Please print clearly using one word per box. 




MkiMMnuaa 

MnM lOrMi M Mt MM. MPfT JttX 
wan WMCIK mu mi i>«li *mMc 

WOKS jiitt. iMPrr ju( mntmm. 

rm rn u t ftt M iiMMw If uj IVM i|hw 
Ml not mt mimim ■ Up art on « 






13. Pais 



SIAMESE KITTINS '■ Red 
Point, regiitcred; champioa 
liied, diow quaUty. S200. 4«1- 
3358 

ISTF^I 



GERMAN 8HEPARD Pup- 
piei - AKC registered, for pd 
or show. $150 and \p. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 
SHEPARK. CUI48S-WM3. 
13-TFN 



15. 



WHIRL POOL • Washing 
machine. S140. CaU after 6. Ask 
for Rick. 482'3326. 
. 15 IT 3-2 

DISHWASHER . Needa gasket. 

$25. CaU 420-77 19. 
— I5TFN 

DISHWASHEX • Sears Ken- 
more, poruble. Good condition. 
$100. Call 587-0275. 
15 IT 2-9 

STOVES • Electric, clean, 
guaranteed, $50 and up. Call 

anytime. 857-6552. 

154T3-2 



Gi 



16.Ai1lelaaFarSate 



SWIMMING POOL SUDE - 

$250, Galvinized Big T Gym set, 
S20. 3 by 5 black slate black 
board, $15. Call 420-7719. 
16TFN 

ELECTRIC HOSPITAL BE1>- 

Complete with mattress, 3 level 
buttons, head, foot & heighth of 
bed. Excellent condition. Orig. 
51200. One^ear old $600. Com- 
mode Chair -excellent condition 
$35.00. Call 427-1901 Wed. thru 
Sun. 

16-TFN 

METAL PYRAMID SHELVING • 

18 foot long, 4 feet wide. Some 
shelves missing. S25. Call 480- 
31 13 weekdays. 9-5. 

16 4T 3-30 



cz 



lS.Aati«Mt 



ANTIQUE KITCHEN - 

Wood/coal stove. Good con- 
dition. CaU days at 547-4571 af- 
ter 6 caU 485-4684. 
18TFN 

IVORY COLLECTION - 

Statues, Netslke, Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne neck- 
laces; Vaset and Boxes. 1804 
Granby St., 625-9119. Dtily 10- 

5. 

I8TFN 



If. 



GIRLS BIKES ■ 20 inch, $15. 10 
speed $35, 5 speed $25. CaU 420- 

7719. 

I9HTFN 









































4.40 


4.62 


4.84 


S.« 


528 


5.50 


5.72 


5.94 


6.16 


6.38 


660 



Please run ad for ., 

Mail to: 

Byerly Publications 
p. 0.80X1527 
Chesapeake, Va. 23320 



iKues, or until cancelled ( ). 



C<»t of single ad $ 

Number times to run 
Amount enclosed $ _ 



When Something Needs 
Building or Repaired, You Need 

BLACK 

BROS. 

Home Improvement 

Spctiali.sl.s 
• Btiildiiig('t>iiir:ici()i*RiM>r.s*C'arpi)rls*Ciariiges 
•Bath Remodeled* Rooni Additions 
•Aluminum Siding.s«Kitchcn Remo<teiing 

545-7318 

lli«kl-:.Mrii..Sr. 




Name 

Address 
City 



.s&te_ 



_zip. 



Your telephone number . 

AU Oi^^AtS ia« « TM 0«*««« KBT wo T»« IrtWHWA BEACH aJN 

For h^i witli your ^i^MMttfr^a^ call 547-4571. 



t 



■-•i.i-: 



Dean P. Eihnrds, Inc. 

Additions, Repain^ Concrete Woric 
and New Hon» Construction 
Guaranteed &itisf action & ; 
Quality Workmanship 

Ch^apeake: Chiter Banks 

804-421-9273 919-261-^01 



Zli TCMMMMnilfW 



32.lMlaMtrfrlMt 



4v. SMlnCM 



SEAIK STEREO - AM/FM, 8 
track, turn Ubk. $50. Call 420- 
7719. 

214TTFN 



ZZaMMvy 



STORiS AND STORAGE areas 
• AU sizes. Properties unlimited. 
Marvin Coldfarb. 399-8390, 484- 
1275. 

32TFN 



LAMES JEWELRY FtNl SALE 

hoe ImUci cocktaU rii^ with 45 
diamoiKU and is 14 carat ydlow 
|otd. Also a 14 carat white goUl 
23 jewd ladies Buiova watch. 
Ring appraised al $3400 and 
watch appraiaed at $1900. WUl 
idl either for half the appraised 
valiic. Call 547-0858 after 5:00 
P"- 22TFN 

14 KT GOLD HEART - With 
Diamond pendent, purchased at 
Fine Jewlery Store. Never worn. 
Can 623-4040. 

22 4T 3-19 



33. ApartRMRto Ftr RMt 



GREEN RUN - In Vir|iaia 
Beach, Apartments for adulu. I 
and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
2 bedroom townhouses. We pay 
heat and hot water. The Pines. 
Call 468-2000. 

^ 33TFN 

APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridie. 4 
locations, one and 2 bniroom 
apartmenu. From $260. Renul 
office, 482-3373, evenincs 482- 
1492. .^69 Johnstown Road. 

33TFN 



TAX RETURNS 

Dave Huff 

Accountant 

Call 481-2687 

Bookkeepini and Tax Planning 

IILJI id* 

ALL TYPiS ALTERNATORS 

and surters repaired. Battkneld 
Auto Electric. Call 547-3230. 

40-TFN 



24.WaRMT«lRy 



31. R«d Estate 



u 



TARLE SAW - Prefer carbide 
blade. WUl pay cash. CaU 627- 
50208 -5 p.m. Ask for I Jm 

CASH PAID - Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire housefulls. Also, good 
used furniture. Call 421-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 
24TFN 

rfUNK CARS Wr«;kcd or run- 
ning, cash-free towing. We alio 
buy used radiators and batteries. 
7 days a week. CaU 487-9222 or 
after 6p.m. 340-1059. 

24TFN 



HOME RENTALS - Urgently 
needed in the Tidewater area. Let 
us handle your property for per- 
sonal attention. Call EUcn at 
481-3177 or 481-0612. Letour- 
neou Realty. 

364T-3-23 



37.UttFtrSalt 



J 



^FA AND CHAIRS • brown 
and tan plaid, 3 cushion, sofa, 2 
olive green velveteen barrel back 
chairs, $75 each. Black vinyl bar, 
$50. 2 bean bag chairs, white and 
yellow $5. Call 420-7719. 
17TFN 

3 PIECE SOLID TEAKWOOD 

Stereo Cabinet - 85" long, lou of 
storage space for tapes and 
records. Has Sony reel-to-reel 
tape deck and Sony recdver 
SR605O, 30 watts per channel. 2 
Sansui speakers, SP2000. Space 
in cabinet for turntable. AU for 
S800. Can 588-5811. 

17TFN 



CEMETERY LOTS • Woodlawn 
Memorial Gardens, 2 lots in St. 
Lukes section. Paid $800 will seU 
for $700. Call 583-9343. 

37 IT 3-2 



38. MrMr Nrrms 



25.6MdTlihigtT»Eat 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS - 

Across from Hurd Seafood 
Restaurant. Shucked in own 
natural judes. By quarts, pinu, 
or bushels. CaU 340-5 171. 

25TrN 



HOLIDAY - 1975, excdient 
condition, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 
and appliances, new vinyl skir- 
ling, plus many exras. Moving 
must sell. Home must be moved. 
$9,400 or best offer. Call 468- 
WTOnrnb answer caU 42r-2176. 
38TFN 



3>. Prt fw R l tR al Unkn 



28« tRtoPtMRHMRt 



J 



FOR SALE-70 Ballroom dance 
lessons. Call Larry Dunn for 
more information 480-21 54. 
26-TFN 



29. Lawn A SirrfM 



D 



LANDSCAPING SERVICE - 

Lawn and Garden restoration, 
grading and seeding. Free 
estimates. 421-7350. 
28TFN 

CoauKrclal - Rcsideallal 
Laadacapiag Scrvkea 
TORO Sprinkler Systems In- 
stalled. North Landing Nursery 
(Next to Farmers Market), 
Virginia Beach. 427-6886 
29TFN 

JOYNER PROFEitSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and lawn ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-4949. 
29TT I 

IT'S SPRING Planting time! 
Free copy 48 page Planting 
Guide-Catal(% in color, offering 
one of the most complete lines of 
fruit trees, nut trees, berry plan- 
ts, grape vines, landscaping plant 
material. Waynesboro Nurseries 
Inc.. Waynesboro VA 22980. 
29 4T 3-30 

MULCH-aUTLEX AND 80K 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get Km 
while on sale. We ddiver In one 
day. 853-0250 or 855-7467. 



INCOME TAX - and Account- 
ing (induding tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd., (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Call 463-6608. 
39>TFN 

BOOKKEEPING - Monthly 
balance-sheet, P & L detailed 
trial balance from your checks 
and recdpu, stubs, or register 
tapes. 94rs and VA-5's. Up to 
200 checkbook transactions 
monthly: $45. Payables, recdv- 
able, small payroU. Cheupeake 
only. Call 420-6623. 

39-TFN 

BOOKKEEPING SEk«.«.., • 

Including quarterly payroll 
reports and bank accoum recoi^ 
dilation. Specializing in small 
proprietorships. Pick up and 
delivery. Retired professional. 
Call 4^5624. 

39TFN 



40.Servicci 



— SHOAL LM RATE — 



PUNMHW - OECrillCM 

CMKMTRY - fumm 

Pool Service and Supplies 

tunm tmtirma ■ [>a)n/Eya: 

34MWI 



BOOKKEEPER • WUl do books 
in my home. Experienced in 
payroU and quarterly returns. 
Pick-up and delivery service. 
C4U 545-4096 after 5 p.m. for 
more information and rates. 
40WTFN 

TYPING SERVICE - For 

businesses and individuab. 7 
days a week, IBM Sdectric. 
Reasonable rates. CaU diher 
467-7112, KempsviUe area, or 
463-0236, Hilltop/Pembroke 
area. 
40TFN 

INCOME TAX SERVICE • 

Over 25 years combinnj ex- 
perience, low tax fees, same day 
service. Call Commonwealth for 
free estimate, 461-4508. 

40rr4.« 



HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 

Rooa wMittona for all 

parpogci. Convert 

ptn^, raigc dorawr*. 

Any type of improv- 
OMBt. Bathroom and 
Kitchen remodeling. 

R.H. BLACK 

3994359 397-7Tn 



lOMIV 

SOAP 



J09 M* UeCHMT 

MMfM 




COLONIAL EXTERMINATING 



OF TIDEWATER 
397-4397 



1 

Any RoflCri TfMiMVRM 



• FmeaaUnA tern li^as •iMRflHs 

• Iti^fttm • Fnsteittaf, etc 




"T" 






J 



BARYl ITTING - Regular basis, 
exccUeni care, hot lunches, and 
snacks. Lots of attention. 
Sparrow Road area, call 420- 
42S9. 

42 4T 3-16 



41. 



u 



CARPENTRY, PAINTING. 
ROOiING • and aU typa of 
maintenance. Storm windowsr 
guttcn aiMl Kreens re[»ired. 
Free estimates. Sanden Con- 
struction. 420-8453. 

41TFN 



47. 



AOOmONS • Rooms, garai^, 
convert garages, decks, etc. 
Quality work by a licensed 
builder. Free esttnutes. CaU 340- 
2311. 
47TFN 

ADDITIONS, ROOHa- car- 
pentry, roofing, siding, storm 
window, storm doors, plastering, 
dectric, concrete work, plum- 
bing, guttering, remodding, kit- 
chen and baths, brick ind block ~ 
work, aluminum siding, 
fireplaces, carpeting painting, 
speciaUxing hi parking areas aad-- 
driveways, all type of 
demoUtion, free estimate without 
obligation, prompt service. Ser- 
ving all of Tidewater. Bonded 
and Insured, Sute Registered. 
CaU 625-7435, 623-6I48, or 499- 
5516. 

47-TFN 



^v» Mvvi^^ w NBHNI^ 



ANDERSON ReM<N»UNC • 

AU typa of home repairs. Pain- 
dng. rooring, siding, carpentry, 
etc. Work guarantAd. Free 
estimates. Insured and bonded. 
CaU 588-2558. 

49TFN 



51. 



D 



WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING-Fast and friendly 
service, local reference* fur- 
nished. Call us for a Utt 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contractus. 420- 
34?l. 
5ITFN 



PAINTING - Lar^ or small 
jobi. Interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prifies. References availabk upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1423. 

51TFN 



S2. 



THE LEIGH PHOTOGRA- 
PHIC SERVICE - Offers fuU 
coverage of your needs at your 
wcdiUng. Please caU for more in- 
formation and open dates. 482- 
1312. 

S2-TFN 



RATHROCNM REMMMEUNG • 

<M and new. ^edaliziiw in 
ccrmic tUe walls and floor 
covering. Reasonable rates. Free 
ettSBae*. 20 years eipericace in 
lUcwttcr ««a. SnaU and large 
iobt. OiiaraMae all work. CU 
V«7-4774aayttac. 

S5TFN 



SCARS SRWINC MAOONES - 

livMi oMnct, $75. I wMout 
caMndttS. CaU 420-7719. 

3«TFN 




iBMmmMiaaaaaai 






^mmmfmm^^m^^ 



1 8 Virginia Beach Sun, March 2, 1983 




Dealership Serving Tidewater For Over Fifty Years. 



Optimism Abounds At Perry Buick 




"We've made a profit 
every year we've been in 
business, and we will 
again this year." That 
statement is certainly 
typical of the optimistic 
view that has beenMaken 
for over fifty years by''the 
man who made it, Aubrey 
H. Perry, St., board 
chairman, Perry Buick. 

As one would imagine, 
the son, Aubrey H., Jr. 
speaks with as much 
enthusiasm, and remains 
as optimistic about the 
future of Perry Buic k." 
We have^ eltcellent pro- 
duct engineering, quality 
and appearance, and we 
believe through these we 
will increase sales," Perry 
Jr. stated. 

"Furthermore, the 
present demand for new 
cars is as good or better 
than its' ever been, and the 
reduced interest rates will 
do a lot to attract the buyer. 

The annual vehicle scrap 
has reached enormous 
proportions with close to 9 



million cars towed to auto 
graveyards annually. 

"Those cars have to be 
replaced," said Aubrey 
Jr. recently. When people 



keep their cars longer, he 
said, a dealer's sales are 

helped by the extra servic-, 
ing the older vehicles 
require and by surging 



parts sales. 

The Perrys' are even 
looking forward to an 
expansion program which 



SPECIAL PRICES ON ALL CUSTOM VANS 

*8783*" 



AS LOW AS 



NO ONE ANYWHERE WILL OUT 
SELL OR OUT TRADE VIRGINIA'S 
LARGEST VAN DEALER. 




y^^ 




463-6100 



fir ...^ 

mils, ^^^fm^.- >- '^••>«««nWHMHi^H 



3443 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Next To Princess Anne Plaza 

DMV8S02 



WYNNK MOTOR 
CORP. 



I3.(><>5 



^9.695 



WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY SALE 

RK CHEVROLET 

COMBINES 

$1600* 



MINIMUM TRADE-IN 
AND 



I2.55'> 



10.895 



6.995 



n.9% 



GMAC 
FINANCING 



6.39: 



SI \M I M 



^.595 



M,895 



\^,H95 



^7,495 



! MONTH. 



\V\NM \!OM)R(()RP. 



NEW 1982 
CORVETTES 

Collectors' Edition 
& Regular Corvettes 

2 % OVER 

DEALERS COST 
MMiy io dwoK (ram! 



NEW 1982 

C-10 

mCKUPS 

Stock » 7434 
■vy At *0f 7/5 



MUM m (N KUNNtf. 
} Mli^t PASS Vft STA 

RlC 



NEW 1983 

DIESEL 

CHEVETTES 

Stock II368 

'6,875 

raure 1 3 year GM 
WARRANTV, 60 MPG »/5- 



Niw ma 
NioiinaiLo 



^m Miiir to ctnoM fram.l 
At 



•7,975 



will include three rther 
"experienced, trained, 
and quite capable 
Perry's," Aubrey H. 
(Buster) Perry III, general 
manager of Perry Buick; 
James M. Perry, new and 
used car coordinator, and 
Walter A. Perry, new car 
manager. The Perry name 
has virtually beccnne a 
household word in Tide- 
water, having served the 
area for over 51 years. 
The central location, com- 
pany reputati(m, capable 
service crews and aggres- 
sive advertising cam- 
paigns have all contri- 
buted to their success 
over the years. 

The Perrys' them- 
selves, attribute much of 
their success in a bad 
economy to repeat busi- 
ness by faithful customers 
and Perry Jr. said it all 
this way last week; "we 
have a human relationship 
with our custoners and 
that's what keeps us a 
step ahead of the competi- 
tion." He further stated 



that the excellent reputa- 
tion the Perry dealership 
has maintained over the 
years fw service and 
"keeping their word" cm 
promises to customers is 
probably responsible for 
Perry Buick's ability to 
retain those "faithful cus- 
tMners." 

From the Great Depres- 
sion to today's economic, 
woes, the Perrys' have 
seen it all. They remain 
steadfast in their belief 
that the Golden Rule has 
its application in business 
and is prdubly as respon- 
sible fo" their longevity. 
But, the Buick name is a 
big part of it all they 
readily admit uid this 
year's selection offers the 
finest technology and 
engineering they've seen in 
a long time. 

From a handful of 
employees over fifty one 
years ago to a present 
staff of over 80 and with 
assets that have grown 
from S32,000 (and the 
need to borrow), to assets 



of over S2 millicm in 
buildings, land, equip- 
ment and inventory- 
Perry Btdck— 6633 Vir- 
ginia Beach Boulevard — 



(near Newtown Road) in 
Virginia Beach— seems 
solidly entrenched in the 
higl\j£ COTipetitive Tide- 
watertfcw car dealership 
market. 



OUTSTANDING SALESMEN 




Jim Pearce has been 
recognized by Perry Buick 
for his outstanding sales 
performance for 1982. 

Jim is a Virginia Beach 
native, has been with 
Perry Buick for the past 
five years and has received 
the Sales Master Award 
from Buick for 5 con- 
tinuous years. 

Jim would like to invite 
all his friends to stop by 
and let him show them the 
new Buicks. 



Joe Abrami has been 
chosen by Perry Buick as 
1982 Salesman of the year. 
Joe, who is a native of 
New York, has been living 
in Virginia Beach for the 
past three years with his 
wife and daughter. 

Joe has been with Perry 
Buick for 3 years ^d has 
won the Buick Seals 
Master Award for 1982. 

Joe extends ^n in- 
vitation to all his friends 
to stop by and let him 
show the 1983 Buicks. 



Perry Buick 




461-8855 



Presents The 

1983 

Buick Full Line 



PERRY BUICK 



M33 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
IN NORFOLK AT NEWTOWN ROAD 



SEltViNG TIDEWATER OVER 52 YEARS 





First Time Ever! 



NOW AVAILABU 



*.l LITIM MIMN.. 





KLINE Chevrolet 



1495 S. Military Highway 

3 Miles South Of Military Circle 424-181 1 



TO««ll Vt MISIL P9\ 
m STANB ARD4III VANS. 






486-2222 




You don't give up 

a thing at Budget where you're H 

• Low rates by the day, weekend or longer 
• Free pick up and delivery 
• Most major credit cards honored 
• For oat-of-town rcservatioM, toU free- 
dial "1" A UiM 800-527-07M 
FOR LOCAL RESERVATIONS CALL 

Norfolk latemalioml AiriHHl - Norfott, Va M5 MM 

MM N. Mlliliry Hwy. - Norfolk, V« MS-M3S 

3316 Vir^aia Beach Blvd. ■ Vh^ria IcKk, Va 34044U 

PaMck Hrary Airport ■ Ncwpwt Newt, Va tfASn* 

114M JcffMSoa Ave. - NcMrpwt Newt, Va Sn^31S2 

im Po«ihoala» Trail - WHIImri»ig. Vs. ,^ . ,„_, .,2M45» 




11.9% 

Financing 



On All New 

Pontiacs and 

Volvos 

Parkway 



Salute To Virginia Beach Agri-Business Commi 



('■K 



Pas* 



The Vir g inia Beac 

S7tliYear.No.10.VlralaiaBncb.Va. ^^^m^ Mir* 9, 1983 



^"••^^^ 






I 



S7tli Year, No. 10, Virslaia Beach, Va 



ZSCcRU 




Pulling The Plug: 

Humanitarian Act Or Playing God? 



The consensus of most local 
authorities is that the *' Natural Death 
Act'' places breath of hope in terminal 
patients. 

By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

Louise Sariaa, a resident of Virginia Beach's IjriiB 
Shares Manor nursing home, remembers the pain 
suffered by her first husband during his long bout with 
cancer. 

"I had to give Ralph medicine with a hyperdermic,' 
and I'm sure he would have chosen not to go through 
with the treatments if he ctwld have," said Sarian. "In 
fact, on many occasions he'd say to me, 'Leave me 
alOTC. Let me die.'" 

More than 20 year's later, Sarian's second husband, 
Steve, also died of cancer after nearly two and oie-half 
years of treatment. "It was a hwribly painful thing for 
him, and I hated to see him put through it," she said. 



Sarian, now in her M's, has recently suffered two 
heart attacks. Drawing on her experiences with her 
spouses, she knows that she does not want her life 
prolonged by artificial means. "Keeping somebo^ 
alive by artificial means is cruel to the persoi and to the 
family," she said "I beUeve that life is scared, but life 
is also your own. If I could trust the doctor when he tdd 
me there is no realistic hope for survival, I'd ask him to 
pull the iriug." 

Terminally |tt>^inians will soon have the option to 
request remo^ of artificial life supp<xt systems if Gov. 
Charles S. Robb signs into law a bill recently approved 
by the General Assembly. Virginia would become the 
fourteenth state to adopt this type of law. 

House Bill 329. "Hie Nattiral Death Act," was 
passed during the last week of the 1983 legislative 
session by a 59-37 House vote. The bill had previously 
received approval by the Senate, 21-18. Robb is 
expected to endone the measure, according to a 
spokesperson. "The govemcH' has said he is aware of no 
major pdice differences with the General Assembly," 

See OFFICIALS, Page 4 



If Convicted 



New Bill: If You Hit 
A Cop, You Go To Jail 



After hundreds of assaults, one 
death, legislators finally stiffen the 
penalty for attacking police officers; 
Governor expected to sigh the bill, 

ByGregGoldfarb 

Sun Editor 

The word is out. If somecaie is convicted of hitting a 
Virginia Beach cop, they go to jail. 

TTie Virginia General Assembly recently passed 
House Bill 220. Basically, the bill has three main 
provisions for handling assaults on pdice officers: 

•If a persOT is cOTivicted of maliciously injuring a 
pdice officer while on duty, that means injuring the 
officers with the intention of maiming, disfiguring, 
disabling or killing, that person shall serve a minimum 
of two and up to 20 years in prison. An example of this 
situation would arise if a subject, verbify and . 
physically abused a police officer, threatened him, and 
then cracked his head c^n with a baseball bat. 

•If the subject didn't say a ward, and unlawfully, but 
not maliciously, cracked a pdice office's head open 



with a baseball bat, if convicted, that person would 
spend a minimum of one. and up to five years in prison. 

•If you're in a fight in a bar and hit a pdice officer, 
but dai't break the skin, if caivicted, the charge carries 
a minimum of sx OMmths and up to a year in jail, 
^f the Governor signs the bill iwK> law, it woirtd i^ 
intoeffect July 1, 1983. 

Acceding to Pbil^ Abraham, Governor Oiarles 
Robb's spcdal assistant for policy. Robb is not 
commenting at this time on which specific bills he will 
or will not sign. Abraham did say, however, that Robb 
is "aware of no maja- pdicy differences with the 
Cieneral Assembly." 

Too Many Deaths 

Over the years \rirginia Beach has lost six police 
officers while they were in the line (rf duty. Two were 
lost in a helicopter accident; two lost in a scuba diving 
accident; cme was lost in an automobile accident; and 
most recently, in IWl, Daniel MalOTcy became 
Virginia Beach's first police officer to die a vident 
death. 

Total number of attacks on pdice officers ranges 
from 86 in 1973 and '77 and up to 1S6 in 1981 . 

See I. Pages 




Assaults On Vimnia Beach PoUce Officers; 
Yearly Total And During The Summer 



Year 


Total 
Assaults 


June 


July 

9 


August 


Three 

Month 

Total 


%0f 
Summer 
Assaults 


Killed 


1975 


86 


10 


f 

7 


26 


30.2 




1976 


93 


7 


12 


10 


29 


31.2 




1977 


86 


8 


13 


IS 


36 


41.8 




1978 
1979 


96 
95 


8 

10 


13 
8 


1 

11 

11 


32 
29 


33.3 
30.5 




19M 


120 
156 


M 


9 


16 


39 


32.5 




1911 


14 
12 


19 
10 


12 


45 


28.8 


1 


19S2 


112 


14 


36 


32.1 




19S3 

(thniJu.) 

Total 


12 


• 


* 


• 


♦ 


¥ 




856 


83 


93 


96 


272 


31.7 


1 


• Flgwcs Not Available 








' 



Number Of Virginia B^h Police Officers 
Assault^ More Than Once 



One 
Year Time 



Two Three Four Five Sbi Seven Eight Nine 
Times Times Times Times Times Times Times 



1980 



93 



19 



1981 



124 



18 



1982 



15 



Total 



306 



52 



16 



Figures mppUed by Sai^y make, steristictan, Servka DtvUem, nrgMa Btaek PeUeeO^Mvtmmu 



A Clean Block 



KcHiKlk Vanii. a sophomore at Princtn Ann* High Sckool. U practking wHh 21 ot hte Cavalier 
IMauMtts In preparallon tor Ihcachooi's varsity M>cctr opener March IS at Norview High School 
In Norfolk. The tNi» dtiwtt at home Ma/ch 25 iig«lp&t«o«ker T, WanhUglon. Finl-yew cosch 
Ken Whitlej predlcli P.A. will improve m 111 IM2 record of omt wla ami II Iomm. "Wt'vt got 
some pretty good alhlelea, so I'm sure we're bound to improve," he noted. Baysidc, he said, is the 
team to l>eat this year. 



Rotarians 

Honor 

Roche 

Diane C. Roche, fire 
education specialist for 
the Virginia Beach Fire 
Department, was herald- 
ed recently as the 1982 
aty Employee of the Year 
by the Virginia Beach 
Rotary Qub. 

Roche was presented a 
plaque by Vice mayor 
Barbara M. Henley at the 
club's weekly meeting at 
the NTirginia Beach Pavi- 
lion. On hand for the 
ceremony was Qty mana- 
ger Thomas Muehlcnbeck 
and Deputy Chief W.R. 
"Bill" Gurley, Sr. of the 
fire department's fire pre- 
vention division. 

Roche was hired in 1976 
to develop and present a 
fire safety education pro- 
gram to fifth grade 
studenU. "Virginia Beach 
now has one of the best 
fire education programs in 
the country," according 
to the nomination 
document submitted by 
Fire Chief Harry Diezel. 
zel. 

Roche, hdder of a 
Bachelor of Science de- 
gree in education from 
Dlinois State University, is 
affiliated with the Natio- 
nal Fire and Bum Educa- 
lion Association, the Na- 
tional Fire Academy, the 
Natiaial Fire ProtecticHi 
Association, the Interna- 
tional Society of Fire Ser- 
vice Instructors, and the 
U.S. Fire Administration. 
She has spoken at more 
than 50 Fire service con- 
ferences in 23 states. 

See ROTARIANS, Page 14 



Police R.A.I.D. Drunk Drivers 



Despite increasing its 
drunk driving arrest by 93 
percent last year, the 
Virginia Beach Police De- 
partment is "missing 
more drunks than we are 
catching," according to 
Police Chief Charles R. 
Wall. 

"We need every bit of 
help we can get," Wall 
said at a recent press 
conference. The meeting 
was called to unveil a new 
program in which citizens 
are being asked to repot 
motorists suspected of 
being inebriated. 

Known as "Operation 
R.A.I.D. (Report All 
Intoxicated Drivers)", the 
program is slated to begin 
immediately. Wall asked 
that anyone seeing a sus- 
pected drunken driveri 
telephone the pdice de- 
partment's 911 emer- 
gency number. Qspatch- 
ers will then alert all 
patrolling officers of the 
car's description and last 
location. Wall said, 

R.A.I.D. is the latest 
phase of a drunk driving 
crackdown Wall initiated 
more than a year ago. 
Wall reported that the 
prt^ram's maiden year 
yielded several significant 
statistics, including: 



•Vir.ginia Beach's traf- 
fic fatalities were down in 
1982, from 32 in 1981 to 23 
last year. This was the 
biggest decline in auto- 
mobile deaths compared 
to other Tidewater Cities 
including Norfdk, Ports- 
mouth, Chesapeake, New- 
port News and HamptOT. 
Norfolk and Chesapeake 
experienced increases in 
traffic fatalities. 



•Virginia Beach's 93 
percent increase in D.U.I. 
arrests in 1982 cOTipared 
to 1981 led all other 
Tidewater cities. Virginia 
Beach's total of 1,830 
D.U.I, arrests in 1982 led 
fcHir other cities in south- 
side Hampton Roads, and 
was second only to New- 
port News, which had 
2,734 DUl arrests. 

Wall said he hc^d 



Project R.A.I.D., the first 
of its kind in the state, 
would aid police. "If 
you're out driving drunks 
and you think there are 
more eyes out there than 
the police, it's bound to 
make you think twice," he 
said. 

Councilman Harold 
Hcischober, who owns 
Pembroke Mazda Chrys- 
See PUBLIC. Page 6 



Operation R.A.I.D. 





Report All Intoxicated Drivers 

In Virginia Beach call 911 



Logo for the new police departmmt campaign. 



Council Monbers Discuss 
Use Of Executive Session 



By Lee Cahill 
Sun Council Reporter 

It was the only vote of the day that was not unani- 
mous, but that one 7-2 vote of Virginia Beach City 
Council made up for all the rest. ' 

Vice Mayor Barbara Henley and Oouncilwoman 
Meyera Obemdorf voted against having an executive 
session to discuss legal ramifications of an item on the 
floor during the formal sessiai of Owncil Maiday 
afternoon. When they were cMtvoted, they refused to 
Utend the executive session. 

See COUNCIL. P^e 7 



lusida Iha toa 



Virginia B«acli 

A day-by-day list of activities going on 
in Virginia Beach over the next week - 
Page 3 

¥•!«• Off Hm PM|rf« 

Do Virginia Beach Residents favor 
more or less gun control? • Paged 



A complete summary of all actions 
taken this week by the Virginia Beach City 
Council - Page 7 



\ 



c^ 



2 Virginia Beach Sua, March 9, 1983 



Sun Commentary 



n 



Editorials 



It's High Time 



The thinking was, the greatest number 
of assaults on Virginia Beach police of- 
ficers occur^l during the summer months, 
when the resort area population swdls 
inunensely. Statistics, however, belie this 
notion. 

The fact of the matter is, Virgima 
Beach police officers are assaulted 
regularly all year 'round. Since 1975 there 
have been 836 reported assaults on 
Virginia Beach police officers. (Undn'- 
score the word "reported"). About one- 
third of them occur during the hot sum- 
mer months of June, July and August. 
The other two-thirds of the attacks ap- 
parently fall between September and 
May, and are inflicted, it would seem, 
largely by local residents. 

Respect for law and order, and for law 
enforcement officers has been declining 
for years. Vividly, many people can recall 
the late '60's and the often bloody battles 
between police officers and non- 
conforming college students and other 
special interest groups. The police officers 
were labeled then as the bad guy; and the 
concept of "justice for all" had no place 
in a society of young people who wished 
to "do their own thing." But to be ac- 
curate, the problem is not just a memcNy, 
it is also contempory . 

The unrest of the late 1960's has 
quieted. For the most part, society has 
realized that there is much more to be 
gained by intelligent evaluations of 
situations, and thoughtful reactions, than 
by violence. Yet, there continues to be 
certain sectors of society which continues 
to strike out at authority and refuse to 
respect law and order. 

After gallons, nay swimming p^^ W 
blood having bcim spilled lAd ieSutf chii# 



bruised, Virginia lawmakers have r^dized 
that if police officers fear for their own 
safety, they can't be expected to do thdr 
job of prot^^ting others to the best of 
their ability. Cons«)uently, when Gover- 
nor Robb signs into law House Bill 220, 
and there is 30 fcas^ to thinjc he 
shouldn't, th^\i^opl^ convict^ of 
maliciously or f<^oniousiyViniQrlng a 
police officer, will go to prison. 

In their zeal to protect the rights of law- 
abiding citizens, many Virginia Beach 
police officers have been injured. One, 
Daniel Maloney, even died in the line of 
duty. Thank goodness the General 
Assembly finally addressed this very 
distressing situation. However, legislation 
will not protect police officers from those 
who have been raised with no resp^t for 
the law. Nor will the new legislation 
provide any guarantee that fewer police 
officers will be attacked or killed in the 
future. One thing do^ seem for sure: 
House Bill 220 should strongly deter 
repeat offenders. Certainly those offen- 
ders who spend a year or two in jail for 
assualting a poUce officer will think twice 
about doing it again after they get out. 

As one resort strip police officer told 
The Sun back during the summer of 1981. 
the year in which the assaults on cops in 
the city were at all time high since at least 
1975, "being assaulted is not part of my 
job description." 

No. Being assaulted is not part of his 
job description. But unfortunately, it is 
sometimes part of a police officer's job. 
Therefore, when not enough people in the 
streets help law enforcement officers do 
their job, and in fact sometimes hamper 
them, it's high time k^islatqrs in Richf 
mond stepped in.— <Ir.D.G. 



Tough Issue 



Whittled to its essence, the "Natural 
Death Bill" recently approved by the 
Virginia General Assembly comes down 
to the fundamental choice between life 
and death. 

House Bill 329, which now needs only 
the nod from Gov. Charles S. Robb to 
become law later this year, allows, among 
other things, for terminally ill patients to 
refuse artificial life support systems. If 
said patient is unable to speak for himself, 
his next of kin is given the option to make 
the determination. Under the new law, 
physicians will not be civilly or criminally 
liable for any ensuing deaths. 

Opponents of the bill point to the Bible 
or to their own convictions regarding the 
preservation of aU life. Man, they say, is 
obligated to do everything within his 
power to pr^erve life, no matter the cost. 

Their commitment to their beliefs is 
^mirable. No doubt many paeons in this 
community share these sentiments. 

However, there (X>mes a time when a 
line must be drawn, when there really is, 
quite literally, no hope for survival. Con- 
sider, for example, a Virginia Beach 



resident who has been in a terrible ac- 
cident, and no longer has control over his 
physical or mental facilities. With a brain 
no longer functioning, the only thing 
k^ping his lungs and heart pumping are 
machines. He will never come out of it, 
the doctors say. He will remain, for the 
rest of his life, a vegatable. 

In this sort of case, the person's family 
should have the option of pulling the life- 
sustaining plug, thus allowing their loved 
one to die a peaceful death. Overriding 
the astronomical medical price tag of 
prolonging the life is the cost placed on 
emotions. Imagine the suffering and the 
agony the family must go through while 
their once-Uvely loved one now lies in a 
hospital room, motionless, thoughtless, 
and without feelings. 

The General Assembly has taken a bold, 
but not unprec^ented step in passing 
this law. No doubt many constituents may 
be outraged by the decision. StiU, House 
Bill 329 may become law. Virginia's 
delegates and senators should be r^pec- 
ted for tackling this tough 
issue.— M.M.G. 



Eye On Drunks 



The efforts of the members of the 
Virginia Beach Police Department, under 
the guidance of Chief Charles R. WaU, to 
curb the incidence of drunk driving in the 
community have been ambitious, 
promising and, by all indications, very 
successful thus far. 

The department has succeeded in not 
only doubling its arrests of drunken 
drivers over the last y«r, but it has wit- 
nessed a reduction of alcohol-relatwl traf- 
fic fatalities, from 32 in 1981, to 23 last 
year. 



The chief and his organization have 
given their utmost to perpetuate the theme 
that Virginia Beach is tough on drunks. 
Hie results of the last 12 months' efforts 
are voy encouraging, suggesting that 
Wall may be hitting the nail on the head. 

At a ttctni press conference, Wall 
unloished a host of statistics on his DUI 
enforcement campaign. Did you know: 

•That since 1974, DUI arrests in the 
resort city have exploded, from 439 to 
1,830? 

S«cEditOTMl,Pa|ell 



Letters To The Editor 



"Gun Lover" Attacks The Virginian-Pilot Council Coverage 



Editor.^ 

I would like to ressxnd to the editorial "Shoat-<^t at 
The Beach" in the Manh 3. 1993, Virginian PUot. U 
•eems that The Vir^nian-PUot has sunk to a new low in 
bs neva--«idiiif htttie apinst guns and (pin oiraers 
and also i^fonddes a priflM example <rf slantiny Uie 
news. 

As one (rfthe "gun lovers" who attended the recent 
Virginia Beach Qty Council aweting, I fiukd to hear 
the "ranting" Uuu was mentioned in The Virginian- 
Afof article. What I did bear were peq;de ittteg our 
deraooatic system to try and change a law whid^ they 
to not agree with. We already have a Federal law which 
VKkAie» dnig ackicts, oonvkted feloas, and ex-mental 



Liked Editorial ^ 

Editor: 

1 enjoy reading all the editorials in the "Sun", but I 
especially lited the one written by Mr. Gddfarb titled 
"Handy Belt" on Feb. 16. 1983. 

1 showed this article to a law enforcement offi^r and 
he was happy to see it printed in The Sun, as the 
previous week he expressed ahnost the same exact 
(pinion to me. 

Also the story on Feb. 23 by reporter Mike CoofUng, 
"Scared Out of My Wits", was outstanding. Keep up 
the great reporting and excellent editorials. 

R.J. Brightbill, 
>^rginia Beach 



The Businessman' Draws Fire 

Editor: 

Having read your article. "What Does It Take To Be 
A Winner," I feel I should write this letter to express 
my vievra of "The Biuinessman." Having dealt with 
the Cavalier for six previous years on the last weekend 
(rf February, our Conference had access to just about 
the whole hotel. This year was different. We had 
scheduled our weekend and worked hard at preparing 
for approximately 7S0 to 800 people who attended. We 
were not notified or given my reason why they 
scheduled another con^ntion the sune weekend. 

Our people were sent to the (Xd Cavalier, which was 
not bad, but others of our group were taktn to the 
jRamada Inn. S7th Street, to make room for the other 
group. Of course, ^ peopK oi the Oceanfiropt 
Conference were very put out. If you could have heiyd 
the promises "The Businessman" gave to us, at the 
1982 Conferentx, you would have thought it tq be true. 

We will not return to the Qivalier in 1984 and have 
not made a decision whether to stay at the beach. Our 
group of people have a Mrtain amount of revenue at the 
beach each year. I have always heard that "word of 
mouth" was the best Mlvertisement you could get but 
the comments I heard were not favorable at all. 

Russell Talley 
Virginia Beach 



patiems from buying or possessrag guns ahd I do not 
think that we need a local Uw which says basicaUy the 
same thing. What the Virginia Beach ordinance does 
contain and 7% F»iW»«to' conveniently left out of 
their artk^ is the bet that the cunrent sutute of which 
the iristd permit is a part, mak«s it illegal to purchase, 
Ttratufer, give as a gift or fct another person use a pistd 
for any reason m Vi^ima Beach without a permit. This 
means that a husbami iHjoktt his wife use his pistol at 
the rnige, or a fether wIk> gives his son a pistol for his 
birthday is technicaUy guihy of a Class 1 Misdemeanor 
which is punishaUe by up to 12 months in jail and a 
$1,000 fiiw. lUs is simply another exunple of a law 
«iikh punishes the law abkling citizens while having no 
effect on the crimiiial. 

As I stated at the Qty Couadl meeting and which 
The Virginia-PUot chose not to publish in any of its 
other i^des on this issue, the answer to our problem is 
not more laws but in keeiMng the criminals in jail once 
we have them. A prime example of this was the recent 
murder M a Virginia Beach tire store where the alleged 
Idller was out on a low bond for approximately thirty 
fekmws because one proseoitor did not believe he 
"was a threat to the community." 

In 1776 we needed guns to protect ourselves from 
Indians and Kedcoats. b 1983 we need them to protect 
oundvef am} (Nir famiSes from robbers, rapists, 
mug^rs, mnrdo-ers and other derdicU who prey on 
society since the pdice tfe i^etdMd too thin to be 
everywhov at once. 

It never ceases to amaze me that The Vlrgmian-fHlot 
is so willing to attack our rights under the Second 
Amendment of the Constitution. I wonder if that 
nameless writer of the editorial would feel the same 
way about the First Amendment, that which guarantees 

freedom oS the press? 

William LSchdl. 
"^ ' Virginia Beach 



A Real Honor 

Editw: 

Thank you very much for having such a good rep<xter 
in Mike Gooding, who, incittentaUy, does everything f^ 
well-photography, writing ami editing. I ccmsider it a 
real honor to have been interviewed by him. 

Thank you, 
Cassandra Douglas Arnold "Go Go" Barnes 

Virginia Beach 



Arson Is Stupid 



Editor: 

This arson situation is really getting ridiculous. 
Millions of dollars are being foolishly wasted, and lives, 
needlessly risked. 

Who would do so foolish a thing? Is it greedy hotel 
owners trying to turn a pn^? Is it a crazy person, a 
pyroroaniac? Or is it a bundi of dumb kids locddng for 
kicks? 

Mrs. Ethel White 
Virginia Beach 



Editorial 



Council Notes 



There u-e about 90 acres in Virgiiiia 
Beach in which drainage ditches are a 
problem. Residents living near the ditches 
would like them corrected. However, city 
officials report that to repipe only 49 of 
them would cost $37,073,000. That 
roughly averages out to better than $1 
million a ditch, and that is ahnost un- 
believable. 

The Kings Point ditch, for example, 
where residents have b^n complaining, 
require an 84-inch pipe for 2,900 linear 
feet at a cost of at least $521,000 and 
possibly as much as $750,000, or three- 
quarters of a million dollars. 

This, and much more information on 
the matter was recently presented to City 
Council by Public Works Director Oral 
Lambert. Council took no action. 



A local billboard company has 
requested permission to er^t three new 
billboards on Holland Road and two on 
Rosemont Road, but did |iot win the ap- 
proval of City Council. Instead, Council 
requested a review of the city's billboard 
policy by the Virguiia Beach Planning 
Commission, which had already approved 
the request. 

Some local r^idents contend that more 
osmmercial billboards in the city won't do 
anything to make Virginia Beach more at- 
tractive. And in fact, as the billboards 
weather and wear, they will possibly be an 
eyesore. 

If billboards are neat and modem, not 
too big and tastefully placed, more of 

SeeEDrr0iUAL.Pi«e7 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

'Hu Virginu Beach Sun welcomes ami enonira^s ktten to the editor on any and all Virginia Beach 
issues, as wdl as any other issues, questi<ms or cimcems affecting the wdl bang of the Virginia Beach 
community. Letters should be typed, doubfe spa^d aiui include the writers name, Mldress and telephone 
number. Mail lettCTs to The Virginia Beach Sun% 138 S. Roaonont Road. Virginia Bea^ Va. 23432. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



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Virsinia Beach Happeninss This Week 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 9. 1983 3 

Send your happenings lo The VirKinia 
Beach Sua, 138 S. Rosemonl Road, 
VirgiMia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Wednesday 



AgHiMOffHwYMrl 

The Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture 
will hold its "Men of the Year in Agriculture" 
banquet on Wednesday, March 9 beginning at 
7:30 p.m. 

It will be held atl^he Cavalier Yacht and Coun- 
try Club, 1052 Cardinal Road. 

The keynote speaker will be Governor Charles 
Robb. Master of (xremonies will be Virginia 
Beach Agriculture Department Chairman Dick 
Cockrell; invocation, Rev. D. S. Moyers; presen- 
tation of awards. Bob Fentress, president, 
Virginia Beach Chamber of Commerce; introduc- 
tion of mayor, Thomas H. Muehlenbeck, city 
manager, Virginia Beach; mayor's proclamiEition, 
Louis R. Jones, Mayor, Virginia Beach; introduc- 
tion of governor; R. H. DeFord, Jr., chairman, 
Agriculture Committee, Virginia Beach Chamber 
of Commerce; and a tribute to agriculture by 
Governor Robb. 

A fee is charged. Call 427-4856. 



Thursday 

"Getting Your Money's Worth," a free finan- 
cial program for women, presented by Dominion 
National Bank Branch Manager Mary Walker, 
will be held at 12:30 p.m. in Building B-lOO on 
Thursday, March 10, at the Virginia Beach Cam- 
pus of Tidewater Community College. 

For more information, contact TCC's Student 
Activities Office at the Virginia Beach Campus. 



At 

The Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture/ 
Cooperative Extension Service is offering four 
days of classes covering a variety of horticulture 
topics. Class dates are March 10, 17, 24, and 31 
and will, be held at the Virginia Beach Pavilion. 
Class times are 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. 

These programs will cover such subjects as 
organic and inorganic gardening, landscaping, 
solar greenhouses, flowering trees and shrubs and 
many others. Guest speakers include Jim Kincaid 
of WVEC Channel 13 and Grace Sumner, food 
writer, Virginian Pilot /Ledger-Star. There is a one 
dollar per day fee which cap be used £pr one or all 
the day time programs. Tickttt'fffH bf.amliAikJit 
the door. For the time schedule or for more in- 
formation, call 427-4769. 



The Virginia Beach Clean Community Com- 
mission will meet on Thursday, March 10 at 11 
a.m. in room 236, City Hall Building, Virginia 
Beach Municipal Center. 



Cap« Henry Wi 

The Cape Henry Woman's ,,aub of Virginia 
Beach will hold its monthly luncheon meeting on 
Thursday, March 10 at 1 1 a.m. at Tandom's Pine 
Tree Inn on Virginia Beach Boulevard. A program 
on Public Affairs wiU be presented. Mrs. Harold 
Curtis is Chairman. 

The hostesses for the meeting will be Mrs. 
Charles Molloy and Mrs. Boyce Webb. Table 
decorations will be provided by Mrs. George 
Mullahy and Mrs. Daniel Williard. 

Reservations should be made by Tuesday, Mar- 
ch 8 with Mrs. George Dozier, 340-3192. 

Call 340-5633 for more information. 

■•fa Stgna PM MmM 

The Tidewater City Council of Beta Sigma Phi 
Sorority will hold its regular meeting on Thur- 
sday, March 10, at 7:30 p.m. at St. Peters 
Episcopal Church located at 224 Military High- 
way. For additional information call 587-0066 af- 
ter 5 p.m. 

Beach V«t At Mors* CommII 

Dr. David M. Gregg, D.V.M. will speak on the 
"Different Problems Of The Hone" at a Tide- 
water Horse Council dinner meeting to be held on 
Thursday, March 10. 

Dinner will start at 7 p.m. at the Golden Corral 
on Battlefield Boulevard in Great Bridge. The 
meeting will follow at 8 p.m. 

Dr. Gregg is a Virginia Beach veterinarian 
whose Tidewater practice is limited to equine 
medicine and surgery. 

All area horse enthusiasts are urged to atteml. A 
question and answer session will follow the 
presentation. 

Call Mrs. Marilyn Rcbby at 467-7744 for reser- 
vations. 



Friday 



A bingo night will be Md on Friday, March 1 1 
from 8 to 9 p.m. at the Kempsville Recreation 
Center. Call 495-1892 for more information. 



Arbor Day 

The City of Virginia Botth will Ik*I Arbor E^y 
Ceremonies on Friday, March 11. The c«Tm<»io 
will be heU at 2 p.m. U the Virginia Beach 
Municipal Center (noct to tte Civfl War C«n- 



memorative Statue near the old Courthouse area). 

As part of the ceremony, Virgnia Beach will be 
receiving iu third Tree City USA National Award. 
Mayor Louis R. Jones will accept the award from 
the National Arbor Day Foundation presented by 
Mr. Richard Woodling, District Forester, Virginia 
Division of Forestry. Mayor Jones and City 
Manager Thomas H. Muehlenbeck will also plant 
a tree during the ceremonies. 

In further celebration of Arbor Day, on Friday, 
March 1 1, from 10 am. to 9 p.m. a display will be 
set up at Pembroke Mall, where free pin^e seedlings 
will be given to the public. This display will be 
staffed with representatives from the City of 
Virginia Beach, Landscape Services Division, the 
VPI Extension Service, Master Gardeners and the 
Virginia Beach Eautification Commission. In ad- 
dition to distributin pine seedlings, they will also 
be available to answer questions on landscaping. 




Boxing At Rogue's 

Virgiiiia Beach's "Smoking" Ricky Bulls, irainini above 
with hi* dog, Smoking, will be fealured in a pro boxing card al 
Rogac's Thursday nighl. Bulls (1-0) will fighl Charles Carter 
of CharioUcsville (2-2) in a middleweight boul. Ric "The 
Virginia Beach Bomber" Lainharl will match dukes with John 
. Greene, of Richmond in a heavyweight fighl. Lainharl is M, 
Greene, 3-3. Another Beach boxer, Pete "Rocky" Harris (2-4) 
wUI meet Carl Phillips (l^O) of Mechanicsviile. Filling oat the 
card will be Billy WyatI of Mechanicsvilie in his pro debut 
agaiMl Will Rankin of Chariotlesville (1-3) In a welterweight 
match. 

The schedule also calls for professional kick boxing. Curtb 
Bub, a Beach resident, is slated lo appear in one of the three 
kick boxing matches. 

TickeU, S7 advance, $8 the night of the show, arc available 
at The Surf Rider Restaurant, Mary's Country Kitcbea, and at 
Rogue's. 



Cola Batkofball Classic tot 

The 5th Annual James K. Cole Basketball 
Marathon Classic will be held at the Virginia 
Beach Recreation Center/Kempsville, March 11, 
12, 13, 1983. Play, truly marathon in nature, will 
begin at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 1 1 and goes con- 
tinuously through the final game late Sunday af- 
ternoon, without a let up. There is no spectator 
charge. 

Interested teams should contact Bill Boyce at 
467-4884 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. for 
registration instructions. 

Saturday 

Caocor Rock-A-Thoa Sot 

The Fourth Annual Rock-A-Thon of the 
Virginia Beach Unit of the American Cancer 
Society is scheduled for Saturday, march 12, in 
Pembroke Mall with Mrs. C. H. Wisecarver as 
chairman. 

The community is invited to participate in the 
event, volunteering time and pledges to assure that 
the goal of $5,000 is met. Several civic and 
business establishments have already indicated 
that they will sponsor a chair with a team of their 
personnel volunteering to spell each other rocking. 

Prizes have been donated by local merchants to 
be awarded to the participants acquiring the most 
pledges. Refreshments will be served to all par- 
ticipants. 

For additional information on how you, as an 
individual, or your organization may be a part of 
the Rock-A-Thon for the American Cancer 
Society call the Virginia Beach Unit Office, 481- 
7119. 



A puppet show, "Jack and the Beanstalk," will 
be held on Saturday, March 12 at 11 a.m. at the 
i^npsviUe Recrmtion Center. 



Tlie cwitemporary musical group "Isaac" will 
be in contort on ^turday, March 12 at 6:30 p.m. 
at the Pavilion. 



Lynnhaven Parish Chapter, National Society 
Daughters of the American Revolution will meet 
on Saturday, March 12, at 10 a.m. at the home of 
Mrs. Daniel Norton 1301 Eagle Avenue. Mrs. 
Charles Pyatt and Miss Julie Anna Pyatt will be 
cohostesses. 

Chapter officers for the 1983-1986 term will be 
elected at this meeting. 

The program will be slides entitled, "A Legacy 
Preserved", which depict the DAR National 
Headquarters; Constitution Hall and Memorial 
Continental Hall. 

Mrs. Joseph L. Brand, regent and Mrs. Eugene 
T. Connors will be the chapter delegates to the 
Virginia DAR State Conference to be held at the 
John Marshall Hotel in Richmond March 15-17. 

Vac aH oa Ih o wcai o At Pavilloa 

The 1983 Vacation and Travel Showcase will be 
held on Saturday, March 12 from 11 a.m. to 8 
p.m. at the Pavilion. The show is sponsored by C. 
I. Travel Center/Cruise International. 

Ip a Jo s Toa m a i ot latod 

A spades tournament will be held on Saturday, 
March 12 at 6:30 p.m. at the Kempsville 
Recreation Center. 

Stars At Lyiialiavoo Mall 

Stars from the daytime drama series "All My 
Children" and "Guiding Light" will appear at 
Lynnhaven Mall on Saturday, March 12. 

Laurence Lau (Greg Nelson on "All My 
Children") and Michael Tylo (Quinton McCord 
on "Guiding Light") will appear in the mall's cen- 
ter court at 1 p.m. for a question-and-answer 
period, autographs and photographs; at 3 p.m. in 
a mall-sponsored fashion show entitled "That's 
Our Style!" and another autograph session at 4 
p.m. 

The "That's Our Style!" fashion shows will 
feature Lynnhaven Mall's fashion and accessories 
stores and will feature the appearance of Miss 
California in the 3 p.m. show, as well as the 
television stars. A repeat performance of the show 
is scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday. 



Sunday 

Pony Rides, 4-H Sea Horse Riders, will be held 
at the Virginia Beach Farmer's Market on Sunday, 
March 13 from noon to 4 p.m. 

UrcNf ol Showcaso At#avllioa 

The 1983 VacatioA aiid Travel Showcase i/ttl be 
at the Pavilion on Sunday, March 13 from 11:30 
a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Monda y 

CltyCoaacllMooto 

Virginia Beach City Council meets on Monday, 
March 14 in the City Hall Building, Municipal 
Center. Informal session begins at 12:30 p.m. The 
formal session begins at 2 p.m. 



Virginia Beach Friends of Music presents An- 
dre-Michael Schub on Monday, March 14 at 8:30 
p.m. at the Pavilion. 

■osiaoss WooMa Host Crooch 

Virginia Beach Councilwoman Nancy Creech 
will be the guest speaker at the Polly Miller Chap- 
ter of the American Business Woman's 
Association meeting on Monday, March 14 at 6:30 
p.m. 

The monthly fteeting will be held at Jerry's 
Resuurant, on Military Highway. 



Tuesday 

Air Porco Caroors At Baysldo 

Major Gordon Borch, USAF, will describe 
career opportunities in the Unitwl States Air Force 
in a lecture and film presentation on Tuesday, 
March 15, at 7 p.m. in the Bayside Area Library in 
Virginia Beach. 

For more information about the Air Force 
careers lecture, call the library at 464-9280. 



jU Boslaoss, Tax Soorfoars 

The Marketing and Distributive Education sec- 
tion of the Virginia Beach Piiblic Schools has an- 
nounced two special activities. 

A 15-hour clinic on tax aspects of small business 
wiU be presented on March 15, and 29 and on 
April 5. 12, and 19 from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Career 
Development Center, 273 N. Witchduck Road, 
room 106. The instructor will be Jack Ferguson, 
U.S. International Revenue Agent, Norfolk of- 
fice. Call 427^56 to register. 

An 18-hour course on federal income taxation 
II course will be conductwl on March 10, 17 and 
24 and on April 7, 14, and 21 from 7 to 10 p.m. at 
the Career Development Center. The instructor 
will be Jack Ferguson. Call 427^56 to register. 



SchOoI Board AAoots 

The Virginia Beach School Board meet!> on 
Tuesday, March 15 at 2 p.m. in room 131, School 
Administration Building, Municipal Center, 




oming 



Sons Off Italy Bvffffot, Ball 

The Sons of Italy of Roma Lodge #254 will 
spaisor a St. Patrick's Charity Ball on Saturday. 
March 19 at the Lodge Hall. Donation is $10 per 
person. Menu consists of corned beef and 
cabbage, boiled potatoes, cornbrcad, baked ziti. 
salad and dessert. Deadline for ticket purchasing 
is March 15, 1983. Dinner begins at 7:30 p.m. and 
dancing starts at 9 p.m. to I a.m. Music by Azure. 

Friday Night Buffets are in full swing at the 
Lodge Hall on Friday evenings. Menus consist of 
such items as: stuffed shells, flounder filet, fried 
chicken, roast pork loin vegetables, dessert and 
salad. Donation is $5 per member, $6.06 per 
non-member and children between the ages of 6 - 
12, half'price. 

Soni of Italy of Roma Lodge #254 will have their 
next regular monthly meeting on March 28 in the 
Lodge Hall. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. 
and members are encouraged to attend. 

So y oi o i uA ot S tra t ogy Loctvro 

Susan Mayo, Consumer Affairs Director for a 
local supermarket chain, will explore various con- 
sumer ajternatives for saving money at the super- 
market in a lecture on Wednesday, March 16, at 
7:15 p.m. in the Great Neck Area Library. 

Registration in advance for her lecture is 
required. Interested adults may register by calling 
the library at 481-6094. 



Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders 
(ANAD) will hold a group meeting for anorectics, 
parents and families at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, 
March 16, at the Naval Air Norfolk Federal Credit 
Union Building, Suite 500, Room 2, 160 Newtown 
Road, Virginia Beach. 

The meeting is free. Those interested are invited 
to attend. For additional information call Dr. 
Pamela Zane at 587-8788 or Diana Crawford at 
857-1689. 

Anorexia Nervosa and its associated disorder 
bulimia are dangerous eating disorders charac- 
terized by extreme weight loss and/or binge eating 
and purging. 




AttOHtlont SoNill Pannors 

The Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture - 
Cooperative Extension Service is in the process of 
updating its mailing list for small farmers. Anyone 
wishing to receive educational information 
relative to small farms in the City of Virginia 
Beach that is not currently listed on the mailing list 
should contact the Virginia Beach Department of 
Agriculture at the Municipal Center by March 1 1 
and give their name and address so that they can 
be included on the list. Phone 427-4769. 

CoxBaadSolbPrvIt 

The Frank W. Cox High School Ban is selling 
fresh citrus fruit. 

Grapefruit, Navel and Valencia oranges, boxed 
in two sizes, are available for delivery at the end of 
March. To order contact a band member or call 
Mrs. Chris Hernandez 481-7581 or Mrs. Glenda 
Gibbs 481-5149. 

Proceeds from this sale will enable the band to 
compete at Kings Dominion this May. 



TTie Virginia Beach Wetlands Board will meet 
<m Ti«sday, March 15 at 9:30 a.m. in City Coun- 
cil Chambers, City Hall Building, Municipal Cen- 
tm. 



Deadline for entries to the "Little Miss Nep- 
tune" contest is April 1. 

It is for Virginia Beach girls age four through 
seven. To enter, send a picture and $10 entry fee to 
5952 Clear Spring Court, Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23464. Call 420-8331 for more information. All 
proceeds from this contest go to St. Jude 
Children's Hospital. 

A Bay Off Loodscapo Idoas 

The Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture/ 
Cooperative Extension Service is offering three 
horticulture classes on Thursday, March 10 at iJie 
Virginia Beach Pavilion. 

Class topics and speakers are: Turf Maintenan- 
ce by Randal Jackson, Extension Agent; Land- 
scapes for Tidewater by Linda Pinkham, Smith- 
field Gardens; and Year Round Flowers and 
Fragrances by Jay Mears, McDonald Garden Cen- 
ter. 

Class times are 10 a.m., I p.m., and 3 p.m. 
respectively. There is one dollar per day fee which 
can be used for one or all of the programs. Tickets 
are available at the door. For more information, 
caU 427-4769. 

Booia l-Oiioo tlooist iHffrrrt 

The Roma Lodge #254 O.S.I.A., has elected the 
following members as officers for 1983: 

President, John Wins; vice-president, Louis 
Soscia; orator, James Broccoletti; recording 
secretary. Carmen Andes; financial secretary, 
Remo Castellano; treasurer, John Di Dio; guard, 
Luigi Di Sisto; mistress of ceremony. Norma 
Russo, and Josephine lannatti; trust»s, Salvatore 
Siano; Sylv«ter Luciano; Robert Del Donna; 
V^nt Barone; and Ronald Del Duca. 

Interated persons who would like to join the 
Roma Lodge should contact the Lodge Hall, after 
6 p.m. daily, by calling 468-^29. 






iMMiaai 



ooai 



Matt 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 



n 



Yirsinia Beach Sun Hews 



Virginia Beach Officials Speak Out On New 'Natural Death Act' 



Continued from Page I 

said Philip Abraham, the governor's special assistant 
for pdicy. 

"/ believe that life is sacred, but life is 
also your own. If I could trust the doc- 
tor when he told me there is no realistic 
hope for survival, Vd ask him to pull 
the phig, ''—Louise Sarian, a Virginia 
Beach nursing home resident who lost 
two husbands to cancer, 

Dei. Beraani Cokcn, (D), Alcxaadria, the bill's 
sponsor, said the new law will provide tertninally ill 
patients, "the respect and dignity they desire." Said 
G)hen, who has been trying to win approval of the bill 
for three years: "All this law does is allow people in 
terminal conditions to make known their desires that 
they don't want extraordinary and heroic means of 
sustaining their lives." 
Del. J. Samad Glancock (D), Saffoik-ChciapMkc, a 

member of the Assembly Committee to Stt^ the 
Rights of the Terminally 01, said the bill is "u 
excellent statement of what the law ought to be." 

Gasscock explained that the tnll is brdcen down to 
provide maximum protection for both doctors and 
patients. According to Glasscock, the bill: 

•Gives physicians inununity from civil and criminal 
prosecution if they are carrying aax patients' wishes. 

•Requires written declaration witnessed by two 
paeons, which states the patient does not want to sue 
life-sustaining devices; or, 

•Allows for the use c^ oral <teclaratJons in very 
limited circumstances; or, 

•Sets up a pecking order oi persons who can make 
the decision about life support systems if the patient is 
unable to do sa They are: a guardian, parents, 
someone designated in writing by the patient, the 
spouse, a majority <tf children, or the patient's nearest 
living relative. 

•Obligates physicians opposed to removing life 
support to help transfer the patients to other 
physicians. 

•Strictly f(»-bades euthanasia, or any sort of active 
effort to end a patient's life such as the injection of a 
lethal drug. 

•Assures that a patient's insurance policy will be 
honored. 

"I should hope that the minority of the pe(q>le in this 
area and around the state wanted this law," ^aid 
Qasscock. "Most (^the people Fve talked to want to be 
able to make this decision. We have given them 
(reedom of choice." 

VIrgtaia Beach Reacdoi 

Three out of Virginia Beach's five General AssemUy 
delegates supported the measure. Qie supporter. Del. 
Owea C. Pickett, Jr. (D), called the biU "very 
humanitarian. 



KB 



"'Elderly persons for yean have ex- 
pressed concerns to me that they don't 
want to be prolonged in a comatose 
situation. This law has incorporated the 
safeguards to be a productive and effec- 
tive law, "—Delegate Owen Pickett 

"I've heca aware of a need for this type of l^isUtion 
for a very long time." said Pickett. "Other bills oi this 
sort have been introduced a number of tiroes during my 
10 years in Richmond, and Pve always supported them. 
"EWeriy persons for years have expressed concems 
to me that they don't want to be |»olaaged in a 
comatose situation," Kckett continued. "This Mil has 
incorporated the safeguards it needs to be a productive 
and effective law. Nothing is perfect, but this provides 
a workabfe framwork." 

Dd. Ji^ L. Saritt, (D), voted against tlK meuure 
because, she said, "Tlwre was just eiXNigh doubt m 
JuIm Smith's mind." Said Smith:..."! agreed with the 
concept of the bill, but the {»^oblem I had was with 
giving doaors complete inununity. That was going ^t 
a bit too far. 

* 7 agreed with the concept of the bill, 
but the problem I had was with giving 
the doctors complete immunity. That 
was going a bit too far," — Delegate 
Juiie Smith 

"1 think the cotKcpt is good," Smith continued. 
"There are tin^s when there is absolutely no hope far 
some people. If they've signed tte dedanuko they've 
obviously thought their decision through. 

"But, 1 couldn't see why we hMi to pass this law this 
^ar." saki Smith. "1 didn't receive a wfaok kx of 
oorrespoiKlence from my constituents, but that which I 




Sarian 



did receive was all opposed to the bill. The bill just 
squeaked out of the Senate, and besides, only 13 other 
states have passed bills like this. I'm not comfortable 
with that." 

Dd. W.R. "Bm^" O'BrieR. (R), opposed the bill 
because oi what he caUed "philosphical differences 
with the idea of it. 



**I believe there is always some basis 
for hope that a patient might recover,,,! 
fully understand a lot of what the bilVs 
supporters were saying. They aren't 
wrong, I just can't ^support 
them,"— Delegate W,R. ""Buster" 
O'Brien 



"I've got a great deal of regard for the value of 
human life," he said. "I believe there is always some 
basis for hope that a patient might recover, htow, 1 
didn't get up and fight the bill, and, in fact, I fully 
understand a lot of what the bill's supporters were 
saying. They aren't wrong. I just can't support them." 

Religious groups such as the Catholic Diocese of 
Richmond, which oversees the Roman Catholic faith in 
Tidewater, lobbied against the bill. The Rev. JaoKS 
Ofetbeii, a member of Vlrghifai Beach's Rock Charch, 
expluned why. 

"God wills if there is to be life, and He has the 



authority over when death is to come," said Ostberg. 
"Who is man to presume upon God? I've read through 
the Bible many times, and I've never seen anythii^ 
that says that people should be able to decide when 
they can and cannot die." 

*"God wills if there is to be life, and 
He has the authority when death is to 
come. Who is man to presume upon 
God?*"— The Reverend James Ostberg, 
Virginia Beach Cleric 

Ostberg says the General Assembly "overstepped its 
boundaries." Said Ostberg: "We hear all the time that 
there ought to be a separation (rf churdi and state, but 
in this case, it might have behoovec) the General 
Assembly to contact the Christian cooununity before 
bringing this matter to a vote. There should be a lot 
more dialogue between the religious oxnmunity and 
the political community." 

"For me. I wouldn't want to be in the position of 

making this sort of decision," Ostberg continued. 
"Where does life begin and where does it end? Man 
has no way of knowing. This law has a tendency of 
making physicians act as God. My contention is that 
there is always a ray of hgp^ somewhere, and doctors 
have a moral obligation tb preserve life at all costs." 
Dr. George C SJoulaod, director of Vlrgiaia Beach's 
health department, called the bill "a positive step 
which gives people an c^tioi, and is a benefit to 
patients and to their families." 



""This law is useful to prevent 
prolonged agony. To my mind, it is 
basically an advantage to have this on 
the books because,,. this gives them an 
opportunity to avoid going through life 
as a vegetable,"— Virginia Beach 

Health Department Director, Dr, 
George C. Sjolund 

Sjdund said life support systems for such maladies 
as cardiac and heart failure are "Very expensive," and 
"some pet^le survive, some people don't. 

"This law is useful to prevent prolonged agony," 
Sjolund continued. "To my mind, it is basically an 



advantage to have this on the books because when 
paUents are able to make a sound decision, this gives 
them the opportunity to avoid going through hfe as a 
vegauble." Sjolund added that most terminally tU 
paUents wiU not elect to exercise the option of turning 
oSS life-sujqxjrt mechanisms. 

DitM SadowaU, dircctar of sodal iduMMiatkia far 

Beverly Emerprtses, eastern division, lorent corpora- 
tion of 105 nursing homes in the southeast, said he has 
"mixed feelings" about the biU. "In my Une of work, 
we strive to keep people alive as long as possibfe," he 
said. "In the long run though, I favor the legislation 
because we have to do what the person wants. Eadi 
pei^on has to have the right to make his own dedsioo." 

WmteB B. Kcaacr, adnriatotntor of Un Shores 

Maaor, a subsidary <rf Beveriy Enteritises, apj^uded 
the bill. "If I had to be on life support systems, Pve 
akeady tdd my dodcots and my family that I don't want 
it," he said. "But, if it was niy daugldcr, I'd probal^ never 
give up as long as there was the slightest bit of hope." 
Keaner said most (^the 242 residents at Lynn Shores 
would probably fevor the biU. "The legistotors have 
responded to the wishes of the majority of the state," 
he added. "It was a daring step, but one that was 
iMcded." 



Heischober 
Considering 
Nomination 

Reports are that 
Virginia Beach At-large 
Councilman Harold 
Heischober will soon an- 
noimce his candidacy for 
the Republican State 
Senate nomination, 7th 
Senatorial District. At- 
large Councilwoman 
Meyera Oberndorf has 
also announced she will 
seek the nomination. 




Heischober 



Dome Serves 
As Link 

The Dome will serve as 
Virginia Beach's link with 
other tourist areas in 
Tidewater as part of a 
"Discover Tidewater" 
program promoted by 
Tidewater Regional Tran- 
sit (TRT). 

Bus service during the 
summer months would 
coniMct the be»:h to other 
points of interest such as 
Norfolk's Waterside and 
Portsmouth's Seawall. 

An ad hoc task force 
recommended using the 
Dome as a stop-off point. 
Qty Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck also has 
asked the TRT to assign a 
person to man the infor- 
mation booth at the Douk 
in connection with the 
program. 

The Task Vacfx in- 
cludes Michael J. Barrett, 
A.J. DeBellis, C. Oral 
Lambert Jr., Robert J. 
Scott and Harold S. 
Whitehurst all dty admin- 
istrators. 



itHk Steak House 

opens its doors in 

Pembroke Mall. 



Discover a famfly steak restaurant 
with more to offen More variety (just 
look at this sanqjling from our menu). 
More service (courteous people who 
show you to your table, dear away 
^tHir trays aik make sure your a^ee 
IS always hot). And more value. '9k 
even have some spedal menu itans 
just ixx kids priced at just $1.49. 

Yartc is everything you'd expect 
a great family steak house to oe. 
Aj«imore. 

PembnteMall 

Open Sunday 11 am-8 pm 

Monday-Thurwiay 1 1 am-9 pm 

Friday & Saturday 11 am-10 pm WKtKk 

Yorit Steak Hoiuie is also located ^^Q 

in New Market North MaU ^^ 
and Ibwer Mall 



MICHAEL F. 

FASAN ARC, JR. 

Attorney 
At Law 

4il-6121 

5 Koger Executix^ Center 
SUrrE220 

Norff*,Va. 23502 




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N 



\ irginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 



Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 



w 



1 Out Of 5 Assaults Reported 



Continued from Page 1 

Virginia Beacii PoUce Chief diaries R. Wall said the 
figures are much too high. 

*7 know we had 112 assaults last 
year. In a 397-man department thafs 
quite a large percentage. If the public 
was assaulted, percentage-wise, as 
much as police officers were, I think 
there 'd be a big outcry, * ' 
^Virginia Beach Police Chief Charles 
Wall 



"1 know we had 112 assaults {on police officers) last 
year," Wall said. "In a 397-man department that's 
quite a large percentage. If the public was assaulted, 
percentage-wise, as much as pdice officers were, 1 
think there'd be a big outcry." 

If the bill becomes law. Wall said officers will learn 
the details of it while they are being trained, and also 
during rdl calls. 

He said the proposed new law is "not a bad idea," 
but his COTicerns over the issue go deeper. 

"What I'm ccHicerned about is that it's not just the 
person; they're assaulting the system rather than the 
individual. If a person will assault a police officer, they 
wouldn't think twice about assaulting another indivi- 
dual. 

"We represent society," Wall continued. "It's not 
just me, Charles Wall; it's me, Charles Wall the 
pdiceman you've put out there to protect everyone.,. 
and it's important that individuals do spend SOTie time 
in jail if they do mack a pohce officer." 

Virginia Beach Police Captain J.W. Brazier, Jr., 
commanding officer, training and perscmnel, and also 
an attorney, said the proposed law would be effective in 
detcring assaults <m pdice officers "if it's brought to 
the attenti<Mi of the public." He added, "It's bound to 
have an affect," 



** There *s a certain segment of the 
population that will continue to assault 
police officers. There >e certain types 
you can't legislate around.''— Virginia 
Beach Police Captain J. W, Brazier, Jr. 

'" 

But Brazier also notes that law will not stop some 
^Qp\tftem\xy'\n%\o^\iMixA)KX\iy. 



"There's a certain segment of the population that 
will CMJtinue to assault pdicc of^ctn" he said. 
"There're certain types that you can't legislate 
artxind." 

Brazier said that fat every attack on a cop repated, 
there are five that gounrepOTted, including those from 
"little dd ladies, hysterical kids, and drunks." 

There has been a trend, recently, calling for police 
officers to sue their assailants for damages, it seems to 
be effective. 

"They all win," Brazier said, "I haven't heard of any 
of them who haven't." 

Virginia Beach Police Oflker Jim Walters, who 
works The Strip in the SecOTd Precinct, is glad the 
Assembly passed the bill. 

"I think it's excellent that the General Assembly has 
revised the state code in order to protect the police 
officer in the performance of h!s duty," Walters said. 

Lawmakers for years have argued that the rights of a 
police officer should not be elevated over an ordinary 
man. But Walters differs. 



'*The assault of a police officer 
should be dealt with more stringently 
than the assault of one citizen on 
another, because the assault of a police 
officer in the performance of his duty is 
an assault on the law and the 
society. "—Resort Strip Police Officer 
Jim Walters 



"The assault of a pdice officer should be dealt with 
more stringently than the assault of one citizen on 
another," he said. "Because the assault of a police 
officer in the performance of his duty is an assault on 
the law and the society." 

State Senator Joe Canada, Virginia Beach, has tried 
unsuccessfully to introduce similiar legislaticm for 
years. He was attempting to do so again this year, but 
heard of House Bill 220, sponsored by Delegate Frank 
Hall, (D), Richmond, and threw his weight behind it. 

"I think it's a good step in the right direction." 
Canada said. 

Will the bill deter future assaults? 

"I think it will," Canada said. 

Hall said he was approached about introducing the 
bill by the Virginia Association of Police Chiefs. 

House Bill 220 passed the Senate, 36-0, and the 
House, 93-4. It was one of three assault bills introduced 
this year. The Governor has until March 28 to sign il. 



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Student Creative Writing 



These works are from ••tudenis at Maiibu tiementary School. The principal te J. W. Prine. 



Questions At Day 

What makes the children go out and play? 
What makes the wind blow through the trees? 
What makes the rain come down in the day? 
Why does the honey attract the bees? 

What makes the time change? 

Why is the ocean so big and blue? 

What makes the teachers at school so strange? 

How does Elmer make the glue? 

Why is the world so big? 
What makes the sun rise? 
Why do they call it a guinea pig?' 
What makes us have such size? 

By Julie Winters, II, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Winten. 
Mn. Sandra Alley, teacher. 



Sammy 



Once there lived a cat named Sammy. Sammy 
always had to be first at everything. Everyday the 
raccoons, rabbits, squirrels, and Sammy met in 
the woods to play a game. 

If they played soccer with an acorn, Sammy 
would have to kick first. If they played football 
with an acorn, Sammy would have to run it first. 
If they got a drink. Sammy would have to be first. 
If someone got to the fountain before Sammy, he 
would push them out of the way. Soon Sammy's 
friends were getting tired of him doing everything 
himself and being first all the time. They decided 
to teach him a lesson. 

The next day Sjimmy went to the woods, but 
none of his friends was there. Sammy decided to 
go find out where his friends were. He went to Mr. 
Squirrel's house. 

"Mr. Squirrel, are you home?" Sammy cried. 

No one answered. 

Then he went to Mr. Rabbit's house. Sammy 
yelled, "Are you home, Mr. Rabbit?" Sjammy 
heard nothing. 

Finally Sammy went to Mr. Raccoon's house. 
Sammy screamed, "Mr. Raccoon, please come 
play with me." He saw nothing and no one an- 
swered. Sammy went home very depressed. 

The next day Sammy went back to the woods. 
While he was walking, he decided that he wasn't 
going to be first for a while. When Sammy came 
to the woods, all his friends were there waiting for 
him. Sammy and his friends had such a good time 
that day. Everyone was very happy. 

Moral: Being selfish can make you very lonely. 

B> Kim Rogers. 12, daughter of IVflke and Pam Rogen. 1^. 
Joanne French, teacher. 



So the next day Charlie went ground collecting 
sticks and leaves. He first built a frame with 
sticks. Then he pasted the leaves on with mud. 
When the mud had dried, Charliie tied the wings to 
his back. 

"Now I will climb the tallest tree," shispered 
Charlie to himself. 

Charlie meandered through the forest. He 
looked at every tree. "None of these is tall 
enough," he thought. 

Just then Charlie spotted a tall, thick, redwood 
tree. He climbed it as fast as he could. Finally he 
reached the top. 

"Now my wish shall come true!" he shouted at 
the top of his lungs. Then Charlie took a deep 
breath and jumped. He glided a fpw feet and then 
one of his wings snapped. 

The next thing Charlie knew he was in bed and 
he had two broken arms. 

Moral: The wishbone will never replace the 
iMckbonc. 

By MHody McDoraM, 12, daaghlcr of Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
McDomM. Mn. Jmbm FrcKb, teacher. 



My Place 



Across some vast fields yotw^n see the ocean. 
In the fields are stone walls. In the morning you 
can see the sun rise and make a glare on the wet 
sand, as the waves crash on the rocks. 
By Tommy Hayca, 12, km of Bob ami Elaine Hayes. Mn. 
dandU Writhl, teacher. 



George 



Charlie's Wish 



Long ago, deep in the forest lived some 
squirrels. One squirrel's name was Charlie. 

Charlie loved to sit in the trees and watch the 
birds soar high in the sky. His one wish was to fly 
with them. 

One day Charlie had asked his mom why he 
couldn't Hy. 

"You are a squirrel," replied his mother. 

"So why can't squirrels fly?" whined Charlie. 

"We cannot fiy because God didn't make us 
with wings," answefed his mother. 

Charlie thought a moment and then he said, "I 
will make my own wings." 



There once was a turtle named George. He was 
really a very nice turtle, but nobody liked him 
because he was so small. 

At school George was left out of all the games. 
Once he begged the other animals to let him play 
soccer with them. The fox said, "Bug off, you lit- 
tle runt. We don't want you to play with us. Why 
that soccer ball is even bigger than you are. Go 
away!" 

One day the fox and the rabbit were passing by 
George's house. George came out and offered 
each of them a piece of candy. The fox snatched 
his piece of candy away from George and gobbled 
it down. The rabbit, who was a good friend of 
George's took the candy politely and replied, 
"thanks." 

After the fox had left, the rabbit asked, "Why 
afe you SO nice to the fox when he is so unkind to 
• you?" 

George replied, "I know how it feels to have 
your feelings hurt, so 1 try to be nice to everyone." 

"I still don't think you should be so nice to 
him," said the rabbit. 

The next day at school, George gave everyone in 
his class a cookie except for the fox. When the fox 
asked why he didn't get a cookie, George said, 
"You've never done anything nice for me, so why 
should I be nice to you? If you promise to be nice 
to me, then, I'll bring you a cookie tomorrow." 

The fox promised that he wouldn't be mean to 
George, and after this, the fox and George were 
good friends. From this experience, the fox lear- 
ned an important lesson. 

Moral: Treat othcn as you would want them to 
treat yon. 

By Liaa Smith, 12, daughlcr of Mr. aad Mn. Paul Smith. Mn. 
Joanne French, tcaclMf. 



William Ely Honored By Lynnhaven DAR 



Mr. William W. Eley 
has been honored by 
Lynnhaven Parish Chap- 
ter National Society 
Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution with the 
presentation of the 
National Society's History 
Award Medal. 



ThS'S"! Ill" 



ONYo'S""" 





This medal "may be 
awarded to any citizen of 
the United States of 
America who has made 
outstanding contributions 
to his or her communuity 
through the study and 
promotion of American 
History". This medal is 
awarded only with the ap- 
proval of the Historian 
General, NSDAR. 

As the only Historian 
teaching in the area, Mr. 
Eley is the Social Studies 
Department Chairman at 
Green Run High School 



and teaches World 
History and Advance 
Placement Virginia and 
United States History. He 
also co-sponsors the 
Green Run Historical 
Society, a group of stu- 
dents which m«t monthly 
to discuss history and plan 
trips to historical sites. 

The results of Mr. 
Eley's historical research, 
"Princess Anne County - 
When The British Were 
Here", "The Battle of 
Kcmpsville" and "RooU 
Of Slavery In Princess 



Anne County" have been 
printed. He is presently 
researching and compiling 
a history of the Civil War 
in the Tidewater area. He 
has made a contribution 
of mounted clippings 
about the Revolutionary 
War in the Tidewater area 
to the Virginia Beach 
Library Reference 
Division. 

A graduate of East 

Carolina University with a 

Master's Degree from the 

University of Virginia, 

See ELY, Page 6 



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WE WILL HELP GET IT OUT OF YOUR WAY 



He can fill all your construction needs 



THIS IS NOI OUR AD BUT, 
ONE FOR OUR CUSTOMERS 

Our organizaUon kas thrived for Ave years wiihout advertisement. 
Our customer rvferrai* fctve iiepl us bus) and we would like you to 
consider us for that upcoming addition, impro^emenl or remodeling 
lob. Your home, office or bMiiKH b JiiM a reference away. We do the 
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(t Virginia BeMti Sun. March 9, 1983 



Yirsinia Beach Sun Hews 




LanyLaRana 



atizenOfTheWeek 



PaviUon Grounds Upkeeper 



Oiisea of ike wcek^s week b Larry LaRossa, 
a 25 y^r<ki \%iua Beach native who is 
respoBftk far i^^oeeiwit of groinds at the 
V%^Ba Beack ftviliaD. 

I^OB imMint iMskes Kid shrubs around the 
o ca wi ea ri oa cewer to mownif the gnss between 
dK &CHV taMes of faiterstate 44, LaRossa is 
oaaa^wi » keeiwig the Pa\ili<n looking great. 

"There ut alwi^ a kx of impoctaM e^nu 
foi^ oo and dwasfs a kx of naportaot people 
here," he s«d. ""rte giei^st reward <rf my job 
COOKS when one of those peofde teUs ik how akx 
the grounds knk. And tlKy tell me thtt all the 



"Itsny has woriged very dil^mly for us sian 
he ftst caaK here neuly six years ago." said 
Hewy taiz, s^periot^ideM oTgraUMfe BUOMe- 
nmce far the cky of >%iBia Beach. He explained 
th« LaBflssa bc««i hb dty career « i«e 20 as a 
Grauadsheeper One. He was iKoraoted to 
QrouMlsheeper Tluee is 1900, and wu gi^n the 
rcspoKftttty ot maiataining the city's newest 
showpiece, the I^vttaK. 

"We weren't taking a ga^ik with Uny," 
KHZSMd. "We tod ^eady had abovK tteee and a 



half years to gauge his reliability and loyalty. He 
had a strong background in horticulture, and he 
had a good eye for aesthetic values. He was the 
ivime candidate for the job, and the results, I 
think, speak for themselves." 

U*s all in a day's work, according to LaRossa. "I 
just like bemg outdoors." he said. "This job 
abnost isn't a job; it's fun." 

LaRossa has attended horticulture classes at 
Tidewater Community College, and he plans to 
re(»ve a degree in the future. "I've sort of put 
my education on hold for a while, but I do plan to 
finish it some day." 

On weekends, LaRossa and his brother, Steve. 
27, race dragsters at the Suffolk Speedway, "h's 
kind <rf funny," said LaRossa. "I work outdoors 
all week and then on weekends I work with cars. 
My dad selb cars all week and then on weekends 
he works in the yard." 

LaRossa's tether, Mauro, is emplc^'ed K a 
salesman at Hall Pontiac in Virginia Be«:h. He 
and his wife, Mary, reside in Kempsvilfe. 
LaRossa has another brother, Ckry, who is his 
twin. 



Ely Wins History Medal Award 



Mr. Bey is a aeater <tf 
the PriKCSS Amk 
Historical Sooeiy aad has 
bKB f^st ^oJ^cr at 
neetiags of lo»l 
ar§uazit3ami em Mpisof 



hiaorical interest. He was 
the specter at te George 
Washington Birthday 
Liwc h coB , s p OB to r ed by 
■iae vea DAR <Aapws, 
where the i^eMatation 
w«s BHKle bf Mrs. Joseoh 
L. Brand. R^cat of 



Lym^voi Pari^ Chap- Outstanding American 
t9. Histc^ Teacbo^ C(mtest 

and was the iKmiinee of 
the Virginia City Schools* 
for the Virginia CouikjI 
for tlK Soc»l &u^es Out- 
standing Social StiMlies 
Teach« Awwd 1982. 



Mr. Eley w«s spons<»^ 
by the chapter in the 
Vir^nia Daughto^ of the 
American Revolution 



A^umDnmks 



Public Urged To Join Fight 




hObaards and are finally startii^ to get \tTs, very ooaqsicx isaie, 

^yi paaen oi iIk tiaiiqiaign %" and Uioe is no one ^ 

^P,,jj as wdL DcVcnny sakl s^ b swer." 

^ Bc !■■■ nc¥c«ii^, c^BT- optiBBsic that c^>oatiM) 

' ^^ pasoB of Ae ma^r's I^ojeo R„A.I.D. wiH he^ 

it *iv- poike in tter cfT<»ts. 

■c fa^ a ■« "" ^"^ fK\ wt em at "Vm ootn Am this wffl 

J l^K \^ I JIBM As^^ l^tavf ^s^^ yJMMja ** ^^# ^^|j| 

"riMi IMvaag, '"We have to take even 

the ^fans irf i^sproach wccaa to oa»- 

fhe pehce aad cpKCfaed bat dnrt drii^i«. it is a 
"Fm very 





•nWeN« 
vfim far whaif w 




BevFulk 

Amtmnces 
JhgOpmmgOf 

B. B. Fulk 




$g47-B IHa^tf fUl Drive 
23Sa2 

PhoM 461-3515 




Voice Of The People 



Should City Adopt Stricter Gun Controls? 



(SMWoryMow) 







"KMrt. / tkUtk it 
hxmM be a good kkB. A 
lot of people remlly 
shouldmU have gmns. 
Kids, for esampk, ^ 
don't know kow to kmh 
dk them, emd a lot of 
times tlUy acddmiMy 
sho*M ^eHuehm. Al^ 
peoph tkat kave beam 
declared mmtidly jncomt' 
petemt xAoMltf not be 
idlowed 19 kave puts. 
ThM's jorr e/ fifcr kam- 
ding matekn to a 
pyromaniec," 

aupNoweU 

Shident 

Nine-year resident 



'Wo, I dmi't thmk so. 
Tkere mtt thready way 
too many damn lews 
around here. Between 
cHy laws, the state knn 
and the. federal lews, 
tkere is jua too much 
to contend with. B^ies, 
(fsmn^ody w^mts to get 
a gun, Ae c»i gH it just 
by gobig to Hampton. 
New rtsnictluns would 
Jutt add kasdes to our 
lives tkat we don't 
need." 

David Cutri^ 

&icklayer's helper 

Three-year resident. 



"Yes, the city should 
definitely impose 
tmigker requkv^Msfor 
buying kandguns. There 
tna wkoklot of people 
out there who are 
unaware of the damage a 
pm am rmdiy do; like 
children and insane 
people. Also, if 
somebody is a convicted 
criminal, he shouldn 't be 
able to buy a gun." 

Jeff Ferrier 

Student 

Five-year midrat 



•'/ think imposing 
more stringent require- 
ments is a very good 
Itka. As for the people 
me the National Rifle 
Assocktlon who are op- 
posed to such moves, I 
don 't give a damn about 
than; they are wrong. 
My thought Is this: our 
Uves wouU be a lot bet- 
ter off if there wen no 
guns in this world. ' ' 

David Polatty 

Retired 

12-year resident 



Council Actions 



New Gun Proposals 



More than 35 dti^ns ^^>arently believe that no gun 
permit law is a good gun permit law. 

And many more oUled in the Viiiinia Beach Qty 
Qerk's office to haw their names read at a recent 
Council meeting as being oi^xxed to an amendment 
clarifying a gun permit law that has been on the books. 
Qty Ckrk Ruth Hodges Smith read the list of names 
before Council and ashed tlKise at tlK Council session to 
meet with Assistant to the Oty Manager Giles Dodd to 
let their wishes be knowii. 

Wh^ the 35 or 40 persons there wanted, Dodd said. 
is to repeal the onfiaance entirdy and to put none in its 
l^ace. He said thtt the group consisted ot representa- 
tives (rf^the National Rifle Assodation, business peof^ 
who sell goBs and mdividuals with their own 
convktioK. 

Coumsl deferred consideration oi the ordinance for 
90 days. A cky ordinaace already requires that the 
IMUthase of a handgun be permitted only with a permit 
granted by the daef o( pohce or ha debated office, 
in writmg. AH the unendsKnt (hd was to specify 
conditions untkr «1udi no permit wiQ be issued. These 
indude that no permit be issued to any person uiKier 
tlK age (rf 18, any convicted fekn. any person under 
indian^nt or infomatian far a felony, any person who 
at the time of jappBoKian b charged with a aime 
invching viol»oe, i^ person who hu been fouiKi to 
be MX ginlQr of a fehaqr on the b^is of insanity , any 
person who is a f^dwe ftnoi jwtice, any person who 
presently k «b ^tewfcl iser of or adttoed to 
nwijuma. a dqpmiM, sto^aat or aavootic drag, 
and any person «te has been co mnAted to a mes^ 



institution. 

Councilman Dr. J. Henry M<^:by Jr. said that be 
received a call firom a man whose wife gave him a gim. 
Since the ordinance prohitnts giving a handgun to 
anyone, the wife was in vioiatioa d the ordinance. 
McCoy said that to get the information required from a 
computer may take tinK. b the interim the individual 
will go to a nearby dty where the laws are less 
stringent. 

Councilwoman Meyera Obemdorf said she had 
received calls from people who are ancemed. Sie said 
under the law a person could not loan a pistol to 
someone at. a firing range. She said that some 
individu^ need to train far shooting competitions. 

McCojf said that he agreed with the o^xsition that 
the verbage was not too good, but that the Utw has been 
ttoe. He said Ik tlunks it's unfair mM to be aUe to give 
a gun or to fend agun or toconpete with other dties for 
the business. 

Dodd said the people aiqMoently were not aware 
there was any law. 



C[c 



Cross-Lites says: 
'*Gotl*s love is a constant love, *' 



Virginia's Largest 

FARM EQUIPMENT 

AUCTION 

Saturday, March 26, 1983 

9:30 a.m. 

Location: 4 miles west of Franklin, Va. on Hwy. 58 



TnidB 
Tutos 



•Tradirs 

•E^ilMMtt 



•Itar 




ogM OB knmu¥ m checms 




Virginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 7 



y ir3inia Beach City Council By i^um 



9 



Beach Council A ctions 




John A. Bbhiii 
Bteckwaier 



Nmicj A. Creech BarlMni M. Henley HaroM Hetadiober H. J«eli Je«m«ti LwtoR.Jow. 

AlUrte Pnago Al-Uf«e LyMlw*e« BayiWe 






Robert G. Jones 
Al-Large 



W. H. KilcMn, III 
Virginia Beach 



RebaS. McClanan 
Princess Anne 



J. Henry McCoy, Jr. 
Kempsvllle 



Meycra Obcrndurf 
Al-Large 



Meeting Date, Monday, March 7, 1983 Absent: Robert G. Jones, Reba McClanan 



if Informal Session 

BosketbaH 

Mayor Louis R. Jones announced the annual basiietball 
dassic Marcli 1 1 , pitting City Council against the city staff at 
the Konpsville Community Center. 

Birthday C«l«bratioii 

Vice Mayor Barbara Henley asked for additions to the list of 
groups of people who will be invited to an-April 24 ceremony 
celebrating the city's 20th anniversary. 

Kiiotto Island 

Vice Mayor Barbara Henley instructed the Planning Depar- 
tment to recommend zoning policies which reflect the unique 
circumstances of Knotts Island properties. She made the 
request in connection with an application for a variance from a 
Knotts Island property owner which will be before Council on 
March 28. The Planning Commission recommended denial. 

NaiMHiuii Control 

Councilman John A. Baum suggested that the city's or- 
dinance on handgun control, deferred last week, be placed on 
the agenda for next Monday. 

Toxic Wasto 

Couiyilwoman Meyera Oberndorf gave a report on the 
disposal of toxic waste discussed at a conference of the 
National League of Cities over the weekend. 

Driving Undor Tho Infflnonco 

Coimcilman Harold Heischober asked for the appointment 
of an ad hoc committee to study "Driving Under The Influen- 
ce" problem- ' 



Public Noaring 



Papor Work 



Councilman Jack Jennings Jr. asked City Manager Thomas 
H. Muehlenbeck to furnish summaries along with lengthy 
reports furnished to Council to cut down on the myriad of 
paper work facing Council each week. 



Councilman W. H. Kitchin III said that he would sponsor 
Charles Bowden in submitting a request before Council under 
the new business portion of the formal Council meeting. The 
matter concerned furnishing city water to a four-unit sub- 
division. 

Cox Cablo Magazino 

Councihnan Jack Jennings Jr. reported com.plaints of con- 
stituents that Cox subscribers ure being charged SI a month for 
a magazine containing cable schedules. 

North Boach Dralnago 

Public Works Director Oral Lambert and City Engineer Don 
Trueblood presented a report on options to handle the drainage 
in North Virginia Beach. 

Landfill #1 

City Planning Director Robert Scott recommended treating 
the expansion of Landfill « off CenterviUe Turnpike as a 
public buildings and grounds project under the present zoning 
rather than change the zoning on the land. 

Uconto Tax 

Council discussed losses in business, professional and Oc- 
cupational license taxes under new State laws. 

rannort Markot 

Councilman Jack Jennings Jr. asked that the Farmers 
Market item in the Consent Agenda be withdrawn. 

■xocotivo Sosslon 

Councilman Jack Jennings Jr. called for an executive session 
concoTiing the Library Board. 



if Formal Session 




xjhe Corvette Specialists 

~~/' ' Are Now 

ThiDatsun Z Car Specialists 



•Free Estimates On 
•Datsuns & Corvettes 
•Major & Minor Bodywork 
•Fiberglass Replacement Pan^ 
•Custom Paint 
•Rust Repair , 



144 So. Military Hwy. 
466-9443 



Councilwoman Meyera Oberndorf read a letter from John 
Perry, chairman of the Citizens Advisory Council on Com- 
munity Development program, presenting the ninth year 
program pf the Community Development program in Virginia 
Beach. City Manager Thomas H. Muehlenbeck was directed to 
return with a recommendation. Of the $2,634,000 which will be 
available. 

available, $2,574,000 is the entitlement for the year and 
$60,000 is prc^am income from various sources. 

Consent Agenda 

•Ordinance to amend and reordain Section 1 1-9 of the Code 
of the City of Virginia Beach pertaining to rental charges and 
periods for the Farmer's Market. Deferred two weeks. 

•Ordinance to transfer Capital Project Funds of $300,000 
from Chesapeake Beach Drainage Prpject (C.l.P. 2-817) to the 
development of Independence and Buckner Boulevards (C.l.P. 
2-995). (This mailer was deferred for one week on February 28, 
1983.) Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance approving the terms and conditions of an 
agreement for consulting services between the City of Virginia 
Beach and Roy Mann Associates, Inc.; Authorizing and direc- 
ting the City Manager to execute the approved agreement and 
authorizing the City Manager to implement the terms and 
provisioits of the approved agreement and transferring funds 
of $150,000. Approve49-0. 

•Ordinance, on second reading, to 'a^jjirbprlate ttihtfe of 
$1,688,828 to establish a School Textbook Rental Fund FY 
1982-83 Budget. Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance, on second reading, to appropriate funds of 
$1,010,00 for the Tidewater Builders Association Scholarship 
House. Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance to authorize a temporary encroachment into a 
portion of the right-of-way of 24th Street to Sandollar 
Associates. Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance to aiithorize a temporary encroachment into a 
portion of the right-of-way of a City 15' paper street to Allen 
Richter, his heirs, assigns and successors in title. Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance to authorize a temporary encroachment into a 
portion of the right-of-way of the southwest corner of In- 
dependence Boulevard and Ewell Road to Lake Smith Terrace 
Garden Club. Approved 90. 

•Ordinance to authorize a temporary encroachment into a 
portion of the right-of-way of Regency Drive to the Regency 
Apartmenu. Approved 9-0. 

•Raffle Permits: Kings Grant Elementary Scho^ i*TA, 
Bayside Junior High School Band Parents' Association, 
Kingston PTA, Bayside High School Band ParenU'- 
Association. Approved 9-0. 

if Planning Items 

•Ordinance closing, vacating and discontinuing a portion of 
Shore Drive located west of Croix Drive in the petition of 
Virginia Beach Resort Conference Hotel (Lynnhaven 
Borough). Letter from the City Manager transmiu the recom- 
nKndation of the Planning Commission, and the Viewers con- 
cur, for denial. Denied 9-0. 

•Ordinance closing, vacating and discontinuing^ portion of 
Shore Drive located west of Beech Street in the petition of Bay 
Front Associates, Ltd. (Lynnhaven Borough). Letter from the 
City Manager transmits the recommendation of the Planning 
Commi^ion, and the Viewers concur, for denial. Denied 9-0. 



if Ordinance 



Ordinance to amend and remdain Sections 18-52 (a), 18-53 
(a) through (c), 18-55 (a), 18-56 (b) and (c), 18-73 (a), 18-75 (a), 
18-80 (a), 18-85. 18-88 fa). I8-J9 (a). 18-91 (c), 18-99 (a>. 18- 
lOO.I (a), 18-101 (a). 18-102 (a), and 18-1 13 (b) of the Code of 
the City of Virginia Beach relating to Business, Professional 
and Occupational Licojse Taxes. City Manager recommends 
apptmaX . Approved 9-0. 

• Unfinished Business 

•Request of R. G. Moore Building Corporation for waiver 
of restrictions on a 35.5-aae parcel. Bay Lake Beach - Ocean 
See COUNCIL, P««e 11 



Council Discusses Executive Session 



Continued from Page 1 

Councilman John A. Baum delayed his eriTfrom the 
Council Chambers to try to convince HentejAto change 
her mind. "I think a lot of Barbara," he sm later. 

After the 20-minute session, Councilman Harold 
Heischober moved to defer the item for one week, 
Baum launched a highly emotional attack ai the action 
of Henley and Oberndorf while directing most of his 
comments to Oberndorf, while Councilman Dr. J. 
Henry McCoy agreed with Baum and said that a couple 
of members "made us look bad." 

Baum termed the action of Henley and 'Oberndorf 
"demogc^uery" and said, "I'm getting sick of it." 

The item, which was under unfinished business, 
invdvcd the request of R-G. Mowe Building Copora- 
tion to have removed restrictions on a 35.5 acre— parcel 
in the Bay Lake Beach-Ocean Park area in the Bayside 
Borough calling for setbacks of 250 feet and 150 feet for 
all buildings from the prci?crty lines on the west and 
south sides respectively. 

Grovcr Wright, attorney fcr Moore, said that the 
restrictions should no longer be in effect since the use 
permit under which they were included had been 
withdrawn. Area residents object to removing the 
restrictions because they fear an increase in density in 
the area. Approximately 50 area residents showed up to 
oppose the request. So did a court reporter, always a 
harbinger of a suit in court. She was employed by 
Wright. 

Whichever way Council voted, it looked as though 
the city would be invdved in a law suit. 

After listening to both sides for more than a half 
hour. Councilman Dr. J. Henry "McCoy Jr. moved for an 
executive session, secaided by Councilwoman Nancy 
Creech. The vote was 7-2 with Henley and Oberndorf 
dissenting. Councilman Robert G. Jones and Owmcil- 
woman Reba McQanan were absent. 

It wasn't the first time Council had interrupted the 
business at hand to go into executive sessirai. During 
the 1980 mayoral electi(Mi, Council went into executive 
session more than once before deciding upon McCoy 
over Oberndorf. At that time, McQanan had voted 
against the executive session and remained outside. 

When Council returned, Heischober said that in view 
of the fact that "additional information of consequence 
was received and heard from Wright," Qty Council felt 
it should COTfcr with the city attorney. He said the 
Council would like to please everyone but that this was 
nd Dossible. „ 

He said the Council found it "absolutely necessary 
to discuss legal matters with the city attorney and the 
rights, equities and disposition of this-concern as well 
as the remedy fcff the pec^le. He moved to defer the 
item for one week! Council aooroved unanimously. 

Mayor Jones then instructed the two sides to get 
together to work out an amicable agreement in a 
manner acceptable to both parties. 

Baum then unleashed his rebuke. He said it was 
proper to go into executive sessirai far a legal matter. 
He said he had gtme through trial by press once (he 
rcfered to the incident when Council members had 
been charged with meeting scifon^ly in^^k)rth Cardina. 
He said it was not proper for 'individual Council 
members to decide something immoral was gwng on in 
the back roOTi. "Who else would consuh lawyers in 
public?" he asked. He said Council did that once in the 
case of Lakeside Ccmstruction, to its regret. _, 

Then he said, "Meyera, you've accused us of 
violating the freedwn of informatiai act (in the past)." 
He added she accused the School Board of meeting in 
Williamsburg. Also, in violation of the freedom of 
informatiai act, and one week later expressed 
disappdntment that no progress had been made in 
consolidating of services of the School Board and 
Council. He askedwhether she actually expected some 
progress after the accusati(Mis. 

He said the Council had a murky matter before it no 
n&ttei which way it went. He pointed out that Grover 
Wright's clients don't ccmstrft hipi in public. "What is 
wrong with going into executive session?" 

Henley replied that she was sorry Council had to be 
airing its dirty linens in public. She said she had asked 
the mayor and Council whether there was any new 
information had received no answer. She said this was 
the first time this had occurred and that her action in no 
way was passing judgment on the other members who 
attended the meeting. If Council could not make the 
decision, it could always defer the matter which 
would give the Camcil an interim in which to ccmfer, 

she said. ., , . 

McCoy said that he felt like Baum. that Council had 
to get with its attwney. "We see a court repeater taking 
every word... a couple of members made us look bad..." 

Heischober said that it was too bad that two serious, 
well-thinking members of Council took the position they 
did. He said that Council does not need new evidence or 
information to call an executive session. Then, 
addressing the audience, he said, "You, the citizens, 
are the ones whose monev is gdng to pay for the legal 
costs. All we want are the applicant and the citizens to 
be able to spend a little more time to (find a viable 
solution) instead of going into cairt." 

Baum noted that Council discwitinued recwding 




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executive sessions because of the legal problems which 
arcKe a few years ago when Council's tapes were 
subpoenaed. He said that the exposition to an executive 
session was the smartest political thing to do. 

He said later that "pe^ulism is 85 percent 
demogoguery. It's good politics to take sane pc^ular 
action that has no chance of success, he said. 

By trying to please a crowd, you're fooling them and 
foding yourself. He suJmitted that "all of us want to 
please a crowd," but that "you can't expect to get 
(legal) advice publicly. 

He said Council made a mess so many times by 
trying to be its own lawyer. 

Oberndorf, who made no comment on her action at 
the meeting, said later that by her action she did not 
mean to cast aspersions on anyone else. If one needs to 
cwisult an attorney, she said, the matter can be 
deferred to give Council the opportunity to explore. She 
said she was not ctmifwtable with setting a precedent, 
and that the legal aspects had been discussed at an 
executive session before the formal sessiai. The 
Council ran that session a half hour into the formal 
meeting. 

She said she did not believe in going along to get 
along because it would mean giving up her basic 
beliefs. She said it isn't wath it. She said she did not 
hear them say anything new. 



Creators «fNfj>fodhfMn of vnaNiy, low cost 

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AndCIRCUUkRS 



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BYERLY PUBUCATIOHS 



M (27-5020 



Wright tdd Council that he needed Council to direct 
the staff to process Moore's site plan in accord with the 
zoning regulations. Hfc said that one restriction is 
applicable, requiring a 75-focil buffer strip, because it 
was recorded in the cleric's office in May 1975. 

The property was originally zoned under former 
Princess Anne County ordinances for duplexes and was 
rezoned (Ml Aug. 7, 1972 to mufti-family. At that time, a 
use permft also was needed for multi-family construc- 
tioi, and one was granted for 385 units including a 
high-rise structure. The 250-foot and 150-foot setback 
restrictions went with the use permit. However when 
the property was rezoned under the Comprehensive 
Zoning Ordinance (CZO) in 1973, the property was 
rezoned R-9 (roughly nine units per acre) while 
normally property zoned multifamily was zoned A-1, 
Apartment District, under the new CZO, Wright said. 

He said the use permit was never activated and 
expired on Feb. 7, 1974. The city officially rescinded 
the use permft on Jan. 18, 1979. Without the use 
permit, Wright maintained, the restrictions also are not 
applicable. Mowe wants his new site plan to be 
processed. 

City Planning Director ftctotti Scott said that about 
50 units were built in the early '70's on part of the site. 

Wright maintained that the restrictiois do not apply 
any longer and the site has to be develt^d under the 
R-9 zoning classification. 

Heischober said that the parcial originally contained 
43 acres and that Water Oaks was buift on 7'/i acres 

along the beach frw^- 

Tom Ackiss, of 2401 Lookout Pant, Baylakc Pines, 
said the city had installed a pumping station and tewer 
lines in the buffered area. 

Scott said he did not think the property was 
downwMied as claimed by Wright. He said the R-9 

See EXECUTIVE, Page 11 



Editorial 

Continued from Page 2 

them might be acceptable. Ideally, 
however, the advertising on them should 
concern only Virginia Beach businesses 
and activities, and not serve as lures from , 
other localities to draw the city's residents - 
and tourists out of Virginia Beach. 

Through the cooperative efforts ot 
several local legislators, the 1983 General 
Assembly has allocated $2 million for the 
Virginia Museum of Marine Sciences, 
although the funding is conditional. That 
means the city will receli'e the funds if the 
state has them. / 

Nonetheless, the news is a significant 
breakthrough, financially and morally, 1 
for ail those concerned parties who have - 
braved strong winds and high surf in their 
efforts to see the museum become a 
reality. Let's just keep our fingers 
crossed. — G.D.G. 



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LYNNHAVEN 



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Owner 



Transmission • Brakes • Tune up 
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6r Virginia Beach Sun. March 9, 1983 



Yirsinia Beach Sun Hews 




Larry LaRosM 



Citizen Of The Week 



Pavilion Grounds Upkeeper 



Gtizen of the week this week is Larry LaRossa, 
a 25 year-oid Virginia Beach native who is 
responsible for upkeeping of grounds at the 
Virginia Beach Pavilion. 

From pruning bushes and shrubs around the 
convention center to mowing the grass between 
the facing lanes of Interstate 44. LaRossa is 
committed to keeping the Pavilion looking great. 

"There are always a lot of important events 
gdng on and always a lot of impcH-tant people 
here." he said. "The greatest reward of my ')cto 
cones when om of those people tells me how nice 
the grounds look. And they tell me that all the 
time." 

"Larry has worked very diligently for us since 
he first came here nearly six years ago," said 
Henry Ruiz, supeitiiiUmdtnt (^ giOtihds mainte- 
nance fa- the dty of Virginia Beach. He explained 
that LaRossa began his dty career at age 20 as a 
Groundskeeper One. He was promoted to 
Ooundskeeper Tlu'ee in 1980. and was given the 
responsibility of maintaining the city's newest 
showpiece, the Pavilion. 

"We weren't taking a gamble with Larry," 
Ruiz said. "We had already had about three and a 



half years to gauge his reliability and loyalty. He 
had a strong background in horticulture, and he 
had a good eye for aesthetic values. He was the 
prime candidate for the job, and the results, 1 
think, speak for themselves." 

It's all in a day's work, accord^ to LaRossa. "I 
just like being outdoors." he raid. "This job 
almost isn't a job; it's fun." 

LaRossa has attended horticulture classes at 
Tidewater Community College, and he plans to 
receive a degree in the future. "I've sort of put 
my education on hdd for a while, but 1 do plan to 
finish it some day." 

On weekends, LaRossa and his brother, Steve, 
27, race dragsters at the SufTdk Speedway, "it's 
kind of funny," said LaRossa. "I work outdoors 
all week and then on weekends 1 work with cars. 
My dad sells cars all week and then on weekends 
he works in the yard." 

LaRossa's father, Mauro, is employed as a 
salesman at Hall Pwitiac in Virginia Beach. He 
and his wife, Mary, reside in Kempsville. 
LaRossa has another brother, Gary, who is his 
twin. 



Ely Wins History Medal Award 



Continued from Pate S 

Mr. Eley is a member of 
the l*rincess Anne 
Historical Society and has 
been guest speaker at 
meetings of local 
(f ganizations on topics of 



Against Drunks 



historical interest. He was 
the speaker at the George 
Washington Birthday 
Luncheon, sponsored by 
nine area DAR chapters, 
where the presentation 
was made by Mrs. Joseph 
L. Brand, Regent of 



Lynnhaven Parish Chap- Outstanding American 
ter. (^ History Teacher Contest 

was the nominee of 
the'^irginia City Schools* 
for trie Virginia Council 
for theXSocial Studies Out- 
standing Social Studies 
Teacher Award 1982. 



Mr. Eley was sponsored 
by the chapter in the 
Virginia Daughters of the 
American Revolution 



Public Urged To Join Fight 



Continued from Page 1 

\(S Hymouth, joined Wall 
in fighting drunk drivers. 
"We, the car dealers, are 
the ones providing the 
public with the potential 
weapois and we feel a 
responsibility to couch 
that," he said. 

Heischober said he has 
convinced around 40 other 
automobile dealers in the 
Tidewater area to dis- 
pense literature about the 
dangers of drinking and 
driving. "We can be the 
focal point for this effort." 
He said that car dealers 



may use billboards and 
posters in the campaign 
as well. 

Lillian DeVenny, chair- 
person of the mayw's 
committee on drunk driv- 
ing and vice-president of 
the Virginia Beach Many 
Against Orunk Driving, 
applauded the efforts of 
the pdtke and concerned 
citizens. "I'm very 
pleased that everyone is 
finally beginning to work 
in conjuncticm with each 
other," she said. "We've 
been trying for so long to 
get some recognition and 
cooperation, and now we 



are finally starting to get 
it." 

DeVenny said she is 
optimistic that operation 
Project R.A.I. D. will help 
police in their efforts. 
"I'm certain that this will 
assist them," she said. 
"We have to take every 
approach we can to com- 
bat drunk driving. It is a 



very, very complex issue, 
and there is no one an- 
swer." 





DvVtMy (I) Mid Hd i ctobw 




Bev Fulk 

Announces 
The Opening Of 

B. B. Fulk 

Optical Compan.v 



5847-B Poplar Hall Drive 

Norfolk, Virginia, 23502 
(Beside Military Circle - Across From Leggetts) 

Phone 461-3515 



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Ray-Ban 
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Magniflers 



Voice Of The People 



Should City Adopt Stricter Gun Controls? 



(SwSUMylriM*) 




"Yeah, I thUtk it 
would be a good idea. A 
lot of people really 
shouldn't have guns. 
Kids, for example. Just 
don't know how to han- 
dle them, and a lot of 
times they accidentally 
shoot themselves. Also, 
people that have Iteen 
declared mentally incom- 
petent should not be 
allowed to have guns. 
That's sort of like han- 
ding matches to a 
pyromaniae. " 

Skip Newell 

Studoit 

Nine-year resident 



"No, I don't think so. 
There are t/dready way 
too many damn laws 
around here. Between 
city laws, the state laws 
and the^ federal laws, 
there is just too much 
to contend with. Besides, 
if somebody wants to get 
a gun, he can get it just 
by going to Hampton. 
New restrictions would 
just add hassles to our 
lives that we don 't 
need." 

David Cutright 

Bricklayer's helper 

Three-year resident. 



"Yes, the city should 
definitely Impose 
tougher requirements for 
buying handguns. There 
are a whole lot ofpedple 
out there who are 
unaware of the damage a 
gun can really do; like 
children and Insane 
people. Also, If 
somebody is a convicted 
criminal, he shouldn 't be 
able to buy a gun." 

Jeff Fcrrier 

Student 

Five-year resident 



•7 think imposing 
more stringent require- 
ments is a very good 
idea. As for the people 
like the National Rifle 
Association who are op- 
posed to such moves, I 
don V give a damn about 
them; they are wrong. 
My thought Is this: our 
Uves would be a lot bet- 
ter off If there were no 
guns In this world." 

David Polatty 

Retired 

12-ycar resident 



Council Actions 



New Gun Proposals 



More than 3S citizens apparently believe that no gun 
permit law is a good gun permit law. 

And many more called in the Virginia Beach Oty 
Qerk's office to have their names read at a recent 
Council meeting as being opposed to an amendment 
clarifying a gun permit law that has been on the books. 
City Clerk Ruth Hodges Smith read the list of names 
before Council and aslnd those at the Ccnincil session to 
meet with Assistant to the Gty Manager Giles Dodd to 
let their wishes be known. 

What the 35 or 40 persons there wanted, Dodd said, 
is to repeal the ordinance entirely and to put none in its 
place. He said that the group consisted of representa- 
tives of the National Rifle Association, business pecq^le 
who sell guns and individuals with their own 
ccMivictions. 

Council deferred consideration of the ordinance for 
90 days. A city ordinance already requires that the 
purchase of a handgun be permitted only with a permit 
granted by the chief of police or his designated officer, 
in writing. All the amendment did was to specify 
ccmditions under which no permit will be issued. These 
include that no permit be issued to any person under 
the age of 18, any convicted felon, any perscm under 
indictment or information for a felwiy, any person who 
at the time of application is charged with a crime 
invcdving violence, any person who has been fcxind to 
be not guilty <4 a felony on the basis of insanity, any 
person who is a fugitive from justice, any person who 
presently is an unlawful user of or addicted to 
marijauana, a depressant, stimulant or narcotic drug, 
and any person who has been committed to a mental 



instituticxi. 

Councilman Dr. J. Henry McCoy Jr. said that he 
received a call from a man whose wife gave him a gun. 
Since the (X'dinance prohibits giving a handgun to 
anyone, the wife was in vidation of the ordinance. 
McCoy said that to get the information required from a 
computer may take time. In the interim the individual 
will go to a ticStby city where the laws are less 
stringent. 

Councilwoman Meyera Obemdwf said she had 
received calls from people who are concerned. She said 
under the law a persoi could not loan a pistd to 
someone at a firing range. She said that some 
individuals need to train for shooting competitiois. 

McCoy said that he agreed with the (^position that 
the verbage was not too good, but that the law has been 
there. He said he thinks it's unfair not to be able to give 
a gun or to lend a gun or to compete with other cities for 
the business. 

Dodd said the people appaixntly were not aware 
there was any law. 



Gg 



Cross-Lltes says: 
**God*s love is a constant love, " 



Virginia's Largest 

FARM EQUIPMENT 

AUCTION 

Saturday, March 26, 1983 

9:30 a.m. 

Location: 4 miles west of Franklin, Va. on Hwy. 58 



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Sol* Will Bo Hold Rogordloss of Woothor Cwtditions 



^ 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 



Virsinia Beach City Council Byu«c.hiii 



Beach Council Actions 




JohMA.Bamn Nincj A. Creech Barban M. Henley Harold HelwAober H. Jack Jennings 

Bbckwaicr Al-Urge Pungo Al-Uife Lyaniiavea 



LoMb R. JoMt 
BayiMc 






Robert G. Jones 
Al-Urge 



W. H. Kilcbin, III 
Virginia Beacii 



RcbaS.McClaaan 
Princess AaiM 



J. Henry McCoy, Jr. 
Kempsville 



Meyera Obemdorf 
Al-Large 



Meeting Date, Monday, March 7, 1983 Absent: Robert G. Jones, Reba McClanan 



if Informal Session 

Basketball 

Mayor Louis R. Jones announced the annual basketball 
dassic March 1 1 , pitting City Council against the city staff at 
the Kempsville Community Center. 

Birthday Celabration 

Vice Mayor Barbara Henley asked for additions to the list of 
groups of people who will be invited to an-April 24 ceremony 
celebrating the city's 20th anniversary. 

Knotta Island 

Vice Mayor Barbara Henley instructed the Planning Depar- 
tment to recommend zoning policies which reflect the unique 
circumstances of Knotts Island properties. She made the 
request in connection with an application for a variance from a 
Knotts Island property owner which will be before Councij on 
March 28. The Planning Commission recommended denial. 

Handgun Control 

Councilman John A. Baum suggested that the city's or- 
dinance on handgun control, deferred last week, be placed on 
the agenda fornext Monday. 

Toxic Wasto 

Councilwoman Meyera Oberndorf gave a report on the 
disposal of toxic waste discussed at a conference of the 
National League of Cities over the weekend. 

Drivlnfi Undor Tlio Infflvonco 

CouiKilman Harold Heischober asked for the appointment 
of an ad hoc committee to study "Driving Under The Influen- 
ce" problem- 

PaporWork 

Councilman Jack Jennings Jr. asked City Manager Thomas 
H. Muehlenbeck to furnish summaries along with lengthy 
reports furnished to Council to cut down on the myriad of 
paper work facing Council each ^yeek. 



PvUicHoaring 



Sponsor 



Councilman W. H. Kitchin III said that he would sponsor 
Charles Bowden in submitting a request before Council under 
the new business portion of the formal Council meeting. The 
matter concerned furnishing city water to a four-unit sub- 
division. 

Cox Cablo iAagaxino 

Councilman Jack Jennings Jr. reported complaints of con- 
stituents that Cox subscribers are beiiig charged J I a month for 
a magazine containing cable schedules. 

North Boach Drainago 

Public Works Director Oral Lambert and City Engineer Don 
Tnieblood presented a report on options to handle the drainage 
in North Virginia Beach . 

Landfill #1 

City Planning Director Robert Scott recommended treating 
the expansion of Landfill #2 off Cenlerville Turnpike as a 
public buildings and grounds project under the present zoning 
rather than change the zoning on the land. 

LUonso Tax 

Council discussed losses in business, professional and Oc- 
cupational license taxes under new State laws. 

Pannors Markot 

Councilman Jack Jennings Jr. asked that the Farmers 
Market item in the Consent Agenda be withdrawn. 

Ixocvtivo Sosslon 

Councilman Jack Jennings Jr. called for an executivrsession 
concerning the Library Board. 



if Formal Session 



The Corvette Specialists 

Are Now 

The Datsun Z Car Specialists 



•Free Estimates On 
•Datsuns & Corvettes 
•Major & Minor Bodywork 
•Fiberglass Replacement Panels 
•Custom Paint 
•Rust Repair , 



144So.MilitaitHwy. 
466-9443 



Councilwoman Meyera ObernadiT read a letter from John 
Perry, chairman of the Citizens Advisory Council on Com- 
munity Development program, presenting the ninth year 
program of the Community Development program in Virginia 
Beach. City Manager Thomas H. Muehlenbeck was directed to 
return with a recommendation. Of the $2.6J4,000 which will be 
available. 

available, $2,574,000 is the entitlement for the year and 
S60,000 is program income from various sources. 

Consent Agenda 

•Ordinance to amend and reordain Section 1 1-9 of the Code 
of the City of Virginia Beach pertaining to rental charges and 
periods for the Farmer's Market. Deferred two weeks. 

•Ordinance to transfer Capital Project Funds of S300.000 
from Chesapeake Beach Drainage Project (C.l.P. 2-817) to the 
development of Independence and Buckner Boulevards (C.l.P. 
2-995). (This matter was deferred for one week on February 28, 
1983.) Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance approving the terms and conditions of an 
agreement for consulting services between the City of Virginia 
Beach and Roy Mann Associat«, Inc.; Authorizing and direc- 
ting the City Manager to execute the approved agreement and 
authorizing the City Manager to implement the terms and 
provisions of the approved agreement and transferring funds 
of $150,000. Approved9-0. 

•Ordinance, on second reading, to '4t(!A*prlate tintfs of 
$1,688,828 to establish a School Textbook Rental Fund FY 
1982-83 Budget. Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance, on second reading, to appropriate funds of 
$1,010.00 for the Tidewater Builders Association Scholarship 
Hoyse. Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance to authorize a temporary encroachment into a 
portion of the right-of-way of 24th Street to Sandollar 
Associates. Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance to authorize a temporary encroachment into a 
portion of the right-of-way of a City 15" paper street to Allen 
Richter, his heirs, assigns and successors in title. Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance to authorize a temporary encroachment into a 
portion of the right-of-way of the southwest corner of In- 
dependence Boulevard and Ewell Road to Lake Smith Terrace 
Garden Club. Approved 9-0. 

•Ordinance to authorize a temporary encroachment into a 
portion of the right-of-way of Regency Drive to the Regency 
Apartments. Approved 9-0. 

•Raffle Permits: Kings Grant Elementary School PTA, 
Bayside Junior High School Band Parents* Association, 
Kingston PTA. Bayside High School Band Parents' 
Association. Approved 9-0. 

if Planning Items 

•OrdinaiKe closing, vacating and discontinuing a portion of 
Shore Drive located west of Croix Drive in the petition of 
Virginia Beach Resort Conference Hotel (Lynnhaven 
Borough). Letter from the City Manager transmiu the recom- 
mendation of the Planning Commission, and the Viewers con- 
ctir, for denial. Denied 9-0. 

•Ordinance closing, vacating and discontinuing la portion of 
Shore Drive located west of Beech Street in the petition of Bay 
Front Associates. Ltd. (Lynnhaven Borough). Letter from the 
City Manager transmits the recommendation of the Planning 
Commission, and the Viewers concur, for denial. Denied 9-0. 




if Ordinance 



Ordinance to amend and reordain Sections 18-52 (a), 18-53 
(a) through (c). 18-55(a). 18-56 (b) and (c), 18-73 (a). 18-75 (a), 
18-80 (a), 18-85. 18-88 (a). 18-89 (a), 18-91 (c). 18-99 (a). 18- 
100.1 (a), 18-101 (a). 18-102 (a), and 18-1 13 (b) of the Code of 
tlw City of Virginia Beach relating to Busimss, Professional 
and Occupational License Taxes. City Mana^ recommends 
approval. Approved 9-0. 

• Unfinished Business 

•Request of R. G. Moore Building Corporation for waiver 
of restrictions on a 35.5-acre parcel. Bay Lake Beach - Ocean 
See COUNCIL. Page 1 1 



Council Discusses Executive Session 



Continued from Page I 

Councilman John A. Baum delayed his exit from the 
Qnincil Chambers to try to convince Henley to change 
her mind. "I think a lot of Barbara," he said later. 

After the 20-minute session, Councilman Harold 
Heischober moved to defer the item for one week, 
Baum launched a highly emotional attack c«i the acticm 
of Henley and Oberndorf while directing most of his 
comments to Oberndorf, while Councilman Dr. J. 
Henry McCoy agreed with Baum and said that a couple 
of members "made us look bad." 

Baum termed the actiai of Henley and 'Oberndorf 
"demogoguery" and said^ "I'm getting sick of it." 

The item, which was under unfinished business, 
invdved the request of R.G. Mo«e Building Corpora- 
tion to have rtmovcd restrictions on a 35.5 acre— parcel 
in the Bay Lake Beach-Ocean Park area in the Bayside 
Bforough calling for setbacks of 250 feet and 150 feet for 
all buildings from the property lines on the west and 
south sides respectively. 

Grover Wright, attorney for Moore, said that the 
restrictions should no longer be in effect since the use 
permit under which they were included had been 
withdrawn. Area residents object to removing the 
restrictions because they fear an increase in density in 
the area. Approximately 50 area residents showed up to 
oppose the request. So did a court reporter, always a 
harbinger of a suit in court. She was employed by 
Wright. 

Whichever way Council voted, it looked as though 
the city would be invdved in a law suit. 

After listening to both sides for more than a half 
hour, Councilman Dr. J. Henry \IcCoy Jr. moved for an 
executive session, seconded by Councilwoman Nancy 
Creech. The vote was 7-2 with Henley and Oberndcfff 
dissenting. Councilman Robert G. Jraies and Council- 
woman Reba McClanan were absent. 

It wasn't the first time Council had interrupted the 
business at hand to go into executive session. During 
the 1980 mayoral election. Council went into executive 
session more than aice before deciding upon McCoy 
over Oberndorf. At that time, McQanan had voted 
against the executive session and remained outside. 

When Council returned, Heischober said that in view 
of the fact that "additional information of consequence 
was received and heard fran Wright," Qty Council felt 
it should confer with the city attorney. He said the 
Council would like to please everyone but that this was 
not Dossible. ,, 

He said the Council found it "absolutely necessary 
to discuss legal matters with the city attorney and the 
rights, equities and disposition of this coi^rn as well 
as the remedy for the people. He moved to defer the 
item for one week. Council aooroved unanimously. 

Mayor Jones then instructed the two sides to get 
together to work out an amicable agreement in a 
manner acceptable to both parties. 

Baum then unleashed his rebuke. He said it was 
proper to go into executive session for a legal matter. 
He said he had gone through trial by press once (he 
refered to the incident when Council members had 
been charged with meeting secretly in ^Jo^th Carolina. 
He said it was not proper for individual Council 
members to decide something immoral was going on in 
the back room. "Who else would consult lawyers in 
public?" he asked. He said Council did that once in the 
case of Lakeside Construction, to its regret. 

Then he said, "Meyera, you've accused us of 
violating the freedom of information act (in the past)." 
He added she accused the School Board of meeting in 
Williamsburg. Also, in violation of the freedom of 
information act, and one week later expressed 
disappointment that no progress had been made in 
consolidating of services of the School Board and 
Council. He asked whether she actually expected some 
progress after the accusatiwis. 

He said the Council had a murky matter before it no 
matter which way it went. He pointed out that Grover 
Wright's clients don't consult him in public. "What is 
wrwig with going into executive session?" 

Henley replied that she was swry Council had to be 
airing its dirty linens in public. She said she had asked 
the mayor and Council whether there was any new 
information had received no answer. She said this was 
the first time this had occurred and that her actiai in no 
way was passing judgment on the other members who 
attended the meeting. If Council caild not make the 
decision, it caild always defer the matter which 
would give the Council an interim in which to ctmfer, 

she said. 

McCoy said that he fek like Baum, that Council had 
to get with its attorney. "We see a court reporter taking 
every word. ..a couple of members made us look bad..." 

Heischober said that it was too bad that two serious, 
well-thinking members of Council took the positicm they 
did. He said that Council docs not need new evidence or 
infonnation to call an executive session. Then, 
addressing the audience, he said, "You, the citizens, 
are the cmes whose monev is going to pay for the legal 
costs. All we want are the applicant and the citizens to 
be able to spend a little more time to (find a viable 
solution) instead of going into cairt." 

Baum noted that Council discraitinued recording 




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Training From 3 Months To 3 Years 

Smokey Mountain 
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Frank C. Roimuio Ag^-t r'gkt^g^ 
Owner dXraiiier 4ol-0999 



executive sessions because of the legal pr(*lems which 
arose a few year? ago when Council's tapes were 
subpoenaed. He said that the opposition loan executive 
session was the smartest political thing to do. 

He said later that "populism is 85 percent 
demogoguery. It's good politics to take some popular 
action that has no chance of success, he said. 

By trying to please a crowd, you're fooling them and 
fooling yourself. He admitted that "all of us want to 
please a crowd," but that "you can't expect to get 
(legal) advice publicly. 

He said Council made a mess so many times by 
trying to be its own lawyer. 

Oberndorf, who made no comment on her action at 
the meeting, said later that by her action she did not 
mean tocast aspersions on anyone else. If one needs to 
consuh an attorney, she said, the matter can be 
deferred to give Council the c^portunity to explore. She 
said she was not comfwtable with setting a precedent, 
and that the legal aspects had been discussed at an 
executive session before the formal session. The 
Council ran that session a half hour into the formal 
meeting. 

She said she did not believe in going alcmg to get 
along because it would mean giving up her basic 
beliefs. She said it isn't worth it. She said she did not 
hear them say anything new. 



Wright tdd Council that he needed Council to direct 
the staff to process Moore's site plan in accord with the 
zoning regulations. He said that one restriction is 
applicable, requiring a 75-foot buffer strip, because it 
was recorded in the clerk's office in May 1975. 

The property was originally zoned under former 
Princess Anne County ordinances for duplexes and was 
rezoned on Aug. 7, 1972 to multi-family. At that time, a 
use permit also was needed for multi-family construc- 
tiot, and one was granted for 385 units including a 
high-rise structure. The 250-foot and 150-foot setback 
restrictions went with the use permit. However when 
the property was rezoned under the Comprehensive 
Zoning Ordinance (CZO) in 1973. the property was 
rezoned R-9 (roughly nine units per acre) while 
normally property zoned multifamily was zoned A-1, 
Apartment District, under the new CZO, Wright said. 
He said the use permit was never activated and 
expired on Feb. 7, 1974. TTie city officially rescinded 
the use permit on Jan. 18. 1979. Without the use 
permit, Wright maintained, the restrictions also are not 
applicable. Moore wants his new site plan to be 
processed. 

City Planning Director Robert Scott said that about 

50 units were buih in the early '70's on part of the site. 

Wright maintained that the restrictions do not apply 

any longer and the site has to be devel(v«d under the 

R-9 zoning classification. 

Heischober said that the parcial wiginally contained 
43 acres and that Water Oaks was built cm 7'/i acres 
alcmg the beach frwt- 

TcOTi Ackiss, of 2401 Lookout Pdnt, Baylake Pines, 
said the city had installed a pumping station and sewer 
lines in the buffered area. 

Scott said he did not think the property was 
downzcHied as claimed by Wright. He said the R-9 
See EXECUTIVE, Page 11 



■> 



Craitors aiitf pndkCHS •/ VnKIX, (•• cMt 

OFFSET NEIirSP4KilS 
AndCIRClttJiRS 



aMllireiftMn^cM. 



BYERLY niBUMTMNS 



tM 627-5020 



Editorial 

Continued from Page 2 

them might be acceptable. Ideally, 
however, the advertising on them should 
concern only Virginia Beach businesses 
and activities, and not serve as lures from 
other localities to draw the city's residents ~ 
and tourists out of Virginia Beach. 

Through the cooperative efforts ot 
several local legislators, the 1983 General 
Assembly has allocated $2 million for the 
Virginia Museum of Marine Sciences, 
although the funding is conditional. That 
means the city will receive the funds if the 
state has them. 

Nonetheless, the news is a significant 
breakthrough, financially and morally, ^ 
for all those concerned parties who have - 
braved strong winds and high surf in their 
efforts to see the museum become a 
reality. Let's just keep our fingers 
crossed. — G.D.G. 



Gas Up • Fill up with Kerosene 
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



LYNNHAVEN 



Sixty - Six 
801 S. Lynnhaven Rd. 





We Don't 

Want The 

Shirt Off 

Your Back 

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Just 
Good Service 

At 
Great Prices 



I 



Jerry Parker 
Owner 



Transmission • Brak» • Tune up 
• Gmextl ReiMurs • 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 



Business, Real Estate ft Finance 



The Builders 
Block 

^DMgHkluBaa 



The BiMcn Hock wM 
be a fcatwc UgMiiiiltai 
■ew coattractioB ia 
Virgiaia Beack mm4 
Ckcsi^cake. 



A Timely 
Development 




With the F A M BuiUint due to open soon, the 
groundbreaking for Loehmann's FUiza, and the 
proposed library site near by. many are viewing the 
centrally located Pembroke area as the hub of Yirginia 
Beach. 

But just minutes from there in suburban Larbpur is 
a development wlMise tinK has come. Custom 
toMiihouses bom oi the urban tradition «nd set in an 
atmosplwre of tranquility. Hiese are antiqued brick 
units with bay windows, large inviting foyera with 
curving staircases, extensive crown molding, shadow 
bcBdng, cluir railing, generous use of wallpaper and 
bright sunny rooms. 

There are four modeb, each with two bedrooms, two 
and one half l«ths. and a fireplace (a third bedroom is 
optional). Ibe construction b all brick with mainte 
napce &ee vinyl shutters, double hung windows and 
well insulated waUs, ceilings a|id floors. The units are 
buUt on oawl space, have storage sheds, and are 
protected by the ten year HOW warranty. 

"Efficiency is a coiKem <rf today's buyer which we 
share, so we used ene^y ef^ent appUames toad heat 
pumpt," said Ray Roenker, one (tf three principals who 
make up Dimensions tac. 

Roenker is tht marketing arm and places buyer 
financing, Walter Monahan is the developer and 
arranges construction financing, and Jack Clifton is the 
construction superintendent. 

Dimensions and Tklewater Develofmient Corp., (a 
subsidiary of Atlantic Permanent Savings and Loan 
Association) are the builders of Olde Towne. 
Dimensions has a proven track record in Chesapeake 
Beach. Ha^ood I\«tt, Fairfield Forrest, and Le Cove. 

Hie experience gained at these earlier develop- 
ments is quite evident at ade Towne in the quality of 
constructkn nd attention paid to detul. Oie only 
need^^-walk thrm^y^npreciUMhese differences, 
«^M^Vviously t^^^^mx^h^s than 3 weeks. 
i^ormkmmeawnmnaewaPioki. "Oirgoaiis 
to give oar customers what they want, not whatever we 
can bidU for the dteapest dollar that week," said Ray 
Roenker. With this attitude. Dimensions Inc. can only 
continue to prosper. 



Ann R. Palmateer 

Receives Award For Excellence 



Ann R. Palmateer, 
managing brcAer of Good- 
man Segar Hogan Resi- 
dential Sales Corpora- 
tion's Chesapeake office, 
has been awarded the 
cmnpany's Award for 
ExceUemx. 

A Managing Broker 
since 1980, Palmateer 



revived the Award f(v 
her outstanding manage- 
ment performance during 
1982. 

Palmateer is a Director 
of the Hdewater Board of 
Reakors and Vice Chair- 
person d the Education 
Commfttee ctthe Virginia 
Assodation of Realtors, 
regMn6. 



We Teach The Teachers 

When considering a Real Estate 
School, ask yourself, "Where did 
their instructors get thdr education?" 
The answer, most likely - throu^ 
Surety. 

Evoyone judges Real Estate schools 
on standards we set yeans ago. 
Today, these standards still apply. 
We offer license preparation in just 
sixty days, morning as wdl as evening 
classes at a central location. But 
most importantly, 

WE OFFER RESULTS... 

8S^ of our students !»ss the State 

Exam on their flrst try and our 

Broker Candidates enjoy a 97% passing 

average! 

Come ~ join the winners. 

Sorely, the standard 
of excellence 

Surety 

R^ Estate School 

S737 Princess Anne Road 
Virginia Beach, Va.. 23462 

499-2395 



Sell Or 
Keep? 

By Roger Pylc 




%#> 



M 



3. 



If you own an income property purchased prior to 

1981, now is the time to sell. Why? 

i. Because the new tax laws enacted in 1981 allow far 
better depreciation for pri^crty purchased after 
•December 1980. It would behoove an owner to sell 
his pre '81 property and buy another now and take 
advantage of the increased tax break. The result is a 
better return on the invested dollar which is the 
whde reason for investing. 

2. Spring, historically, is the best time of year to sell. 
More buyers are looking to buy, the property shows 
better, and you will have a better chance of finding a 
prc^tty yourself. It has been my experience that 
the highest prices are paid in the spring and summer 
months. 

There is talk of Concress lessing the aggressive 
depreciation they allowed after 1980 so if you sell 
and buy another property now, you wiU take 
advantage of the grandfather effect because it is 
unlikely that any iww reduction in depreciation 
benefits will be retroactive. 

4. Many owners keep a property too long. TTiey dcn't 
take the time to evaluate their position which should 
be done yearly. They get complacent in the 
comfortable security that their property is operating 
well and don't realize that the return on equity is 
probably stagnating. All too often, emotions seem to 
govern the dicision to sell rather than a rational 
financial decision based on an evaluation of where 
they now stand (present position), wl^ere they want 
to be (goals), when (the ftiture) and what steps they 
have to take to get there (the decision point). 
Usually, the most successfiil real estate investws arc 

those who do not fall in love with their property. They 

are the people who rect^nia that to move ahead, you 

must generate activity, sell every 2 to 5 years and move 

up the ladder. 

Citizens Trust Names 
Barker Campbell & Farley 




MkhadMcNcase 



LalaW.WaU 



Pavilion Tower 
Appoints Managers 



Michael McNease' and 
Lula W. Walsh have joined 
I^vilion Tower, a Dunfey 
Resort A Conference Cen- 
ter, as sales managers. 
The aixouncement has 
been made by Tom Ken- 
ney, director of sales. 

As sales manager for 
associations, McNease is 
responsible for soliciting 
convention business en 
behalf of the hotel, which 
is scheduled to c^n June 
1, 1983. Prior to joining 
Pavilioi Tower, McNease 
was invcrfved in ccMiven- 
tion sales for five years 
with Hdiday hin-Scc^ in 
Norfolk. He also served as 
sales manager for the 
Virginia Beach Sheraton 
and as assistant director 
of sales for the Fort 
Magruder Inn in Wil- 
liamsburg, Virginia. 

Walsh, as sales mana- 
ger for corporate groups, 
is respouible fot generat- 
ing corpcH-ate meetings at 
Pavilion Tower. She was 



associated previously with 
the Omni Intemational 
Hotel in Ncvfolk as cater- 
ing sales manager and has 
several years experience 
in advertising sales. 

McNease and Walsh 
are headquartered at 
Pavilion Tower sales 
office, 1900 Pavilion 
Drive, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 23451, telephone 
804/422-8900. 

The 300-room Pavilion 
Tower, adjacent to Pavi- 
lion, Virginia Beach Con- 
vention Center, will fea- 
ture comprehensive con- 
ference facilities, includ- 
ing a ballroom that will 
seat in excess of 700 
people, nine meeting 
rooms, dining and recrea- 
tional facilities. Pavilion 
Tower is managed by 
Dunfey Hotels of Hamp- 
ton, New Hampshire, 
operators of 28 hotels in 
the United States, London 
and Paris. 



Barker Campbell & Far- 
ley has been named to 
represent Citizens Trust, 
a SlOO million asset bank 

based in Pwibinouth. Vir- 
ginia. Qtizens Trust has 
13 offices throughout the 
Tidewater area. Barker 
Campbell & Farley is a 



three year old, $6 million 
agency headquartered in 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
Executive v'vx president 
Palmer Farley of Barker 
Campbell & Farley ^and 
vice president Peyton 
Bowden. representing 
Citizens Trust, made the- 
announcement. • 



Lawrence Recognized As 
Outstanding Young Man 



, Lewis Lawrence, was 
r^ently recognized as one 
df Virginia's Five Out- 
standing Young Men by 
the> Virginia Jaycees. The 



awards banquet took - 
place in the Washington 
D.C. area during the 
weekend of the great 
snowstorm. 




OLDE 



TOWNE 



A Custom Townhouse Community in 

the Urban Tradition. We offer 

exceptional quality at 

affordable prices 




OtRECTIONS E«if tram Itpr—tmtt - 
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Home 
460-1610 



Model 
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Outstanding Salesman 
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Saksraan of the Moadi 

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FREOHABrr 

AiMcteieBrAff 

$105,000 in Sales VolaiM 



DENNIS REGISTER 

AMOortc Broker 
SlU^NOtaSdcfVoNiiM 



We congratulate these top professionals 

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M TIM Itoflff Of WMCt 9ltUf0 







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A PIVISION OF COLONIAL SEJtVKX COKPOKATION 



OAtiantic Paniaiiatf Moitgage CcpnpBQr 

A WboUy Owned Subsidiary of Atlantic Peraua^ Federal 
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Phone (804) 623-3753 



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•yxe 



genc^ 



AW* BK»» 0» COlAfNIAL SMtVKE COtMXATm) 

141 Virginia Be^h Blvd. We« 

Nc»fc^. Virginia 23510 

TeM>hoiie: («04) 623-383 1 



Housing Affordability 
Index 



The hfational Associa- 
tion tA Realtors is issuing 
its first monthly Housing 
Affordability Index today. 
The index is designed to 
show the relationship 
between median family 
income and the income 
iKeded to qualify foe the 
purchase of an existing 
single-family home. 

For example, a Housing 
Affordability bidex of 83 
would mean that a family 
earning the median in- 
come is making 83 percent 
fA what is needed to 
qualify for the purchase of 
a median-priced existing 
home with prevailing 
mortgage terms. 

Conversely, an Afford- 
ability Index of 154 would 
mean that a family wan- 
ing the medi^i_Jjicomi 
has more ttdm enough 
income to qualify for the 
purchase of a median- 
priced home. An Afforda- 
bility Index of 100 would 
mean that the median 



family oncome in the 
naticxi is just enough to 
qualify for the median- 
priced existing home. 

hi conjunction with the 
Affordability Index, the 
National Association of 
RealtM's provides monthly 
data on the median sales 
price of an existing hoaw, 
the average mortgage rate 
on loans closed, the 
average monthly pay- 
ment, median family 
income, the percentage of 
income requried for mort- 
gage payments and the 
income necessary to quali- 
fy for the median-priced 
home. 

The qualifying oncome 
is based on the prevailing 
mortgage loan require- 
ments of the Federal 
Home Loan Mortgage 
Corp. and the Feckral 
ge Asso- 
ciaticxi. «■ ' 

The monthly Afforda- 
bility Index release will 
include current as well as 
histcrical data. 




You're Bright. 

Ambitious & Successful. 
So why are you bored? 



'.,1.' 




Most joM acs iUke this: you start like ti house on 

first, learn all mere is to know, then you end -up 

doing the same thing day after day after day. 

When you work with CENTURY 21* METRO, 

no one sets limits on your growth; you earn as 

much as you're worth at your own pace. 

Call us about our scholarship programs and our 

extoisive real estate training. 

For a brighter future, join CENTURY 21» 

METRO. You'll never be bored. You have our 

word on that. 

We will DOUBLE 
OUR SIZE IN 1983 

METRO REALTY 

420-2000 

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Chesapeake, VA 23320 

COME GHO V WITH US! 




Ao Offei^g By Rhodes Realty, Ltd. 

iLEOAKS 

A Developnent of Dbtinction 
Parris Burbage, Builder 



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$63,400 

to 
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V iroinia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 9 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



Realtors Issue First Housing Index 



Lower mongage inter- 
est rates, relatively stable 
home prices and rising 
family incane combined 
to make housing more 
affordable in January, 
according to the National 
Association of Realtors. 

In the first moithly 
report of its newest statis- 
tical series, the Housing 
Affordability Index, the 
Association study showed 
that the January index 
was 78.9 percent ~ a 1.1 
percentage point im- 
provement from £)ecem- 
ber's index. 

"The January index _ 
means that a family earn-' 
ing $2?,917, the median 
U.S. income, had 78.9 
percent of the income 
necessary- to qualify for 
the purchase of a median- 
priced home, which was 
$68,300 in January," ex- 
plained Dr. Jack Carlscm, 
chief economist and 
executive vice president 
of the Association. 

Historical data indicat- 



ed that the Uut time the 
Housing Affordability 
Index was 100 ~ meaning 
the median family income 
was exactly what was 
needed to qualify for the 
median-priced home - 
was in February 1979. TTie 
index has been below 100 
ever since. 

"While the afibrdabU- 
ity picture is still less than 
bright, January repre- 
sents the eighth consecu- 
tive month of improve- 
ment from the low of 64.2 
recorded in May 1982," 
Carlson said. 

The improved afforda- 
bility picture was reflect- 
ed in the record monthly 
increase in existing -home 
sales reported by the 
Association last week, 
Carlson noted. On a sea- 
sonally adjusted annual 
basis, home resales in 
January rose to 2.61 mil- 
lion units from 2.26 mil- 
lion in December. The 
percentage increase was 
the biggest in the 16 years 
the Association has been 



compiling the monthly 
sales data. 

"Qearly, steadily fall- 
ing mortgage interest 
rates have played the lar- 
gest role in improving 
housing affordability (^er 
the last eight months," 
the economist noted. 

The average imcrest 
rate on institutional mort- 
gages closed in January 
fell again to 13.64 percent 
- down from 13.98 per- 
cent in December and 
significantly lower than 
the 16.11 perwnt rate 
reported eight months 
earlier. 

However, rising incane 
and relatively flat home 
prices also contributed to 
improving affordability, 
Carlson jioted. 

The annual income 
necessary to qualify far a 
median-priced h«ne in 
January was $30,330 - 
down $340 from Decem- 
ber and $4,912 less than 
the necessary qualifying 
income last May. 

The percentage of med- 



ian family intome neces- 
sary to make mortgage 
payments on a median- 
priced home fell in Janu- 
ary to 31.7 percent -- the 
lowest level since October 
1980. 

Despite the gap be- 
tween median family 
income and qualifying 
income for the median- 
priced home, housing 
sales, of course, have 
increased in recent 
months, Carlson noted. 

"There are sane obvi- 
ous reasons: for example, 
half the families in the 
country make m<xe than 
the median incone and 
many homes are priced at 
less than the median," he 
said. "Also, such devices 
as seller financing are 
enabling many home- 
buyers to obtain more 
affordable mortgage rates 
than those offered by 
lending institutions, 
which are the rates used 
in calculating the Housing 
Affordability Index." 

However, Carlson 
noted, if institutional 



mortgage rates are to 
decline to levels that will 
permit a sustained and 
steadily strengthening 
housing recovery, it is 
essential that Congress 
and the administration 
solve the federal deficit 
crisis. 
"As long as the threat of 

government borrowing 
requirements in the $200 
billion range hangs over 
the private capital mar- 
kets, interest rates will be 
prevented from falling to 
the historic 3Vi percent- 
age pdnts above the infla- 
tion rate. 

"Based on the experi- 
ence of the past 30 years, 
mortgage interest rates 
should be 8'/^ percent," 
he said. "And if that were 
the case, the Housing 
AffordabiUty Index right 
now would be $118.6." 

The National Associa- 
tion of Realtors, the na- 
tion's largest trade associ- 
aticHi, represents more 
than 600,000 individuals 
involved in all phases of 
the real estate industry. 



Housing 

Affordability 

Index 




Much 



1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 

1982 

Jan. 

Feb. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

1983 
Jan. 



Median- Mori- 
Priced gage 
Exist. Hm . Rate 



$42,900 
48.700 
55,700 
62.200 
66,400 



66,400 
66,900 
67.000 
67,100 
67.8('0 
69,400 
69,200 
68,900 
67,300 
66.900 
67,700 
67,500 



9.02% 

9.58 

10.92 

12.95 

15.12 



15.92 
15.73 
15.65 
16.00 
16.11 
15.56 
15.52 
15.59 
15.27 
14.95 
M.29 
13.95 



Monthly 
Payment 

$277 
330 
422 
549 
677 



711 
70S 
706 

722 
734 
727 
723 
723 
692 
675 
654 
638 



Payment 

as ft 
Income 

20.7% 

22.4 

25.7 

31.3 

36.3 



37.9 
37.6 
37.2 
37.f 
38.3 
37.8 
37.4 
37.2 
35.4 
34.4 
33.1 
32.2 



Median 
Family 
income 

$16,010 
17,640 
19,680 
21,023 
22,388 



22,506 
22,623 
22,741 
22.839 
22,976 
23,094 
23.212 
23,329 
23.447 
23.565 
23.682 
23.800 



Quali- 

ftrini 

Income 

$13,279 
15,834 
20,240 
26.328 
32,483 



34,124 
33,988 
33.873 
34,630 
33,242 
34,893 
34,707 
34,706 
33,236 
32,380 
31,401 
30,609 



Afford- 
ability 
Index 

120.6 
1II.4 
97.2 
79.9 
68.9 



66.0 
66.6 
67.1 
66.0 
6S.2 
66.2 
66.9 
67.2 
70.3 
72.8 
73.4 
77.8 



68,300 13.64 



632 



31.7 



23,917 30.330 71.9 



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10 Virginia Beach Sun, March 9. 1983 

s 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



Multifamily Housing 



Government Should Encourage Private Sector Investment 



The Government should 
play an active roie in 
stimulating private sector 
investment in multifamUy 
housing that docs not 
qualify for low and mockst 



income subsidies, accord- 
ing to Alan V. Davies, 
CF^, 1983 president erf 
the Institute of Real 
Estate Management. 
Davies, who heads J. 



Qarence Davies Realty 
Co., Inc., ^4ew York, New 
York, states "the current 
economic situation in tMs 
country has created a 
crisis concerning the 



afTordability (rf housing - 
both single £EunUy homes, 
and, more importantly, in 
multifamily residences. 
•Ten or fifteen yean ago, 
many apartment progeos 



were financed at interest 
rates (rf7% to 8%, usmg 
tnllooa mortgages wk^ 
ai« iKW oxung diK. 
These developments were 
pm&ated on the presun^)- 



tim that refinancing 
would be possible at 
reasonabte rates of inter- 
est and that cash flows 
woukl be increased signif- 
icantly." 



Fourth Major Acquistion 



Goodman Segar Hogan Acquires Riley & Assoc, Inc. 



Goodman Segar ttogan 
Residential Sales Corpo- 
ration recently announced 
its acquisition of Riley and 
Associates Realtors, 
effective April 1, 1983 
according to a joint 



announcement by Good- 
man Segar Hogan Execu- 
tive Vice President, Jack 
Pdpe and Riley President, 
Cathy Riley. 

Riley is the fourth real 
estate firm Goodman 



Life Federal & Chesapeake 
S&L Merges 



Life Federal Savings 
and Loan and Chesapeake 
Saving and Loan, both 
headquartered in Norfoiic, 
merged earlier this year. 

The merger was first 
approved by the Federal 
Home Loan Bank in 
Washingtai, D.C. 

Chesapeake's S150 mil- 
lion in assets and Life 
F«*<1eral'"! 1^350 million in 



assets create Life Federal 
Savings and Loan Associ- 
atkxi. 

Chesapeake Savings 
and Loan was founded in 
189S, and Life Federal 
Savings and Loan was 
organized in 1935. 

The new organizaticn 
operates 19 branch offi- 
ces. 



Segar Itogan has acquir- 
ed. The John Wright 
Realty Co. in Vuginia 
Beadi was acquired in 
1980. In 1982, the real 
esute firm Centuiy-21 
Commonwealth in New- 
port News joined the GSH 
organization .«nd Good- 
man Segar liogan also 
acquired the residential 
business of Pembroke 
Realty. Inc. 

The recent acquisition 
(rf Riley, a 30 associate 
company, is yet another 
step in Goodman Segar 
Hogan's expansion plan 
for t|ie future. 

"The real estate indus- 
try is growing and chang- 
ing. It's a much more 
complex business than it 



was 10 years ago," said 
Pope. 



"Because today's buy- 
ers and sellers require 
more, a real estate com- 
pany has to be ready to 
Ailfill those needs. This 
takes strong oiganizatkn 
and good', c<»nmitted 
peo|^, Uke the Rj^-Aso- 
ciates." 

Recent measures were 
taken by Goodman Segar 
Hksgan to msure a strong 
organization. Several of 
iu top management team 
and senior managing bro- 
kers were promoted to the 
positions of >ice ivesi- 
dents. 

In addition, the com- 



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Claytor On 
VNB's Board 

Robert B. Claytor. 
chairman and chief 
executive officer of Nor- 
folk Southern Cor- 
poration, was elected to 
the board of direct<»rs of 
Virginia National Bank- 
shares, Inc. and Virginia 
National Bank. 

Claytor serves on the 
board of directors of 
Piedmont Aviation,^ 
Richarson-Wayland Elec- the Virginia Opera 
trie Company and the Association, the Roanoke 




"But at current interest 
rates." Davies emphasi- 
zes, "it is virtually impos- 
sible to renegotiate these 
mortgages and make 
these projccu work - 
despite the recent down- 
ward trend in interest 
rates. Although precise 
figures are not available 
on the dollar amount oX 
these outstanding ioands. 
the Naticmal Association 
of Home Builders recently 
estimated the figure at 
between $15 and 30 bil- 
lion, or KHSito^)^ of all 
multifamily uniu in the 
country." 

According to Davies, 
"As renters continue to 
pay a higher percentage 
of their income ipr hous- 
ing multifamily construc- 
tion must be fianced with 
long-term fixed-rate mort- 
gages in order fot these 
projects to be viable. TTie 
current problem, how- 
ever, is that fixed rated 
mortgages are available 
only from the nwiprivate 
sector and rarely to hous- 
ing that was privately 
financed." 

Although I>avies does 
not suggest that the Gov- 
ernment take over the job 
of private financing 



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sources, he believes that 
Government stimulatioi 
of the private sector to 
invest in multifamily 
housing is crucial. He 
concurs with the recom- 
mendations of a study 
conducted by the Institute 
of Real Estate Manage- 
ment in co<veratiOT with 
the National Association 
of Realtors. The reoMn- 
mendations directed to 
the U.S. Department of 
(tousing and Urban De- 
velopment and the Presi- 
dent's Commission of 
Housing include: 

•Reduce and stabilize 
mortgage interest rates 

•Increase and stabilize 
availability of mortgage 
funds. 

•Establish tax incen- 
th'es for i^nor^a^ inves- 
tors. 

•Reinstate interest and 
tax deductions incurred 
during the construction 
period in that some per- 
iod. 

•Encourage the active 
participation of seccmdary 
mortgage marlKt agen- 
cies in the mortgbage 
market. 

•Eliminate rent coitrds 
and prevent the threat 
thereof. 



CFB Promotions 



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ministration offic^ and , 



Barbara S. Leighton and '"^ 
Priscilla A. Busching to 
operations officer. G. 

Harden Barnett, Jr. 
joined the staff as a com- , 
mercial loan officer and 

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Virginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 1 1 



Virsinia Beach Sun News 



Executive Session 

Continued from Pace 7 
zoning classification was selected because it most 
closely approximated a density of 350 f(x the prc^rty. 

Jack H. Stewart, an engineer who lives in the area, 
asked why the residents would agree to have zcming 
changed ftota duplex to a higher density unless they 
got something in return. He said that what they got was 
protection fron the higher density by means of 
setbacks and buffers. 

The setbacks, he said were not tied in with the 
highrise develc^ment but as protecticai fron the 
density. He said the people felt at the time that they 
had made a contract with the develqjer. Mon^e did not 
own the property at the time. 

James W. Hayes, of BaylalK Road, said the 
conmunity negotiated with the developer far many 
months. 

Charles Thomoson. of Shadv Oaks Drive, in 
representing the Ocean ParkGvic League, said that his 
league voted with Baylake Pines. He said the conditions 
were put in because of the higher density zoning. He 
said that ten of the acres in question front the existing 
Water Oaks residents. He said that the SO homeowners 
there had obtained an agreement m 1979 with the 
landowner of the undeveloped parcel that nothing 
would be built on the ten acres on the bay for 50 years. 
He said the intent of the agreement was to retain access 
to the beach for the people who bought prc^erty with a 
waterfrait view. 

Heischobcr nrted that with ten acres of the 35.5 acres 
invdved facing the beach, cnly 25.5 acres were located 
behind the existing units. 

Residents say that since the ten acres is on the 
primary dunes, the owner would not be permitted to 
build there. Their concern was that the land would be 
figured in with the remaining acreage allowing more 
units on the remaining parcel. 

Council Summary 

Continued from Page 7 
Park area, Bayside Borough ("Water Oaks") Deferred one 
week 9-0. 

ir New Business 

Waiver 

Attorney Grover Wright, representing Charles Bowden, 
asked Council to waive requirements to run city water lines into 
a four-lot subdivision in Thoroughgood. Deferred one week 9- 
0. 

Libr«H*y 

Postponed hearing on Public Library information for two 
weeks 9-0. 

Council heard requests from Old World School to expedite 
hearing oii a conditional •use permitr A pp t oveU 9-0. 



Council continued executive session started before legulai 
Council meeting. 




New Road 



Design Plans Approved 
For Great Neck Project 



Design plans for the 
improvement of Great 
Neck Road in the Gty of 
Virginia Beach have been 
approved by the State 
Highway and Transporta- 
tion Commission. 

The project, 2.2 miles 
long, would extend from 
Shorehaven Drive along 
the existing roadway to 
the intersection with 
Thomas Bishop Lane. 
From that point, the new 
road would curve easterly 
from the existing road and 
be constructed on new 
location parallel to, and 
east of. Great Neck Road 
to the northern end of the 
project at its intersection 
with Shore Drive (US 60). 

The roadway from 
Shorehaven Drive to the 
bridges over Long Creek 
and Long Creek Canal 
would have four lanes, 
two f« each direction of 
travel, separated by a 
40-foot-wide raised 
median. The median 
would provide space for 
two additional lanes if 
needed later. 

Also, left-turn lanes 
would be buih at the 
intersecting streets, and 



liurb and gutter would be 
installed on both sides. 

Twin bridges will carry 
two lanes each over Long 
Creek and Long Creek 
Canal. The structures will 
be about 1,200 feet long 
and have 36 feet of verti- 
cal clearance over both 
channels. The bridge 
design will permit future, 
if needed, widening for an 
additi(»ial lane. 

A five-foot-wide side- 
walk would be constructed 
on the west side of the 
roadway imd the western 
bridge, with a combina- 
tion sideWalk-bikeway on 
the east side. 

At the intersection of 
the improved Great Neck 
Road with Shore Drive, 
about 600 feet of the new 
roadway and 1 ,200 feet of 
Shore Drive would be 
built for six lanes of 
travel, three in each direc- 
tion, plus turn lanes, to 
accommodate the large 
volume of turning traffic. 

During the public hear- 
ing, a number of speakers 
suggested several modifi- 
cations of the plans. Engi- 
neers of the Virginia 
Department of Highways 




and Transportation 
recommended the f(41ow- 
ing modifications, which 
were approved by the 
commission: bridge design 
to incorporate the lowest 
feasible structure 
elevation to maintain a 
minimum of 36 feet of 
vertical clearance over 
Long Creek and Long 
Creek Canal. 

•Additional connection 
between existing Great 
Neck Road and the new 
roadway in the general 
area of an extension to 
Lynnhaven Chive. 

•Location of a suitable 
area other than wqodlands 
for the mitigatiai of wet- 
lands. 

The Qty Council of 
Virginia Beach adopted a 
resolution endorsing the 
project at its February 
meeting. 

The project has an 
estimated cost of Si 6. 5 
milli<^. The cost will be 
shared with 75 per cent in 
federal funds. 20 per cent 
state funds, and 5 per cent 
city funds. Qmstruction is 
scheduled for the first 
part (rf 1984. 



Bodybuilders 
To Compete 

Carole Sai^nt, a 22 year-old from 
Virginia Beach, will be one of nuiny body- 
builders competing at "The Mr. and Mrs. 
Virginia Beach Bodyb uilding Contest" on 
» .lVfiifch'l2 at Iht Deep Creek Hig^ School. 



On Curriculum Assessment 



Brickell Addresses Jersey Group 



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Council 

Okays 

Bonds 

Virginia Beach City 
Council has approved the 
issuance of approximately 
$22 million in industrial 
development revenue 
bonds to nine firms. 

Recent changes in the 
law require Council to 
endorse the bonds on 
recommendation of the 
Industrial Development 
Authority. Previously, the 
Authc^ity had the final 
authOTity to issue the 
bonds. 



Virginia Beach Public 
Schools Sopcrintendeftt 
Dr. E.E. Brickell I'e6ently 
spoke to a forum session 
of the American Associa- 
tion of School Administra- 
tors convention in Atlantic 
City, New Jersey. His 
topic, "Schools for the 
Future," dealt with the 
Qirriculum Assessment 
and Devel(H)ment project 
that has been underway in 
Virginia Beach for nearly 
two years. 

Although the session 
was scheduled on the final 
day of the four-day con- 
vention and at the same 
time as a number of other 
sessions, between 22S and 
250 superintendents and 
other top schod admini- 
strators from around the 
country attended. More 
than half of those who 



attended asked for more 
infortnation ax the projea 
follbwlng Brickell's pre- 
sentatim. A superinten- 
dent from a large mid- 
western school system 
asked that he be allowed 
to visit Virginia Beach 
schods to view the project 
firsthand. 

Brickell said, "I con- 
tinue to be amazed at the 
number of people from all 
over the comtry who want 
to know something more 
about our project. I'm not 
sure how they know about 
it, but I am glad they do." 

The session where 
Brickell spoke was moder- 
ated by Charles S. Terrell, 
Jr., superintendent, San 
Bernardino County 
Schods, Califo-nia. Also 
on the program was Ken- 
neth W. CHsen, superin- 



tendent, WheatOT, 
nois, PubUc Schools. 



mi- 



Brickell and members 
of the Qirriculum Assess- 
ment and Development 
Team have made presen- 
tations on the project to a 
number of regional and 
national educational 
organizations in recent 
months; several other pre- 
sentations are scheduled 
into this summer. 

The final report of the 
Curriculum Assessment 
and Development task 
force, containing the 
recommendations f(x the 
future curriculum in Vir- 
ginia Bleach schools, will 
be delivered to Brickell on 
March 10; Brickell will 
present recommendations 
to the Schod Board in 
AprU. 



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P.A. Grad On Who's Who 



Elizabeth Anne Wilkin- 
son, daughter of The Rev. 
and Mrs. Byron R. 
Wilkinson of Virginia 
Beach, has been named to 
the dean's list for the fall 



semester, 1982. at Ran- 
dolph-Macon Woman's 
College. A freshman at R- 
MWC, Wilkinson is a 
graduate of Princess Anne 
High School. 



Seniors' Save 

Sun Subscription Discount 
For Beach Senior Citizens 




Virginia Batch Sun subw^ptions for 
Virginia Beach residenu 60 years or older 
may be purchased for $6 for one year, or 
$9 for two years. A regular one-year sub- 
scription is $9; two years is $12. To sub- 
scribe to The Virginia Beach Sun, Virginia 
Beach's community newspaper for 57 
y«rs, «ai 486-34M or mail check to The 
Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. Rosemont 
Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Danley 



Seniors 
Presented 
DAR Awards 

The Adam Thorough- 
good Chapter, Daughters 
of the American Revolu- 
tion, recently presented 
Good Citizen Awards of 
1982-83 to three outstand- 
ing Virginia Beach High 
School seniors. 

The awards, (a Good 
Citizens Ccrtificace and a 
Good Citizens pin) were 
presented to the students 
by Mrs. Milton Thorpe, 
Regent of the Adam Tho- 
roughgood Chapter. 

The Good Citizens 
award has been presented 
by the various DAR chap- 
ters in all 50 states since 
1934. The award stresses 
the qualities of Good Citi- 
zens of the U.S.A. They 
must exemplify the quali- 
fications of Leadership- 
which includes personal- 
ity, self-craitrol, ability to 
assume responsibility; 
Dependability-which 
includes truthfulness, 
loyalty, punctuality; Ser- 
vice--which includes 
cooperation, courtesy, 
consideration of others; 
and Patriotism-meaning, 
unselfish interest in 
family, school, commun- 
ity, and nation. All of 
these need to be exhibited 
to an outstanding degree. 
The students are also 
required to fill out an 
extensive questionaire, 
plus they must write an 
essay. 

The Good Citizens are 
then judged on a district, 
state, divisional, and 
national level. The winner 
ofstate receives a $100.00 
educational award; divi- 
sion receives $250.; 
national receives, 3rd 
place, $500., 2nd place. 
$750., and 1st place re- 
ceives $1000. There were 
a total of 10,025 Good 
Citizen awards presented 
in 1982 in the 50 states. 

The three Virginia 
§tudents who were select- 
ed, are: 

Una Danley of Princess 
Anne High School. Lana is 
currently President of the 
Senior class, the co- 
captain of the cheering 
society, Spanish National 
Honor Society, Keyettes, 
and Trinity. Her plans 
include furthering her 
educaticxi at James Madi- 
s(Mi University. 

John HmtMhy DeWlnk- 
kr of Cape Henry CoUcgi- 
ale. John is Oiairman of 
his schods Honor Court, 
which is a student judicial 
body. He is a charter 
member of the Henricus 
Collegium Chapter of the 
National Honor Society, 
and has been accepted as 
an Early Decision Candi 
date for the Cdlege ol 
William and Mary. 

Colleen Dttgan of Coi 
High Schod. Colleen k 
currently serving as Presi- 
dent of the Student Coop- 
erative Association. She is 
copy-editor of the Schod's 
yearbook and a member Of 
the National Haior Soci- 
ety. The Virginia Beach 
C^mist Qub recently 
honored Colleen with 
their Youth CitizenshiJ) 
Award for service to tl^ 
community. She is ah 
active member of tl^ 
French Qub, Key Chilj, 
and Fc»ensics. \ 

Accompanying tiM stil- 
dents to the awards lunclf 
eoo, were, Mrs. Russejl 
[Janley, mother of Lan^ 
Dr. and Mrs. Edwari^ 
Haskell, parents of Johh 
DeWinkler; and MrsJ. 
Slade Dugan mother df 
Colleen. Mrs. Betty 
Hermann, Ch«rm«n olf 
the DAR Good CitiKitt 
Committee was Pesponsi- 
ble for the cotwfflnation (f 
awards and students 



wmm 



i« 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 




The Woman's View 



Remodeling The Kitchen 



Kitchens remain one of 
the most popular 
remodeling projects in the 
home improvement field. 
An estimated 2.3 million 
Icitchens are expected to be 
remodeled or installed in 
1983, according to the 
National Kitchen Cabinet 
Association. Perhaps 
yours is one. 

In terms of spending, 
more than $5 billion will 
go towards kitchen 
remodeling this year 
alone. 

There are a number of 
reasons why kitchen 
remodeling remains so 
popular. 

First, the average 
homeowner tends to 
remodel his kitchen every 
15 years. As the number 



of existing homes grows 
older, more and more kit- 
chens become prime can- 
didates for moder- 
nization. Add to this the 
economic conditions of 
the last couple years-high 
interest rates, inflationand 
interest rates, inflation 
and tight mortgage 
monies- and its easy to see 
why more and more 
homeowners are Im- 
proving rather than 
moving. 

Remodeling Popular 

Changing lifestyles and 
new trends have also con- 
tributed greatly to the 
popularity of remodeling. 
Today's working couple, 
for example, may want a 
kitchen with enough work 
space for two, plus the 



latest in energy-efficient, 
time-saving appliances. 
The single homeowner, on 
the other hand, may want 
the same time-saving ap- 
pliances, but a kitchen 
that is compact, organized 
and easy to maintain as 
well. For households with 
a growing family, incor- 
porating the kitchen into a 
"great room" may be the 
ideal. Great rooms are like 
having a living room, kit- 
chen and dining all in one. 
Think Storage 
Regardless of what 
course your remodeling 
plans take, one thing is 
essential - provide 
adequate storage. If new 
cabinets are in order, con- 
sider units that feature 
built-in organizers. Such 
features as lazy susans. 



adjustable and pull out 
shelves, partitioned lid 
and cutlery drawers and 
vegetable bins will not 
only provide a place for 
everything, but make it 
easier to keep everything 
in place. 

Since the kitchen is rnie 
of the busiest rooms in the 
house, remember to select 
cabinets that are not oiriy 
attractive, but durable. To 
be sure the cabinets you 
select will be able to 
withstand hard daily use. 
overloaded shelves and 
drawers, hard pulls on the 
doors of wall hung 
cabinets and resist staining 
from a variety of spills, 
look for the certification 
seal of the National Kit- 
chen Cabinet Association. 





The Art Of 
Scribbling 



The scribblers. 

They just can't help 
themselves, according to 
Growing Child, the 
m<mthly child develop- 
ment newsletter. 

:;They've just got to close 
t6eir fists around those fat 
b^ic crayons-and $&Sy-^ 
Me. Around and around 
t^ey go, in huge arcs, 
a^ular zig-zigs, blurs, 
aid blobs. Unfotunately, 
scribblers like to use walls 
for their canvases. 

(U you provide an alter- 
native for a scribbler, like 
a large chalkboard and 
c(4ored chalk, an easel 
with newspaper and 
paint, or lots of plain 
paper (the back of com- 
puter printouts or shelf 
paper in rc^ls make mar- . 



vellous drawing pads) 
you'll have fewer pictures 
on your walls.) 

Scribbling may look like 
ncmsense to adults but 
there is some sense in it 
for a three-year-old. 

Wheif^ttdren learn, to 
-"9«dp thejf-ann movements ■ 
in time, those big circles 
become faces. Tight 
round scribbles makes 
eyes, looser ones make 
curly hair. 

Sweeping lines stop 
short fOT arms, fingers, 
mouths, spiky hair. Point- 
ing with the point of the 
craycai, when it becomes 
less violent, makes pretty 
dots of snow and gentle 
raindrops. Scribbling is 
necessary preparation for 
drawing -and writing, too. 



-ANNOUNCEMENTS 



But it's hard to know 
what to say to a youngster 
when you're presented 
with a work of art. 
"That's very nice" 
sounds as phony as it is. 
"What is it?" is embar- 
rasing since the child 
probably doesn't knpw 
either. 

"1 really like purple 
scribbles" is probably the 
most honest, apprecia- 
rive, and gracious thing 
you can say! 

For more information 
about the physical and 
social development of 
children up to the age of 
six, write to Growing 
Child, P.O. Box 620N, 
Ufayette, IN 47902. In- 
clude chtld's birthdate 
when writing. A year's 
subscription to the news- 
letter costs $11.95. 



Southside Business and 

Professional Women's 

Club of Chesapeake, V A 

The Southside 

riisiness and 

Professional Women's 
Club of Chesapeake will 
hold their March 
meeting on the 14th star- 
ting at 7p.m. 

The meeting will be 
held at Nick's Steak 
House, 1125 S. Military 
Hwy., Chesapeake. 

The guest speaker will 
be Ms. Janice Smith, 
Social Worker, Sexual 
Trauma Team with the 
Chesapeake Social Ser- 
vices. 

All members are urges 
to attend, and visitors 
and guests are 
welc»fl|ed. i.P-/ ► 

®p^j^furt,h^i ''infor- 
mation, contact Barbara 
Huetttg, 547-8121; Ext. 
1100. 



Great Bridge Elementary 

Great Bridge Elemen- 
tary School PTA will 
have its March meeting 
at 7:30onthe 15thinthe 
school auditorium. The 
second grade students 
will present the program. 
The executive committee 
will meet at 6:30 in the 
library. 



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G.A. Treakie 
Elementary School 

The monthly meeting 
of the G.A. Treakie 
Elementary School 
P.T.A. will be held 
Monday - March 14th at 
7:30 p.m. in the school 
cafterioum. The 

program is titled - 
Physical Education -- 
Spring Into Good 
Health. Come and sup- 
port your child and 

erhnnl 



Woman's View Editor 
Vacationing 

Pat Beasley, editor of 
Woman's View, is 
currently vacationing in 
sunny Florida. The 
production staff here at 
Byerly Publications 
wishes her a happy 
vacation and Hurry 
Home Pat! We miss you 
dearly! In the meantime, 
you can still enjoy Pat's 
column. The Chopping 
Block. 



January 17, 1980, 

Today, as you may re- 
call, is Benjamin Frank 
lin's birthday; and when 
such a figure's birthday 
ciMnes along, I often 
indulge in a commcm exer- 
cise—that of wondering 
what he might have to say 
about the current state of 
affiairs., 

I ran across a quote 
immediately that seemed 
to be perfectly tailored to 
the news, that our ally 
Japan, which owes much 
fA its success as an eco- 
nomic power to us, finds it 
cannot go along with sanc- 
tions against Iran or eco- 
nomic pressure on the 
Soviet UniOTi. 

Franklin's words: those 
who would give up a little 
liberty, for safety, deserve 
neither liberty not safety. 

January 14, 1980. 

The news iron Iran is 
likely to be seomd ot third 



hand and even more con- 
ftjsing in coming days. 

The revolutionary coun- 
cil which heads up the 
chaos in Iran has decreed 
that all American report- 
ers must leave. 

They're biased— the 
American reporters— and 
so Iran is kicking them 
out. 

It seems they failed to 
notice the difference in 
the system employed by 
the Shah and the new 
system put into effect by 
the Ayatollah and his 
mob. 

You see, under the 
Shah, one group ruled the 
other group by repression 
and murder; under the 
Ayatollah, it's just the 
other way around. 



This series of excerpts from 
"Notes To My Friends" is 
brought to you through the cour- 
tesy of The Donning Company, a 
local publishing firm, and Jim 
Kincaid. The book is available in 
most book stores. 



Excessive Exercise 

is too much of a good thing "bad"? Maybe. 

Researchers at the University of Califomia/San 

Francisco School of Medicine note that slender women 

■ v»(ho exercise heavily might be more prtme to "brittle 

ibjane" syndrome— known medically as osteoporosis. = 

I A tough multi-mile running schedule 'or other 

sustained aerobic exercise can lead to an early loss of 

bone mass. 

The key consideration, according to Christopher E. 
Cann, Phd, of USCF's Department of Radiology, is 
premature cessation of menstruatioi (amenorrhea), 
which can be caused by ultra-heavy exercise. 

Medical World News magazine recently reported 
Cann's findings of a study of 25 amenorrheic patients in 
which he examined the relationship of bone loss. 

"What's new from this particular study," Cann told 
Medical World News, "is that women with amenorrhea 
due to exercise are at risk of bwie loss." Two women 
with stress fractures were referred to his group by the 
orthopedic department, and both turned out to be 
mnners. 

Caim notes that amenorrheic w(»nen with little fot, 
such as the athletes in his study, are known to lack 



ncx-mal craicentrations of estrone, the female sex 
harmcme. Loss of estrogen production at menopause is 
accepted as a critical factor in the development of 
osteqsorosis in older women. 

UCSF researchers have no formal data on rtinners 
and other athletes who continue menstruating, but 
Cann sees no serious problem with this group. 

Due to factors others' ihan lost estrogen production, 
osteoptvosis continues as a problem for many American 
women. Lmg-term calcium deficiency, too, is cited by 
experts as a major case of the disease. 

An emphasis cm dieting. 

An emphasis on dieting, which usually mean 
high-caldum, high-calcrie foods are shunned, could 
contribute to osteoporosis, say many medical experts. 
And while estrogen replacement therapy is sometimes 
recommended in serious cases of osteoporosis, increas- 
ed calcium intake through the use of calcium 
supplements is often rec(»nmended. 



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Style Just Right For You! 

Margie Banks Mildred Steele 

Noniia Jefferson Myrtle Vaughan 
Katby Allen Ariene Grifrin 

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We Welcome To Our Staff 
Sharon Sorey and Dawn Snyder 




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Virginia Beach Sun, March 9, 19H\ 



The Woman's View 




The 

Hint 

Man 

By CHUCK FAULKNER 



Daadruff Remover, 
Making Your Own - 

Dissolve a dozen aspirin 
tablets (any brand) in one- 
half cup of warm water. 
Apply to scalp and gently 
massage for fifteen 
minutes. Rinse out 
thoroughly in lukewarm 
water. 

Dccab, Removing • Soak 
a cloth in warm white 
vinegar and place it on the 
decal. Repeat two or three 
times, and then scrape off 
the soaked decal with the 
back of a knife. 

Dents In Wood, 
Removing - If dents are 
not too deep, the best 
thing is to plate a cloth 
(cotton is best) soaked in 
warm white vinegar direc- 
tly over the dent. Leave it 
there for one hour, 
keeping the cloth wet with 
more warm vinegar as it 
dries out. Then, after an 



hour, press the moist cloth 
with a fairly warm iron for 
about three to five 
minutes. The dent should 
disappear. Note: Repeat if 
necessary. 

Deodorant Stalas, 
Iteraoving - Soak the af- 
fected area in warm white 
vinegar for twenty 
minutes. From time to 
time, work the material 
between the fmgers in the 
vinegar. Now, wash in the 
normal way. If the stain 
remains, soak in 
denatured alcohol or 
sponge it with a cotton 
ball for ten minutes. Wash 
in warm, sudsy water. 
Diamond Rings, Cleaning 
- Soak them for twenty 
minutes in white vinegar, 
then rinse and polish. 

Chuck Faulkner U brought lo 
you through the courtesy qf The 
ponnlng ComptByi a local 
publishing firm, and Chuck 
Faulkner. The book is available 
in most book stores. 




The 

Chopping 

Block 

ByPATBEASLEY 



Since this is 'The year of the Rg' as celebrated by 
our Chinese friends, the following recipe sounds really 
delicious: 

Since it feeds a family of 4 or 5, it aUo sounds very 
economical to me. 

Hope you celebrate 'Tlie Year of the Rg' by giving 
this recipe a try. 

•Pig out' and enjoy! 

PorkChops 

CantMiese 

4 to 6 pork chops (about 1 tablespoon corn 

1-i/i pounds) 





Salt and ground 
black pepper 
Va cup vegetable oil 
1 cup chopped onions 
I can (20 ounces) pine- 
apple chunks (drain; 
reserve syrup) 
V* cup dry sherry 



starch 
■/2 teaspoon ground , 

ginger 
3 tablespoons soy 

sauce 
I cup sUced celery 

1 cup thinly sliced 

carrots 

2 to 3 cups hot codced rice 



Season pork chops with sah and pepper. Heat dl in 
large skillet. Add chq^s and brown on each side. 
Remove all but 2 teaspoons fat. Add onions and saute 
lightly. Stir- In pineapple syrup and water to make I V* 
cups. Add sherry. Cover and simmer 30 minutes or 
until chops are tender; Blend cornstarch, ginger, and 
soy sauce. Stir into meat mixture. Cook about 1 minute 
or until slightly thickened. Add celery, carrots, and 
pineapple chunks. Cover and cook until vegetables are 
tender crisp, about 10 minutes. Serve with beds of 
fluffy rice. Makes 4 to 5 servings. 



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The 

Uprooted 

Gourmet 

By J. ROBERT PERSON 



Everywhere you look, there's someone advertising 
that they have the best this or that. From the best 
original "hotdof" to "the best of the west veal 

parmesan". 

But I must say, that when Evelyn Foxe, a 
ontributing factor to Portsmouth's econany whom 
lives in Chesapeake, asked me over to try her Orange & 
Lemon Pudding, I was so impressed. 

Through Long IslamJ, N.Y.. by way of the Black Bass 
Restaurant, Evelyn has held ground to her family 
recipe, since she first set out as a prospective 
entrepemuer in her field. She says, ''this is one of my 
family fevorites". And I can now see why this is true 
today, even with me. 

Onwge A Lemon Pudding 
Eve^ Fmc-Ckesapcake, Va. 
Sugar 1 '/j cups 

Butter • • • -4 tbsp. 

Four .2 tbsp. 

Juice <rf6 Lemons 2 cups 

Rind and juice of20ranges 

Eggs, separate 6 ea. 

Cream 2 cups 

Cream together butter, sugar and flour. Add lemon 
juice and orange juice and rind. Beat egg ydks and fold 
into mixture along with cream. Place into individual 
baking dishes. Put them into a shallow water bath pan 
and bake 33 minutes - 350°. Serve cold with ot without 
whipped topping. 

Flaming Western Style Omiettc 

Eggs 3 ea. 

Onions, diced 2 tbsp. 

Peppers, diced 2 tbsp. 

Ham, diced 2tbsp. 

Butter 2 tbsp. 

Salt pinch 

Pepper, Wack pinch 

Bacon drippings 3 tbsp. 

Swiss cheese, sliced thin 2ea. 

Brandy I tbsp. 

Beat eggs in bowl and save shell on side. Saute 
onions, peppers, and ham in butter over medium heat 
for three minutes. Set aside and drain. Heat a small 
frying pan over medium heat with a little bacwi 
drippings (3 tbsp.) Just before pan staris to smoke, 
pour eggs into pan and spread evenly. Pour cooked 






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vegetable & ham mixture down middle of «iileiie 
Reduce flame down to very low. Fold all edges ot 
OTilette over mixture of vegetables and ham overlapp- 
ing center. Season with salt and pepper, then nip over 
Press gently with a spatula, if yu desire a well dime 
omlette. Season this side also. Just befwe removing 
from pan, lay two slices of swiss cheese on top. Place a 
'/i part of an egg shell on middle of cheese, with cup 
side up. Remove omlette from pan and pour brandy inicH 
shell. Light and serve immediately. This is grcai tor 
late nights and candle lights. 

Baked Crab & Spinach Casserole 

Butter '• 6 ounces 

Flour •(• ••'•'^P- 

Milk I' : cups 

Mayonnaise • ' ' ^ "P 

Melt butter in pan, then add flour stirring loi live 
minutes over medium heat. Add milk and mayoiujaise 
slowly, while stiring caistantly. Owk for five minutes 
after bringing lo a simmer. Do Not Scrape Bottom of 

Salt pmchi 

Pepper pinch[; 

Old Bay Seasoning ' tbsp. 

Sherry • ' ^ 'bsp. 

Crabmeat ' '^^ 

Chopped Drained Spinach .2(10 ox. frozen boxes) ea. 

Breadcrumbs • •-■"? 

, Sourcfeam ' • ^"P 

Add remaining ingredients and mix well; add sherry 
last. Pour into buttered baking dish and bake 25 to 35 
minutes at 325°. Serves 6 to 8 people. 

Praline Cheesecake NoMc Prize 

Graham Cracker Crumbs I dip 

Sugar 3 tbsp. 

Margarine 3 tbsp. (melted) 

Cbmbine all three ingredients and mix well. Press 
into a 9" to 10" pan. Bake 350° far 8 to 10 minutes 

Cream Cheese lVi\b. 

Eggs 3 each 

Flour .2 tbsp. 

Vanilla Flavoring ' I ibsp. 

Peanut Brittle, finely crushed 1 1 up 

Mix cream cheese, sugar, and flour at medium 
speed. Add eggs one at a time, while continuing to mix. 
Add vanilla and '/j cup crushed peanut brittle. Pour 
into pan over baked and cooled graham cracker crust. 
Bake 350° for 45 to 55 minutes. Sprinkle rest of crushed 
peanut brittle over top of cheesecake just after 
removing from oven. Also use a knife to loosen sides of 
cake from pan before cooling. 

Next week we'll discuss a good recipe for veal cutlet 
and someone else will share that very special, "it's my 
favorite", dish. Please, with all recipes sent to Theii' 
Uprooted .Gourmet, include your name, occupation 
address and (or) telephone number. 
I bid you a good day. 



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Beauty 

Salon 

Call 
For Appolnlment 

490-9288 




We have styling choices 

for everyone and for 

all ages! 

Precision ProfcMlonal 
Haircuts Perms 

»5.70 '13.95 Bp 




Open 9-6 Daily 
9 - 9 Thursday 



1734 E. Utile Creek Rd. 
SSS-9093 



S39HiH«opnus 

42S-Mr7 



(507 ANburn I)ri4q 
420-4069 



l73S.LymihiveBPkwj. 4M1E SIkmc Dr. Sill V. Bern li Blvd. 

4«8-(3M 4M-3233 497-97M 

Middy Shopping CBler W»G C^ A*e. ^^j^,^,, U 

No Appoinlmenu 



Come in Al Yoyr Convcniciice 



and llampluii 




497-4759 




Ounce O'Gold 



Proclaims 
The 



**Sale Of Sales" 



on 



Rings & Rings 

14Kt. Gold 

Men &. Ladies Rii^ 
Reg. '3 0. a Gram 

Now Jut '20.00 /GnuB 



(Aay i>««Mc Cm Be 8»kW Of*ff« 

Greenbrier Mall 
Chesapeake 

420-3932 

Virginia Beach 
tltHiillofiWeM 



-. 425-0440 




A Cruise? A Tour? 
A Weekend Get Away? 



Whatever you're planning, 
Cher or Millie at the 

Chesapeake Travel Service 

will help you make 
your dreams come true! 

Wherever your heart desires, 
one of these super-friendly, travel 
professionab cai» take the worry out of 
a vacation. 



Why not caU 4»-THI5 today, or, better 
yet, drop by tM Lhc (M( Drive 
in Chesap^ke. 



COME GROW 
WITH US!!! 

AT "THE DANCE FACTORY" 

MOMS. GET YOUR KIDS OUT OF THOSt 

WINTER BLUES AND IN "THE DANCE 

FACTORY TWIRLERS" 

CLASSES FOR: BEGINNER TO ADVANC L 1) 

TWIRLERS, TRICKS AND STUNTS. AN 

ACTIVE PARADE CORP, AND NET A. 

COMPETITIVE TWIRLING!!! 

AND LADIES! GET A SHAPE TO GO WITH 

THAT SUMMER TAN!! WEDS. AND THURS. 

NIGHTS JAZZERSIZE!!! 

Call Today n 

"THE DANCE FACTORY" 

1141 Seaboard Avenue 
Chesapeake. VA 23325 



Laurie B. Matey 
Baton Instructor 
804-583-2797 

Patrice A. White 
Dance Instructor 
m4-420-4420 




■HI 



mmmam 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 



Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 




Rotarians Name Roche "Outstanding 



>> 



Continued from Page 1 
In 1981, Roche was 
named "Outstanding Fire 
Educator of the Year," 
and to "Outstanding 
Young Women of Ameri- 
ca." 

The Virginia Beach Ro- 
tary Qub, Inc. dates back 
to 1927, and currently has 
90 menbers, according to 
Hugh Barton, the organi- 
zaticm's vice president. 
InternaticNially, the club 
dates back to 1904. Today, 
Rotary has 980.000 mem- 



bers in 127 different coun- 
tries. "We are a men's 
service organization 
fcHinded to bring people 
from all different profes- 
sions together fa- fellow- 
ship and community ser- 
vice," said Barton. 

Other officers of the 
gr(Hip include President 
Richard "Dick" Swope. 
an attorney; Secretary 
Jdtin Fahey, a Russian 
professOT at C»d Dominion 
University and a member 



of the Virginia Beach 
Schod Board; and Trea- 
surer A. James DeBellis, 
director of the Virginia 
Beach Department of 
Economic Develc^jment. 

This is the third year 
the club has selected an 
outstanding municipal 
employee based on n«ni- 
naticMis from the public 
and fellow employees. 

Previous winners have 
been Richard Branich of 



Parks and Recreatioo, and 
Billy Ballou of the Cir- 
cuit Court. Sitting oo this 
year's selection commit- 
tee were J.C. "Jo" 
I>owns,, assistant to the 
administrator at Virginia 
Beach General Hospital; 
Rdbeit E. Fentress, a vice 
president for the Bank of 
Virginia and president of 
the Virginia Beach Oiam- 
ber of Commerce; and R. 
Dawson Taylw, president 
of True Value Home Cen- 
ters of Virginia Beach. 



Master PoUce Of fker Paul L. Lanteigne, on left, is congratulated by Captain Thomas Irving, Commanding Of- 
ficer, Support Bureau. 

— — — Lanteigne Wins Top Honor 



Virginia Beach Master Pdice Officer Paul J. 
Lanteigne has been selected as the Uniform 
Division Support Bureau Officer of the Year for 
1982. He was chosen by a selection board 
comprised of two lieutenants and five sergeants 
fron this Bureau. 

MPO Lanteigne, 29, has been with the Virginia 
Beach Pdice Department since January, 1975. He 
is a graduate of Princess Anne High School and 
hdds a B.A. in Criminology from St. Leo's 
Q^ege. 

Lanteigne has been with the Unif^m Division 
Supp<»-t Bureau since 1976. He has served as a 
K-9 Officer; a representative on the ICAP 
Steering Committee, the Career Develc^ment 



Committee, and the Sdiedule Committee. Officer 
Lanteigne is a Certified Emergency Medical 
Technician with the Tactical Team, an instructor 
in self-defense and sidehandle baton, and a 
Certified Breathalyzer Operator. 

Most recently MPO Lanteigne has worked as a 
Tk-affic Analyst. His efforts in this area have 
resulted in improvements in the Department's 
Selective Engo-cement, Speed Management and 
DUI Programs, as well as improvements in the 
traffic recOTds system. These efforts have 
received recognition state-wide. 

A Certificate of Recognition was recently 
presented to Lanteigne by Captain Thomas, 
Irving, COTimanding Officer of the First Precinct. 




la ■llcndaiKc were Robert Berry, R. Brwbhaw PnHey and Robert Fcniren. 



Neptune King Nominations Now Being Accepted 



Selections Made To All-State Band, Orchestra 



Nominations are now being accepted for King 
Neptune X who will reign over all Neptune Festival 
events in Virginia Beach this fall according to Larry L 
Joyner, Chairman of the 1983 Neptune Festival. 

Two factors are ccmsidered in the selection of King 
Neptune; involvement in community activities and 
leadership in the comunity. King Neptune must also be 



a permanent resident of Virginia Beach. 

All ncminations should be in writing and may be 
maUed to the Neptune Selectioi Committee, >%ginia 
Beach Chamber of Commerce, 4512 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. ,Nominati(xis should include biographical 
information and must be received no later than Friday, 
February 25th. 



Auditions for the Vir* 
ginia All-State Band and 
Orchestra were held 
recently at Virginia Com- 
monwealth University in 
Richmmd. The following 
musicians from F^incess 
Anne High School were 
selected by the judges to 
participate in this year's 
cwicert, which will be 
held on i^ril 10 at Cave 
Spring High Schod in 
Roanoke, Va.: 

Imelda Aycud - 1st 
chair basson; Gaig Stro- 
hecker - 1st chair contra- 
bass clarinet; Ned Camp- 
bell - 3rd chair percus- 
sion; and Tracey Cra-ey - 
7th chair clarinet. 

Also selected in various 
ahernate positiais were: 



Schools 
E.S.C.A.P.E. 

In late February, the 
Virginia Beach Police 
Department's Crime Pre- 
ventiwi Unit in connection 
with the Virginia Beach 
Schod System began a 
new pilot program entitl- 
ed "E.S.C.A.P.E." 
(Elementary Schod Crime 
Awareness Prevention 
and Educaticm). This pilot 
program will be presented 
to fourth grade students 
in five elementary schods 
during the remainder of 
the school year. 

The purpose of the pro- 
gram is to teach children 
positive alternatives in the 
area of victimization and 
criminal involvement. 

A detailed review of the 
E.S.C.A.P.E. Program is 
available by contacting 
Sgt. D.H. Kappers or 
MPO R.C. Pc^ner III, at 
the Virginia Beach Pdice 
Department, Crime Pre- 
vention Unit at 427-4146. 



Gina Bartolotta - mallets) 

Gina Barresi - oboe; and 

LencM-a Jans - string bass; 

The Princess Anne 



Hi^ Schod Concert Band, 
under the direction of Mr. 
Joseph Ligart, will parti- 
cipate in the District II 



Band Festival which will 
be held on March 1 1 an'^ 
12 at Norview High School 
in Norfdk. 



INC. 



THE 

SQUARE YARD 

W£ MEASURE -UP 

HONESTY • QUALITY • DEPENDABILITY 

CARPET • VINYL 

ORIENTAL DESIGN • REMNANTS 

INTERIOR DECORATING 

BRUCE HARDWOOD FLOORS 

WALLCOVERINGS 



1-8 

a 

■B 
-K 
-K 
-fit 
-3 

-a 




RUGS 




•lOO'^'o Nylon Saxony 
$12.95 NOW $9.95 



•Trevira Saxony 
$14.99 NOW $11.00 

• 100% Nylon Twist. 
$10.89 NOW $8.99 

•Ultra Floor Imperial Vinyl 
$24.50 NOW $21. 50 



•Highlight Vinyl 
$12.95 NOW $10.95 

•Florever Vinyl 
$11.50 NOW M0.50 

•Prestige Vinyl 
$21.95 NOW $19.95 



If you want to DRINK 
that's your business ! 




If you want to STOP 
Call; 499-8865 

Private/Confidential 

(phone if tomeone close 
needs help , 



aMElMii 




Vfc^MtolMclilM. 




The Sqnsrf Yard 

4978 Cleveland St. 
Virginia Beach, Va 
Phone 499-9173 



LOVEISNT 

UMITED 

TO HOLIDAYS. 




You don't turn off your 
love with the tree lights 
And birthdays aren't 
the only days to show 
'affection. There are 
365 days in the year 
to love with. And 
to share with. Love 
isn't limited to holi- 
days. And neither 
is long distance. 



") 




Csr^ ws^ ^ T— 8 CoiltillllltJl lblO|riUMl6 



■■■■ 



'P' 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 9. 1983 15 



Ferebee Honored By Council 



VinMa Beach Qiy Qmncg rtetnUy pnttntttl 
a!1T uf^^*^ " '"*"' *9iapm«tit optrmot B wUh 
Pubttc Woria Departm*M/H^lmuy DMsUm. with a 
certificate ofappreciaHm fnselttaim in reeogiiUemJ on 
serving the city fijr 40 yem. 

Ferebee started war/dng-wUt OU CUy of VIrgkUa 
BeaOion Jan. 1, 1943 at 16 yean of age. From 1943 to 
1953 htworl^a with the PiMIc IMUee Department, 

Works Department/SaiamiOH Division. From 1963 to 
1983 Mr. Ferebee has worked for the PiOMc Works 
Departmem/H^hway Division. 

RESQLUTKXviNascoammN 

WHEREAS, the City Council, bang the g0veniii« 
body of the Qty of Virginia Beach, is concerned that 
aty employees be recognized for their achievements in 
varius facets of emplc^roent and for their contribution 
of time, talent and effort; 

WHEREAS, in the course of our lives, there are 
perscMis who attain fame and great wealth for the 
service they render their fcllowmen. Yet, there are 
many who render such services at great personal 
sacrifice who are quiet and unassuming in their mode (rf 
life and place more value on the comfort and well being 
of ahers than on praise and monetary gain; 



WHEREAS, Vernon Ferebee, Motor Equipment 
Operator II, in the E)epartment of Public Works, Street 
Maintenance, was employed at the age erf 16 years on 
January 1, 1943, and has performed a variety of tasks. 
His supervises have described him as a reliable, 
trustworthy, dependable, self-motivated and dedicated 
worker who has skillfully mastered various heavy-duty 
motor equipment. He sets an outstanding example for 
any Qty employee; 

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED; that the 
Virginia Beach City Council on behalf of its citizens, 
recognizes this dedicated City employee 
VERM)N FEREBEE 
who has reached his anniversary of FORTY YEARS in 
emplc^ment with the Qty of Virginia Beach. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That the Virginia 
Beach Qty Council publicly expresses its gratitude to 
Vernon Ferebee for his continuing efforts and for his 
reputation as an outstanding City emplc^ee. The Qerk 
of Cnmcil is hereby directed to frame this Resdution 
for presentatiOT with a copy spread upon the record of 
this regular Formal Session of City Quncil. 

Qven under my hand and seal this Twenty-Eighth 
day of February, Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Three, 
Mayor Louis R. Jones. 




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Admiring Ferebcc's certincale, left to right, arc: Walter Seaman; Oral Lambert, Director of Public Works; 
Mary Lopci; Phyllis Millettc, Director of Personal; and Ferebee. 



40 Years Of Public Service 



Magpog, Kwtcr, Hayden and Yeh 

Beach Resident Named Honorary Advisor 

Dr. Norma Magpog, left, Dr. Bettjr Yeh, for rigkt, ud Mr. H. Lee Kanter, Virginia Beach residents who are 
members (rfthe execntive board of tke lldcwnter Ballet Asiodation congratulate Melissa Hayden on acceptance 
of honorary advisor to the T.B.A. 

Hayden, an intematlQaally acclaimed ballerina will set and coach the famous "Stars and Stripes" Pas dc Deux 
and the Minkns, Pn> de IVota of Gcar|c BalMKhlM for the T.B.S.'s Spring Gala to be given May 4th in Center 
Theatre, Norfolk, cortafai time 8 p.ia. 

ncket itscrvatioas are now being taken «1 the T.B.A. Box Office or by called 622-4822 or 463-0022. 




Vice Mayor Barbara Henley presents Vernon Ferebee his Resolution in Recognition, (ceriificatc of appreciation), 
while (Council Members Jphn Bwn; William H. KltcMn, 111; Robert Jones; Jack Jenninp and Dak Binuon, city 
^tomey, watch. 




The City of Virginia Beacli Has One 

Independent Newspaper 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



57th Year, Nn.». 




Which Has Served The City For Over 



To Subscribe 



Fifty-Seven Years 



• • • 



Call 486-3430 



liMP 



mmmmmm 



mmtimmmmm 



T!16 Virginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 



iillllillillttlllillHUIIIllllllliillMllilllilllllllHIIH^ 



(! ri:i| ";,i 



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iiiMiiiiimiHiiniiiiiyii^iifflllBllBllHllllMlH 



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?^Wi^^?W^^J 



.Mt^ 



Guide To Virginia Beach 



^^nti 



aue& 



C^ouectlhu 



Schedule of Events 


Women's Aux lu the VBMS 


March 25 


2nd Annual Craft Show ^ 




Health Education Ctr. at 




Va. Beach General Hospital 




Norfolk School Art Show 


March 7 -12 


Military Circle Mall 




Mid Atlantic Wild Fowl Show 


March 4-6 


Pavilljon 


AU-Alll Info 


Va. Beach Art Ctr. Art Festival 


March 24 -26 


Pavillion 


428-4222 Info 


Youth Craft Day Every Tuesday. Ages 6-17 


Va. Beach Recreation Ctr. 


463-0505 Info 


-^ ^y^ f / 


// 



Yesterdays' 

— ' — Treasures 
Todays' 

Handicrafts 
Tomorrows' — 

Heirlooms 





Carraway House 

317 S.Witchduck Road 

Ia delighijul inp inio the 
\pasl wiih I8lh leniury 
Ireproduitions and antiques. 
I We carry soineihing for 
f everyone from SiiefJ 
Pewter and Baldwin Brass 
to beautiful Madisoni 
Square furniture. Alsol 
country items like candles,^ 
folk art, primitive pain- 






mgs. etc.. gift H e ms of a \ 
wide variety. Hours 10 til 5 

y daily. I "' -5 Sun. Closed 

[Wed. 
499-1901 



t ^*n t^^ I •J 

? \l ^i^fib/ "la ■^ir** 



[3 
111 



/^i^s^ 



L^»2). 






,ihe 





r^s 



sue 



a 



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V/N.S 



AdoP"°" Floral '^dipp**' 

""^ "w carry .^-"^^sbur* 
Also w« Wil"" irtflj flr- 

iwork W box*'':.,^ col 

England 
chers. 



/J 



Cloc"* 
uniq"* 



\ior 



ma" 



'"".us-ic 



K,l 




iordan'^^ountry 

comer of SatemS^ojd 
and Recreation Drive 

once there you will find a 
niiure ana «"™ 






I licn/j "Tje _ 








vl 



y. Hoffman Galleries 
2. Corner Cottage 



3. 
4. 



Jordan 's Country Shop 
Countryside Shops 



5. The Lady Peddler 

6. Mountain Crtrfts 



7. 
8, 



Grandma*s Attic, Inc. 
Carraway Hou^ 



lllilliillililliiliiMH^^^^^^^^ 



■■■■■■■■ 



Virainja Reach Sun. March 9, I9%i 17 



Th«ClMirch 



Church Hews 



Ar« Th* Churcli 



Open Door - Eight Years 
Of Outreach — — — — - 



Hie Open Door Chapel 
will be eight years old this 
coming August. The 
feUowship began in the 
Elks Lodge in the 
Rosemont area and from 
there moved to Holland 
Road where the ministry 
and attendance grew uc- 
mensely. Now the chapel 
is located in the old Prin- 
cess Hieatre and shopping 
mall. 

The church has changed 
significantly since its days 
at Holland Road. Pastor 
Stegemann feels that 
people should be discipled 
and nurtured and because 
of this, many outreach 
ministries have developed. 

During the week the 
pastor keeps very busy 
with seven sermons in ad- 
dition to hosting a daily 
radio show. 




clothes. Also it acts as 
assistance to people who 
have lost homes due to Tire 
or other circumstances. 
People who can afford to 
pay can obtain clothes 
there for tremendously 
low prices. 

Christian education is 
an extension of Open 
Door's goal in Christian 
discipleship. A new Bible 
coUege opened recently to 
teach the Bible from 
"cover to cover." A high 
school program is presen- 
tly underway with 54 
students attending. 

Located on 25 acres of 
land, Open Door Chapel 
has plenty of room to ac- 
commodate future growth 
and development. „ 

There is a deep concern 
for meeting the needs of 
the people. Of course this 
is not just for the people 
who regularly attend Open 
Door Chapel, but for all 
who are in need. 

There is a pleasant at- 
mosphere and a feeling of 
desire to serve. 



Church 
Announcements 



Capdfai Choir la CoMcrt 

The Music Ministry of First Baptist Church is 
pleased to present the A CapelU Choir from Car- 
son-Newman College in concert Wednesday 
evening, march 9, 1M3, at 6:30 p.m. in the San- 
ctuary. The church is locat«l at 312 KempsviUe 
Road in Norfolk, and the public is invited. 

For more information, contact Larry White. 
Minister of Music, 46 1 -6639. 

Indian River Bapttot Charch Day School 

Registration is open for Indian River Baptist 
Church Day School for children ages 2 - 5 years of 
age. 

Morning and full care prc^ams available as 
well as after school care are available. 

Call Day School (Martha Lennon, Director) at 
424-5700 for more information. 
Join To Be Prcscnied 

The film Joni will be presented at the First Bap- 
tist Church of Norfolk located 312 KempsviUe 
Road. The presenution will be on Sunday, march 
13 at 6:4!^ p.m. 

Joni is the dramatic story of a young woman's 
struggle to find a useful life in the wake of a tragic 
accident which left her handicapped. Before the 
onset of this tragedy Joni Eareckson was an out- 
stuiding athlete in a variety of sports. A divii^ ac- 
cident broke her neck, and from that moment she 
became a quadriplegic. Joni would never walk 
again. She faced many struggles and saw no pur- 
pose for her existence. ..until, drawing upon her 
faith in God she found a purpose for livii^. 



Worship Services 



One outreach ministry 
is a restaurant where lun- 
ches are served to the 
public daily. 

Originally opened as a 
soup kitchen to feed only 
the poor, it now is opened 



to the public on a non- 
profit basis. The only 
thing that is asked is an 
offering. 
Another outreach is the 

thrift shop where people 
who are poor can obtain 



Sunday 

Sunday School 9:15 A.M. 

Worship Service 8:00 A.M. 

10:30 A.M. 

Praise Service ^-^O P.M. 

Tuesday 

Bible Study 10:00 A.M. 




My Own 



I didn't need God! Used to botot iteut how I 
could stand on my own two feet. 

Then came ttie broken leg. With tots of time to 
think and little to do I began to (^cover jwother 
dimension of our existence. We aren't amiply "on 
our own." Sonw divine purpose links our Me to tfw 
Creator. Seekiftg that purpose and striving to fulfil It 
— that s what/life is really abort. 

I started «xng to church on crutches. 

The leg if fine now. except for » rt>che when 
It s going to rain. My larger view of Bte oonlinuei to 
enrich each day. 

And Im finding it easier to attend worship— on 
my own two feet! 



Make Reading The 
Bibie A Daily Habit 



•Exodus 
20:1-17 



Monday 
Matthew 
5:1-12 



Tuesday 

'Matthew 

5:17-37 



Wednesday 

Matthew 

7:1-12 



Thursday 

Luke 

10:25-37 



Fnday 

Proverbs 

3:1-35 



Saturday 
• Romans 
13:1-14 



HThe 
Open Door m4)i4o-i44i 
Chapd 

3m Va. Bcacii Bhrd., Va. BcKk, Va., 2MS2 

SUNDAY ■ IVfMlAY 

S«i« School. 

WonUpScntet 

PraiKScnrkc.. 



.9:1$ AM 
..•^•AM 
. le-J* AM WE1WI»AV 

..fcJtPM 



.TsWPM 



CMrl^oaJi J^^M^ofQod 




4- (^irstO^>af^ist &hurch 



WocMpScrriccs 



Sotf^SAool.... 
MofatagWonl^. 



.9-.4Sa.H. 
Umm.m. 



Emii«WonNp 

Ken HemphUi, Pastor 

• Rootf. Norfolk. V*.. 23Sa2 4il-M39 



\ 



*■ > PI 



.^^ 



Xi ^ABC/^y. 



^C 



i. 



PROVIDENCE ROAD - VtROMlA RE*C« VtRC«l* V 



Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 



CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

4925 Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard Campbell, Pastor 

495-lOfM 
Youth L.I.F.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. 



Kinp Grant Baptist Church 

873 Little Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

SUNDAY 

{WofriUp... §:•••.-. WEDNESDAY 

■. ra^iy Mi^ DlMMT. MS P.H. 



.tJSp.H. 



Jerry Hokomb, Pastor 



Now Available 
For Rental 



\^m 



Word 
HonicVMeo 



Video Cassettes Include: 

• Jhms DoktM • MN) GrainBi 
•Llo)«0^ir •AMKlMid 

• Jo^MLMiotf •HMiplf 

• DovW ktec • Aio) GnM 

Far ■ w e h fo r w rt ie a, i wi i *t ^ 

Longs ReUgious 
Simply 

2tW Moaacdto Ai«.. Nff oM t. Vs. 
C27-Mt9 




MimmATimnnKmmn 
mMLfUKLfamai 

IMIMMmVU 

Phaie W. McSmdti, Jr. Ptmm^ 

4Z4S70O 



18 Viiginia Beach Sun. March 9, 1983 



Virginia Beacli Public Notices 



UgalNotic* 



UfilHotlc* 



UialNotlct UialNotict 



Public HwrlBi I 



PhMc NMriRg 



TMbHcHMrlni 



Nfcic Ht arl Bg 



Public Notice 
Notice is hereby given 
that on February 23, 1983, 
Virginia Beach Television, 
Inc. filed an application 
with the Federal Com- 
munications Commission 
for construction permit 
for a new UHF Television 
Broadcast Station on 
Channel 43, 644-650 
• MHz, at Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. This station 
would operate with 
maximum effective 
radiated power of 331,9 
kilowatts visual, 33.2 
aural, and use an antenna 
with height of 518 feet 
above average terrain. The 
transmitter would be 
Ideated 0.7 miles southeast 
of the junction of Princess 
Anne and Indian River 
Roads, Pungo borough, 
cfty of Virginia Beach. 
The main studio would be 
located within Virginia 
Beach at a site to be 
determined. The officers, 
directors and 10 percent or 
greater stockholders of 
Virginia Beach Television, 
Inc. are as follows: Har- 
vey m. Budd, Mark Kane 
Goldstein, Thomas G. 
Sonsini, Dennis J. Kelly 
and American Satellite 
and Television, Inc. 

A copy of this ap- 
plication, together with all 
amendments and related 
materials, is available for 
public inspection week- 
days during regular 
business hours at the 



Virginia Beach Public 
Library, 936 Indepen- 
dence Boulevard, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 
189-1 1 3T 3/23 VB 



Public Notice 
Notice is hereby given 
that on February 22, 
1983 an application was 
filed with the Federal 
Communications Com- 
mission in Washington, 
D.C. by Tidewater Broad- 
casting Company, Inc. for 
authority to . construct a 
new commercial television 
station on UHF Channel 
43 -H, in Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, with the 
following technical 
facilities: Channel 43 +, 
644-650 Mhz; 5,000 kW 
visual and 500 kW aural 
effective radiated power. 
The proposed transmitter 
site is 2.2 miles West of 
the Intersection of Route 
17 and Route 64 with 
geographic coordinates 
North Latitude 36° 45' 
23" and West Longitude 
76' 23' 06". Height above 
average terrain of 522.9 
feet, with nondirectional 
antenna. Studio location: 
a site within the Virginia 
Beach city limits to be 
determined at a later date. 
The officer, director 
and sole shareholder of 
Tidewater Broadcasting 
Company, Inc. is 
Celestine L. Willis. 



Eye On 
Drunks 

Continued fVom Pii«e2 ' 

•That the time of day in which aicohol- 
related accidents most frequently occur in 
Virginia Beach is between 12 and 2 a.m.? 

•That the day of the week in which the 
most alcohol-related accidents happen in 
Virginia Beach is Saturday? 

•That drivers between the ages of 21 
and 24 are involved in the greatest per- 
centage of alcohol-related accidents in 
Virginia Beach? 

•That males are involved in 93.9 per- 
cent of all Virginia Beach accidents and 
are arrested for DUI in 87.9 percent of all 
cases? 

While such revelations were 
enlightening, they were not the featured 
attraction of the gathering. Rather, the 
meeting was called to announce the laun- 
ching of "Operation R.A.I.D. (Report 
All Intoxicated Drivers)." The program 
calls for citizens to report to police 
whenever they see suspected runk drivers 
on the road. 

Residents are asked to call the 911 
emergency number, give a description of 
the car, the license number, and its last 
known location and direction of travel. 
Police units will then be relayed this in- 
formation by a dispatcher. If said car 
can be found, police will then follow and 
determine if the vehicle should be pulled 
over. 

The hope is that potential drunk drivers 
will seek other means of transportation if 
they figure somebody else is watching 
besides the police. 

The problem, however, is that human 
beings can be very apathetic; not enough 
of them get involved in community ac- 
tions. Also, it seems somewhat unlikely 
that a reported drunk motorist could be 
located by the police once they have been 
alerted. He might be long gone down the 
road. 

Still, the program does have much 
potential, If the public would, for once, 
get off its collective hindquarters and 
become involved. 

The police can't do the job alone. Lob- 
bying groups such as Many Against 
Drunk Drivers can't do it by themselves. 
Drunk driving is like a sore which con- 
tinues to fester. So long as the masses ac- 
cept it and ignore, the problem will con- 
tinue to plague the community.— M.M.G. 



A copy of this ap- 
plication is available for 
public inspection during 
regular business hours at 
the following address: 
6636 Chartwell Drive, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
23464. 
189-3T3/23VB 

Public Notice 
The annual report of the 
Rosen Family Foundation 
is available for inspection 
at 134 Business Park 
Drive, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 23462 during the 
hours of 9:30 A.M. to 
4:30 P.M., Monday thru 
Friday, for 180 days from 
date of this notice. 
Martin L. Rosen 
Foundation Manager 
189-10 3/9 VB 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Proposed Highway Project 

Great Neck Road 

City of Virginia Beach 

All interested persons 
are advised that the Sate 
Highway and Transpor- 
tation Commission of 
Virginia has approved the 
rnajor design features for 
the proposed relocation of 
Great Neck Road, Project 
UOOO-134-108, C501, 
C502, from 0.01 mile nor- 
th of Shorehaven DRive to 
the intersection of Shore 
Drive (Route 60), in the 
City of Virginia Beach. 

The Federal Highway 
Administration has also 
concurred in the environ- 
mental document 
prepared for this project. 

Maps, drawings, a final 
environmental document 
and other information are 
available in the Depar- 
tment's District Office at 
Suffolk, and in its 
Residency Office located 
at the intersection of 
Business Route 13 
(Military Highway) and 
Route 168 in Chesapeake, 
for viewing by interested 
persons. 

State Highway and 
Transporration 
Commission of 
Virginia 
189-5 IT 3/9 VB 



LEGAL NOTICE 
Take notice that on March 
14, 1983 at 10:00 a.m. at 
the premises of Tidewater 
Imports, Inc. DBA Hall 
Pontiac GMC Honda, 
Inc. 3152 Virginia Beach 
Blvd., Virginia Beach, Va. 
23452, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, 
for cash, reserving unto it- 
self the right to bid, the 
following motor Vehicles: 
1982 Jeep CJ-7, Serial 
#lJCBM87AOCt048156 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA Hall Pontiac GMC 
Honda, Inc. 
F. C. Rice 
Comptroller 
189-6 1T3/9VB 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

On Feb. 23, 1983, 
Atlantic Telecasting Ltd. 
partnership filed with the 
Federal Communications 
Commission in Washing- 
ton, D.C. an application 
for authorization to con- 
struct a new UHF 
television station to 
operate on Channel 43 in 
Virginia Beach, VA with 
affective radiated tower of 
5000 kilowatts maxium 
visual and 500 kilowatts 
maximum aural. The 
proposed antenna site will 
be approximately 1.0 
miles north of city limits 
of Moyock, North 
Carolina (North latitude 
36°, 32 minutes, 57 secon- 
ds; West longitude 76°, 1 1 
minutes, 21 seconds). The 
main studio will be 
located on a site to be 
determined in Virginia 
Beach. The general par- 
tners of the applicant are 
Mrs. Carletta Marie Lloyd 
and Mr. Larry L. Harris. 
The limited partner of the 
applicant is Mrs. Marilyn 
Goldman. Copies of the 
application, amendments 
and related materials are 
on file for public inspec- 
tion at Virginia Beach 
Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va. Mon- 
day through Friday during 
normal business hours. 
189-4 3T 3/16 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, March 16, 1983, 
at 7:30 p.m., in the Council Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The stafi briefing will be at 6:45 in the City Manager's 
Conference Room. The following applications will ap- 
pear on the agenda. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 

1 . William Treschl requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building ad- 
jacent to a public street on Lot 35, Block 9, Section 7, 
Part 2, Aragona Village, 728 DeLaura Lane. Bayside 
Borough. 

2. Anita L. Murdoch requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 719, Section 
7, Malibu, 604 Wild Duck Key. Lynnhaven Borough. 

3. Wayne E. and Ida L. Fryman requests a variance to 
allow parking of major recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 6, Block B-B, 
Section 10, Lake Placid, 2461 Enchanted Forest Lane. 
Princess Anne Borough. 

4. David N. and Sherry L. Caldwell requests a variance 
of 5 feel to a 5 foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet 
as required (accessory building - garage) on Lot 29, 
Block 22, Section 6, Arrowhead, 212 Miami Road. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

5. Ruth K. and George M. Hagerman requests a varian- 
ce of 8 feet, to a 5 foot front yard setback (61st Street) 
instead of 13 feet as previously approved by the Board 
of Zoning Appeals (June 4, 1975) and of 8 feet to a 10 
foot side yard adjacent to a street (Oceanfront Avenue) 
instead of 18 feet as required and of 0.5 feet in ^• 
ce/wall height to 4.5 feet in fence/wall height instead of 
4 feet in fence/wall height as allowed in a required set- 
back from a street (both 61st Street and Oceanfront 
Avenue) and to allow the 4.5 foot high fence/wall to en- 
croach into the 20 foot visibility triangle at the inter- 
section of 61st Street and Oceanfront Avenue where 
prohibited (swimming pool) on Lot 1, Block 7, New 
Virginia Beach Corporation, 6007 Oceanfront Avenue. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

6. Franklin R. Thomas requests a variance of 1 1 feet to a 
9 foot side yard adjacent to a street (Shark Lane) instead 
of 20 feet as required (deck and screened porch) on Lot 
46, Section 2, Sandbridge Beach, 2245 Widgeon Lane. 
Princess Anne Borough. 

7. Henry L. Thompson requests a variance of 8 feet to a 
2 foot rear yard setback (south side) instead of 10 feet as 
required and of 1 parking space to 2 parking spaces in- 
stead of 3 parking spaces as required for a duplex on 
Lots 1 1 and 12, Block 8, Chesapeake Park, 4484 A & B 
Ocean View Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

8. Mr. and Mrs. D. V. White requests a variance of 6 
feet in building height to 41 feel in height instead of 35 
feel in building height as allowed on Lot 81, Section 2, 
Chesopeian Colony, Chesopeian Trail. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 



9. Kenneth B. and Judith C. Sears requests a variance of 
12 feet to an 8 foot rear yard setback instead of 20 feet 
as reqiiired (residential addition) on Lot 3, Site 8, Pem- 
broke Park, 4436 Bennett Lane. Bayside Borough. 

10. Jack and Evelyn C. Hill requests a variance of 7 feet 
to an 8 foot side yard adjacent to a street (Ticonderoga 
Road) instead of 15 feel as required (accessory building 
- garage) on Lot 12, Block 7, Section 1, Pembroke 
Manor, 4713 Crown Point Road. Bayside Borough. 

1 1 . Ocean Point Properties, Inc. requests a variance of 5 
feel to a 5 foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required of 1 side on Lot 13, Block 54, Shadow Lawn 
Heights, Close Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

12. Ocean Point Properties, Inc. requests a variance of 5 
feel to a 5 foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required of 1 side on Lot 15, Block 54, Shadow Lawn 
Heights, Close Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

13. Ocean Point Properties, Inc. requests a variance of 5 
feet to a 5 foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required of 1 side on Lot 17, Block 54, Shi^dow Lawn 
Heights, Close Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

14. Ocean Point Properties, Inc. requests a variance of 5 
feel to a 5 foot side yard setback instead of 10 feet as 
required of 1 side on Lot 19, Block 54, Shadow Lawn 
Heights, Close Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

15. N. Stephen Smith requests a variance of 2.6 feet to a 
22.4 foot side yard adjacent ,lo a street (Abington Road) 
instead of 25 feel as required (residential addition) on 
Lot 2, Block E, Section 2, Bay Colony, 1131 Abingdon 
Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

16. Vallie B. Trent requests a variance to allow the 
parking spaces (2) to be 8 feel by 20 feet instead of 9 feet 
by 20 feet as required on Lot 11, Chesapeake Park, 
Ocean View Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

17. John W. Garris requests a variance of 4 feet to a 6 
fool rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required 
(covered steps) on Lots 12 and 13, Block 53, Ocean 
Park, 2320 Raleigh Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

18. S & S Enterprises requests a variance of 6 feet to a 1 
foot setback for a freestanding sign instead of a 7 foot 
setback as required on Lot "H", Parcel, 290, Eastern 
Park, 2976 Virginia Beach Boulevard. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

19. Robert D. Zajack requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
15 foot side yard setback (north side) instead of 20 feet 
as required (accessory building - pool house) on Lot 2, 
Section 2, Linkhorn Cove, 1292 Alanton Drive. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. J. Christie Davenport requests a variance of 4.4 feet 
to a 15.6 fool front yard setback (Ocean View Avenue) 
instead of 20 feel as required and of 5 feet to a 3 foot 
side yard setback (west side) instead of 8 feel as required 
(possible 2nd and 3rd story addition) on Lots 9, and 10, 
Block 17, Chesapeake Park, 4824 Bay Bridge Road. 
Bayside Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 
Garland L. Isdell 
Secretary 
' 189-3 2T 3/9 VB 



line and running a distance of 805.30 feet along the 
Western property line. Said parcel contams 4.97 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BORCHJGH. 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

6. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officei^ in 
regard to certain elemems of the Subdivis.oi Ordi- 
nance. Subdivision for UUian B. Johnson. Property 
located on the East side of Avalon Avenue, 250 feet 
more or less South of Lancelot Drive. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in the Dcpartmem of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
Plats with more detailed information are available m 
the Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited to attend. 
Ruth Hodges Smith 
City Qerk 
187-9 3/9VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: 

Ihe regular meeting of the Qty Cminci! of Virginia 

Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the Qty 

Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 

Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on McMiday, March 

21, 1983, at 2:00 P.M. at which time the following 

applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of IXxninion 
Building Corporation for a modification to the Land Use 
Plan of Timberlake to include a commercial site of 1 .092 
acres located at the Southwest corner of Independence 
Boulevard and Foxwood Drive. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of ERA Amhdd & 
Company, Inc., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Residential District to R-9 
Residential-Townhouse District on prt^rty located at 
the Northwest corner of Princess Anne Road and 
Bellingham Road, running a distance of 131.54 feet 
along the North side of Princess Anne Road, running a 
distancx of 156.41 feet along the Western property line, 
running distance of 124.96 feet alrag the Northern 
property line and running a distance of 115.98 feet 
along the West side of Bellingham Road. Said parcel 
contains 16,988 square feet. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Applicaticm of Mrs. G.J. 
Gulbranscm and Mrs. Nancy Vest f» a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION fr«n R-5 Resi- 
dential District to O-l Office District on certain property 
located on the Ncwth side of Providence Road beginning 
at a point 260 feet more or less East of Indian River 
Road, running a distance of 600 feet al«ig the North 
side of Providence Road, running a distance of 290 feet 
along the Eastern property line, running a distance of 
740 feet alcmg the NcHlhem pr<^rty line, nmning a 
distance of 40 feet in a ScHitherly directiwi, rtmning a 
distance of 145 feet in an Easterly direction and miming 
a distance of 210 feet in a Southerly direction. Said 
parcel contains 4.41 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon y^plication of Allen J. Gcttel, 
Parliament Building and Roger W. Gray f<x a Cli^^E 
OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business Kstrict to I-l Light Industrial 
District oi certain prt^rty located at the Northeast 
intersection of Princess Anne Road and Parliament 
Drive, running a distance of 757 feet more or less along 
the NOTth side of Pariiament Drive, running a distance 
of 181.82 feet along the Eastern prqxrty line, running 
a distance of 750 feet more or less along the Northern 
property line aiid running a distance of 204.92 feet 
along the Western prc^rty .ine. Said parcel contains 
3.193 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance up<Mi Applitatioi of Kmensions, Inc. 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFI- 
CATION from R-5 Residential District to A-1 Apartment 

District on certain prc^rty located on the South side of 
Baxter Road beginning at a pant 1530 feet East (rf 
Wncess Anne Road, running a distance <rf 250 feet 
alcmg the Scwth side of Baxter Road, running a distance 
of 935.30 feet along the Eastern pr(^rty line, running 
a distance of 181.80 feet alcng the Southern property 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: . ..,,,.■• 

The regular meeting of the Qty Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
StatiOT, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Mwiday, March 
28, 1983, at 7:00 p.m. at which time the fdlowmg 
applicaticMis will be heard: 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1 An Ordinance upon implication of Nclstm P. Tibbitt, 

Jr., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CIASSIFI- 
CATION frOTi R-6 Residential District to A-2 y^art- 
ment District on certain property located at the 
Southeast corner of Pembroke Boulevard and Witch- 
duck Road, running a distance of 715 feet along the 
East side of Witchduck Road, running a distance of 100 
feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 
162M feet in a Northeasterly direction, running a 
distance of 169.8 feet in an Easterly direction, running 
a distance of 237.5 feet in a Northeasterly direction, 
running a distance of 40.12 feet in an Easterly 
directitMi, running a distance of 138 feet in a 
Northeasterly direction, running a distance of 101.70 
feet in a Westerly direction, running aidstance of 44 
feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 
39 feet in a Northeasterly direction, running a distance 
of 65.90 feet in a Northwesteriy direction, running 
adistance of 84.80 feet in a Northeasterly direction and 
running a distance of 256.94 feet in a Northwesterly 
directicHi. Said parcel contains 7 acres more or less. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

2. An Ordinance upon implication of Runnington 
Investmem Corp., for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from I-l Light hidustrial 
District to B-4 Resort Commercial District on the South 
side of Pinewood Drive, 100 feet West of Mediter- 
ranean Avenue. Said parcel is; located on Lots 17 and 
18, Block 8, Pinewood, and cMitains 6381 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 
CONDinONi\L USE PERMITS: 

VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon implication of Sea Pines 
Associates for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
temporary parking Irt on certain property located at the 
Southwest corner of i^lantic Avenue and 34th Street, 
running a distance of 210 feet alaig the West side of 
i\tlantic Avenue, running a distance of 130 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 90 feet in a 
Southerly directicm, running a distance of 100 feet 
along the North side 33rd Street, running a distance of 
300 feet along the East side of Pacific Avenue and 
running a distance of 230 feet along the South side of 
34th Street. Said parcel contains 1.31 acres, VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

4. i\n Ordinance upon i\pplication of Jrfm C. i\spinwall 
for a CONDITIONi\L USE PERMIT for mini-ware- 
houses cMi certain property located on the South side of 
ShOTC Drive beginning at a pdnt 600 feet more or less 
West of Independence Boulevard, running a distance of 
160.24 feet aloig the South side of Shwe Drive, 
running a distance of 531.65 feet alcmg the Western 
prc^erty line, running a distance of 40 feet in a 
Southwesteriy direction, running a distance of 25 feet in 
a Southeasterly directicm running a distance of 410 feet 
in a NcMlheasterly direction, running a distance of 415 
feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 
280.06 feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance 
of 137.09 feet in a Westerly directicsi, running a 
distance of 1 17.34 feet in a Southerly direction, running 
a distance of 355 feet in a Westerly direction and 
nmning a distance of 260 feet in a Northerly direction. 
Said parcel contains 4.4 acres. BAYSIDE BORCRJGR 
PUNGO BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of John H. and 
Thomas F. Gray for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for 2 single family homes in the AG-1 i\gricultural 
District on lots located on the East side of Knotts Island 
Road beginning at a point 311.06 feet North of the 
Virginia-North Carolina State line, running a distance 
of 15.64 feet along the East side of Knotts Island Road, 
running a distance of 451.69 feet in an Easterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 472.94 feet in a Northerly 
direction, running a distance of 570.64 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 15.62 feet 
along the East side of Knotts Island Road, i^nnihg a 
distance of 1388.40 feet along the Northern property 
line, running a distance of 5^.82 feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a distance of 1281.70 feet 
along the Southern property line. Said parcels contains 
13.5 acres. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARLANOE: 
PUNGO BOROUGH: 

6. iAppeal frcm Decisions of Administrative CMTicers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordi- 
nance, Subdivision f« Jcrfm R and Thomas F. Oay. 
Said property is located on the East side (rf Knotts 
Island Road, 311.06 feet North of the Virginia-Ncmh 
Carolina State line. Plats with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in the DeiMrtment of Planning 
PUI^JGO BOROUGH. 

Rats with mcx^e detailed infnmation are available in 

the Department of Planning. 

Ml interested perscms are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

Qty Qerk 

187-10 2T3/16VB 



mmmmmmmmmataammmmm 



Classified Ads 



V irginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 19 



3 



1. 



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Towed free. Some bou^. Call 
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ITFN 

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examination. For detaib caU 
Russell Harrison 420-3120 or 
ni(ht$ 547-3500. HIGGINGS 
REALTY INC. 

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I-4t-4/6 



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lUcdve a Mastercard or Visa, 
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for free brochure send S.A.S.E. 
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DIET AND HEALTH SEEKERS 

Safest most effective diet and 
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12 4T 3-16 



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INCOME TAX - and Account- 
ing (including tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. (near 
Rosemont Rd.) CaU 463-6608. 

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34T3/I6 



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. 44T3-23 

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73 or later tractor, terminal ad- 
vances and payoffs. Immediate 
openinp, caU (804) 798-9097 Mr. 
Bowman. 
I02T316 

SINCERE BOOK SALES - 

Agents wanted now, part time or 
full, do not confuse with usual 
worn-out offer. No itxperience 
needed. For details send $1 to 
Beech Sales, 4412-B. 
Schoolhouse Path, Portsmouth, 
VA 23703. 

10413-16 

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER 
General Superintendent. 
Medium sized and growing 
commercial/industrial contrac- 
tor seeking mature self starting 
individual with indepth construc- 
tion knowledge and hands on ex- 
perience, must be capable of 
communicating with properly 
motivating job superintendent as 
well as communicating with 
owner/customers. Send com- 
plete resume to: L. White Co., 
Inc., 208 Hudgins Rd., Fred- 
ricks. VA 22401. All replies held 
confldentialupon request. 
10 5T 3/30 

PROCESS MAIL AT HOME - 

$30.00 per hundred! No ex- 
perience. Part or fuU time. Start 
immediately. Details, send sdf- 
addressed, stamped envelope. 
Haiku Distributors. 113 
Waipalaai Rd., Haiku, HI 
96708. 

lO-TFN 



GOLDEN RETkEIVES • For 

Stud, AKC registered, dark 
golden, 2^ year old, cham|^» 
bloodline. Choke of fee or pick 
of Utter. Can after 3, 804-633- 
2031. 
UJB* 

STOP LIVING IN FEAR- 

Complete D(« Trailing 3 mon- 
ths to 3 years. Licensed from 
latest K-9 Corp. in the nation., 
CaU 481-6999. 
IMTN 

SIAMESE KITTENS - Red 

Point, registered; chcmpioa 
sired, slww quality, S200. 481- 
3338 

13TFM 

GERMAN SHETAU) Pup- 
pies - AKC rcgisurcd, for pet 
or show. SI30 and up. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 

SHEPARDS. CaU48S-IO*3. 
I^TFN 



15. 



REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER • 

Whirlpool, side by side, 
automatic ice maker, ice door, 
Servdoor, almond, 22 cu. ft., ex- 
cellent condition. S800. Call 623- 
5988. 
13 IT 3-9 

DISHWASHER • Needs gasket. 
$25. Call 420-7719. 

1577?,' 



ICArlielMFBrSBli 



11. PasHiMii Wantid 



J 







High Quality At Lo« Price 

BABY 
BAZAAR 

Baby Furnilurc by Ba5>scil 
Nursery Acccvsortn 






iltll lAV AWAY 

MAsnauMip-Maa 

467-5032 

ISiSl.yMriM*MPIi»>. 

hif^ntaRoa 

M-t M4 Sim §•■$ 



I S|xviaUiin»liir Special HabicN ' 

: 



^t,^<ii^*t^ m^ m^ m ^>i4h>^t^^ 



BABYSrniNG/HOUSE- 

keeping - Days. Tuesday thru 
Friday, 7:00 tiU 3:30. Experien- 
ced needs transporution. CaU 
4644466. 
ll-lt-3/9 

GENERAL HOUSE Cleaning 
rdiabk and experienced. Call 
340-1389. IITFN 

rCARPETl 
CLEANING 

■UAL ACTION STEAM 

CLEANMCairt ROTARY 

COMRWATIMI 

— AU WOW CUMiUiTErO- 

Uvtaf R*Mn ft Han: 

HMtmri Booms •9^ ea 
^■w iMMU M«MS * IM T( Me 

CALL S43-4S30 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



20 words or l^s - $4.40. AcWltlonal words - 22« each. 
Please print clearly using one word per box. 





































« 




4.40 


4.K 


4.84 


5.06 


5.28 


5.50 


5.72 


5.94 


6.16 


6.38 


6.60 



Please run ad for. 

Mail to: 
ByeriyPubllcatlmis 

P.O. BOX 1527 

ChesamsMe. va. 23320 



isues. or until cancelled ( ). 
Costofsln^adS 



Numb^ times to run 
Amount enclosed $ _ 



Name 

Addr^s 

Cltv- 

Yourteiepnonemimb^ _ 

AiiaA»n»A0S«UIIWT«O«SAPEAttK)STAI«TMiVWGHiAi»CMa»l 



.State- 



^P-^ 



L 



RH- HMD wltn your cumMetf ad, pM 



I547-4S71. 



17. 



WATERBED • QUEEN size, 
beater and pedestal iadudcd. 
ExceUent conditioii. S300 or best 
offer. CaU 421-2970 or 421-8307 
ask for Pat. 

mkia 

COFFEE TAIOJS . TiMs and 2 

Old tables. wM oak aMi pekay 
top. y^'rl hw* eoa d it l oB. S300 or 
bm offer. Can 421-2970 or 421- 
KfftmkfoiPu. 



SOFA AND CHAIRS 

ud tan plaid. 3 cusiuon. sofa, 2 
oUve green vdvetcea band back 
diurs, $73 each. Btock viayi bar, 
$30. 2 bean bag chairs, while and 
ydlow $3. CaU 420-7719. 
171TN 

3 PIECE SOLIDsTEAKWOOO 

Stereo Cabinet - 83" loi«, lou of 
storage space for tapa and 
records. Has Sony reOTo-red 
tape deck and Sony recdver 
SR6030, 30 watu per channd. 2 
Sansui speakers, SP2000. ^>ace 
in cabinet for turnuble. AU for 
$800. Call 388-Stll. 

17TFN 



It. 



ANTIQUE KITCHEN 

Wood/coal stove. Good ooo- 
ditioa. CaU days at 347-4371 af- 
ter 6 caU 485-4684. 
I8TFN 

IVORY COLLECTION - 

Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne neck- 
laces; Vases and Boxes. 1804 
Granby St., 625-9119. Daily 10^ 
3. 

18TFN 



It. 



21. TaltvMswttMW 



SWIMMING POOL SUDE - 

$230, Galvinized Big T Gym set, 
$20. 3 by 3 black slate black 
board, $15. Can 420-7719. 
I6TFN 

KEROSENE HEATER - 9300 
BTU, 5 gallon can, exceUent 
condition. $100 or best offer. 
Ask for Pat at 421-8307. 

IfrU?/? 

ELECTRIC HOSPITAL BEU- 
Complcte with naaitress, 3 ievd 
buttons, head, foot & hdghth of 
bed. Excdlent condition. Orig. 
$1200. One year old $600. Com- 
mode Chair -exceUent condition 
$35.00. Call 427-1901 Wed. thru 
Sun. 
IfclEN 

METAL PYRAMID SHELVING • 

18 foot long, 4 fed wide. Some 
shelves missing. $23. CaU 480- 
31 13 weekdays. 9-5. 

16 4T 3-30 



SEARS STEREO - AM/FM. 8 
track, turn table. $50. Call 420- 
7719. 

214TTFN 



22.JMMlry 



24.WairtiiTt0qr 



TABLE SAW • Prefer carbide 
Made. WiU pay cash. CaU 627- 
30208-5 p.m. Ask for Lisa . 

CASH PAID • Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
^assware, lamps, china, oil paii- 
tings, oriental tugi, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire htMisefulls. AUo, good 
used furniture. Call 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 
24TFN 

rfUNK CARS Wrecked w run- 
Diag, cash-free towing. We also 
buy used ladiaton and batteries. 
7 days a wedt. CaU 487-9222 or 
after 61>.m. 340-1039. 

24TFN 



GIRLS BIKES • 20 inch, $15. 10 
speed $35, 5 speed S23. CaU 420- 
7719. 

19 TFN 




TO Bur 

SOAP 



ft 

CALL 
Joe ML Decker 
Conpeny, bie. 

«22-1fS0 



When SomethiBg Needs 
Building or Repaired, You Need 

BLACK 

BROS. 

Home Improvement 
.Spcciali.sls 
• Buikliiip t onl raci or" Roof s»Carpori s*Garai^ 
•Baili Ranodcled*Room AddilkMS 
•Aluminum Si(linfi.<(« Kitchen Remodeling 

5^-7318 

llMRk i:. Btocit, Sr. 





Commercial & R^idential 

Design-BuikI 

Dean P. Eiwanb, Inc. 

Ro(mAiiiStk»t 



Ctes^xake 



2S.0MdTMiipT«Eal 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS - 

Across from Hurd Seafood 
Resuurant. Shucked in own 
natural jucies. By quarts, pinU, 
or bushels. CaU 340-5171. 

23-TFN 



2t. Ealirtifa^Mt 



G 



FOR SALE-70 Ballroom dance 
lessons. CaU Larry Dunn for 
more information 480-2 1 34. 
26-TFN 



LAMES JEWOJIY FOR SALE 

One ladies cocktaU ring with 43 
diaitioods and is 14 carat yeUow 
gold. Also a 14 carat white gold 
23 jewd ladies Bulova wtidi. 
Ring appraised at S3400 and 
wttdi an>raised at $1900. WUl 
idl either for half the apprised 
value. CaU 347-0138 after 3.-00 
p.m. 22 TFN 

PUBLIC SALE - GeBuiae 
Diamond Jewelry under $10. 
Free Brochure! Rush self ad- 
dreued envdt^ to Ann Rao, 
Dept. D, P.O. Box 1084, Rich- 
mood VA 2320S. 
2Mt-3/9 

14 KT GOLD HEART - With 
Diamond pendent, purclwsed at 
FiiM Jewlcry Store. Never worn. 
CaU 623-4040. 

22 4T 3-19 



iWsrk 
919-^1-2901 



27. tiTNCs/YBri SalM 



SPRING SALE - AU Red Tag 
items 30% off-Thursday thru 
Sunday-Also come see our 
regular priced giftware, sea 
shells, flowers and gifts. 
CHAPMANs riowCTs and gifu, 
farmcn markd, Virginia Beach- 
427-9038. 

27-It-3/9 



2t.U«afttw^iM 



LANDSCAPING SERVICE ■ 

Lawn and Garden restoration, 
grading and seeding. Free 
estimates. 421-7350. 

28 TFN 



FtrlMrt 



33, AiMvlMMrts ftf Rwrt 






GREEN RUN • In Virginia 
Beach, Apartmenu fw adulu. 1 
and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
2 bedroom townhouses. We pay 
heat and hot water. The Pines. 
CaU 468-2000. 
33-TFN 

APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS • Great Bridge. 4 
focati<ms, one and 2 bedroom 
apartments. From $M0. Rental 
office, 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

33TFN 



TAX RETURNS 

Dave Huff 

Accouniani 

CaU 48 1 -2687 

Bookkeeping and Tax Planning 

40-4T L_L6 

ALL TYPES ALTERNATOie 
ami starters repaired. BattleTwld 
Auto Electric. CaU 547-3230. 

40-TFN 



42. OM Cart 



CoasaKTcid- 
fjUMbcapiag Services 

TORO Sprinkler Systems In- 
stalled. North Landing Nursery 
(Next to Farmers Market), 
Virginu Beach. 427-6886 
29TFN 

JOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and U»ii ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-^49. 
29TI ' 

IT'S SPRING Planting time! 
Free copy 48 page Planting 
Guide-Catalog in color, offering 
one of the roost complete Unes of 
fruit trees, nut trees, berry plan- 
ts, grape vines, landscaping plant 
material. Waynesboro Nurseries 
Inc.. Waynesboro VA 22980. 
29 4T 3-30 

I 
MULCH-BUTLER AND SOI. 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
while on sale. We ddiver in one 
day. 833-0230 or 833-7467. 

29 TFN 



STORES AND STORAGE areas 

- AU sizes. Properties unlimited. 
Marvin Goldfarb. 399-8390, 484- 

1275. 

32 TFN 



HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 

itooH MldilkHH for aU 

parposci. Coavert 

garaie, raise doraNn. 

Aay type of Improv- 
OMHt. Bathroom aod 
Kitcbcii remodeling. 

R.H. BLACK 

39943S9 397.717t 



3S. 



FarRaat 



CHESAPEAKE WILSON 

Hights - One year old 3 bedroom 
Cape Cod, 2'A bath, great room 
mth a fire place, lar^ country 
kitchen. CaU 547-4333. 

33-lt-3/9 



BABY! rrriNG . R^ular basis. 
exceUent care, hot lunche%, and 
snacks. Lots of attention. 
Sparrow Road area, call 420- 
4259. 

424T3-I6 



St.RfalEstatt 



HOME RENTALS - Urgently 
needed in the Tidewater area. Let 
us handle your property for per- 
sonal attention. Call EUen at 
481-3177 or 481-0612. Letour- 
neou Realty. 
364T-3-23 

FOR SALE - By owner. Large 
Brick Colonial Rancher on 63 
acres, 35 miles South of Pder- 
sburg, near 1-83. Reduced sub- 
stantiaUy to $120,000. Brochures 
available. P.O. Box 36, AlberU, 
VA 23821. 
36-21-3/16 



ST.LatsFariait 



CXMETERY LOTS • WoodUwn 
Memorial 'Gardens, 2 lots in St. 
Lukes section. Paid $800 wiU seU 
for $700. CaU 583-9343. 
37-4t-3/23 



W- Mtfcttlhawt 



HOLIDAY - 1975, excdlent 
condition, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 
and appUanccs, new vinyl skir- 
ting, plus many exras. Moving 
must sell. Home must be moved. 
$9,400 or best offer. Cdl 468- 
0770. If no answer caU 427-2176. 
38 TFN 






INCOME TAX - and Account- 
ing (including tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd., (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Call 463-6608. 
39-TFN 

BOOKKEEPING - Monthly 
balance-sheet, PAL detailed 
trial talance from your checks 
and recdpts, stubs, or register 
tapes. 94rs and VA-5's. Up to 
2O0 checkbook transactions 
monthly; $43. Payables, recdv- 
aUe, small payroll. Chesapeake 
only. Call 420-6623. 

39-TFN 

BOOKKEEPING SERVICE - 

Including quarterly payroll 
reports and bank account rccon- 
ciUation. Specializing in snaU 
proprietorships. Pick up and 
deUvery. Retired professional. 
Call 420-5624. 

39 TFN 



4t.Scrvkti 



BOOKKEVER • WUl do books 
in my home. Experioiced in 
payroU and quarterly rduros. 
Pick-up and deUvery soviet. 
CaU 343-4096 afta 3 p.m. for 
more information and rdes. 

40WTFN 



wmcmumun — 



PUMHK - afCTMUl 

CMPEMTRV - P/UKTM 

Pod Service and SuppBes 

avToi. EMepnm Dajn/Cm: 
I 



,aX120w(cftBani 

$795.00 

(CALLTOOAY) 

STATE LINE BUILDERS 




Gwaga • UtUUy Bvm • Any Siu 

Ml 
M»i ac it, W.C279St 
9m43t411t Ha 



JIM LEWIS 
Ot««MtW 




RI6ETI^nrES...l7 Okjr 

• FoiaaUstAteaMes eBaaaes 

• Mmtottes eFnefriili^.ttc- 
SeO C4SZI SK. Tt. Back a4B ^3-lttS 



41. CarpMliy 



CARPENTRY. PAINTING. 
ROOIING - and all types of 
maintenance. Storm windows, 
gutters and Krecns repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanders Con- 
struction. 420-8433. 

41 TFN 



4S. 



MASTER PEST Control • 
Scientific extermination. Sand 
and moisture control. windowsiU 
and joice repair, house jacking. 
Free Termite inspection. $5 off 
on termite control, $50 off on 
roach control with this ad. 
F.H.A. t V.A. reporU given. 
Cair487.4Q24. 

43-66t-3/9/i4 



47. 



ADiMTM>NS - Rooms, garages, 
convert garages, decks, etc. 
Quality work by a licensni 
buUder. Free estimates. CaU 340- 
2311. 
47 TFN 

ADOmONS, ROOMS - car- 
pentry, roofing, siding, storm 
window, storm doors, plastering, 
dectric, concreU work, plum- 
bing, guttering, remodding, kit- 
chen and baths, brick and Mock 
work, aluminum siding, 
fireplaces, carpeting painting, 
spedaUzing in parking areas and 
driveways, all type of 
derooUtion, free estimate without 
obligation, prompt service. Ser- 
ving ail of Tidewater. Bonded 
and Insured, Sute Registered. 
CaU 623-7435, 623-6148, or 499- 
3316. 

47-TFN 



4va RMVMp w 



ANDOSON RiMODEUNG • 

All types of home repairs. Pain- 
ting, roofing, siding, carpentry, 
etc. Work guaranteed. Free 
estimates. Insured and boo^d. 
CaU 388-2338. 

49TTN 



SI. 



TYPING SERVICE - For 

InisiMsscs and individuals. 7 
days a week, IBM Sekctrtc. 
Reasonable rates. CaU dtker 
467-7112, KenqMvlUc area, or 
463-0236, Hilltop/Pembroke 
area. 
40 TFN 

INCOME TAX SERVICE - 

Over 23 years combined ex- 
perience, tow tax fees, same day 
service. CaU Commonwealth for 
free estimate, 461-4308. 

4rtrr4-6 



WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING-Fast and friendly 
service, local references fur- 
nished. Call us for a free 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contractors. 420- 
3478. 

3ITF»y 

PAINTING - Large or small 
jobs. Interior and extcriw. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
priees. References available upon 
re^iest. Commercial work also 
(tooe. and Ught carpentry and 
waUpapering experience. Call 
397-3483 or 484-1423. 

31 TFN 



a4.raaiBpap^ 



THE LEIGH PHOTOGRA- 
PHIC SERVICE Offers fuU 
coverage of your needs at your 
wedding. Please caU for more in- 
formation and open dates. 482- 
1312. 

3^TFN 



^ 



BATHMMNM ^EMOKUNG - 

OM ud new. ^Spccidizing in 
oeramk tik walls and floor 
covcrog. Rc»ooabie rates. Free 
fUHMTi 20 yean experience in 
Tidewaier area. Small and larye 
iobs. Guarantee ail work. CaU 
M7-4774anytiac 

35 TFN 



SEAM SEWING MACHINES • 

I mUk crttoet, $73. I witho« 
calMKlS25.Ctf 430-7719. 

36 FFN 




20 Virginia Beach Sun, March 9, 1983 






Buchanan Expects '83 To Be Best Year Ever! 



For tN past 3 yfn Ronofe Bvchanan has been owner-president of Buchanan 
Anto and Anction, Inc., after serving 12 years as owner of Buchanan Auto Sales, 
and a former General Manager of Tidewater Auto Anction. 

Mr. Buchanan, Just 39 y«ws of age, is considered one of the area's leading 
authorities on the value of motor vehicles, having sold over an fstiraated 150,000 
automobiles in his 18 years of auctioneering. 

He is a member of the NaUonal Auctioneers Association, National Society of Ap. 
praisen, Retail Mercbanto Afsodation, Virginia Independent Automobile Dealers 
Association ami the Norfolk Chamber of Commerce. 

He condacto an average of 12 to 20 sales per year Involving business foreclosures, 
bankruptcies, U^uMations,. estate sales, and various other types of outside sales. 

Ronnie Buchanan, a native of Canton, North Carolina and lifelong resident of 
Tidewater, presently itsides In Chesapeake and may be reached at his office 9 a.m. 
to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday at 485-3342. 



Buchanan Auto and 
Auction, Inc., of 3201 
South Military Highway 
in Chesapeake is presently 
entering its sixth year of 
service to the residents of 
Tidewater. During that 
time they have developed 
a reputation as one of the 
finest and largest public 
auction houses on the East 
Coast. 

Buchanan's offers a 
unique opportunity for 
the non-dealer buying 
public to purchase 
automobiles on the same 
wholesale basis which has 



for years been the ex- 
clusive domain of local 
automobile dealers. Their 
Saturday morning auc- 
tions offer for sale over 
3,000 vehicles a year, 
which are vehicles 
repossessed on behalf of 
over 25 major banks, 
credit unions and finance 
companies serving the 
Tidewater area. This selec- 
tion is complemented by 
the addition of late model 
vehicles from various 
leasing and rental agen- 
cies. 
On a given Saturday at 



Buchanan's, you can find 
anything from late model 
(82 - 81) to antiques. Price 
range of vehicles may vary 
from M 5,000 to »200 on 
any given occasion. Con- 
trary to many popular 
myths surrounding 
automobile auctions, this 
sale is fertile ground for 
retail buyers to purchase 
at whole sale dealer prices. 
Over half the vehicles 
they sell are bought by the 
non-dealer public. In the 
words of Ronnie 
Buchanan, "The day of 
the public auto auction 



has arrived." The future 
of the company appears to 
be limited only by the con- 
fines of present available 
space. Buchanan expects 
1^3 to be best year ever. 
Anyone interested in pur- 
chasing or selling a ve- 
hicle through Buchanan's 
may contact any of their 
six full time employees by 
dialing 485-3342. Office 
hours are Monday through 
Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Professional appraising 
services are available ^y 
scheduled appointment. 
Notice of sale is a- 



vailable through the Chesa- 
peake Post and the class- 
ified sections of most local 
newspapers. 

Auction Schedule for 1983 

All sales held on Satur- 
day and begin at 10:30 
a.m. 

March 19, April 9, May 7. 
May 21, June 4 and June 
18. 

July 9, July 23, August 
6, August 20, September 
10, October 1, October 15, 
November 5, November 
19 and December 10. 



■ ;V. ' . ^-I -I'^X . .■V.-.-:v.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.:.U 



SELL YOUR CAR FOR CASH 



^^?^^M^'A^^i^i^j^^s^^^i■!<^^■i•i■t^>^■i■^i■^h■H■i:^i:?Sfei^^^ 

I Now 's The Chance To Sell Your Car At Virginia's Largest | 

i Public Auto Auction. Guaranteed Cash Offer. No Hassles. | 

1 



No Waits. 
For Information & Details, Contact: 

^aa»a^»a^»>^i■a^^tf^:■:■:^:«^:■:^:■:^^^ ; v i ■^■■^^^»^ 



Buchanan Auto Auction 

3201 S. Military Hwy. Chesapeake 
485-3342 



I 



m 



m 



v-'ri'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'''-'-'''''''''''''''''*'*'*'*'''* 



tY'r''M'''t'i*i*i*i't't't'i't't'i'i 



SPECIAL PRICES ON ALL CUSTOM VANS 

$0^0^500 



AS LOW AS 



8783 



NO ONE ANYWHERE WILL OUT 
SELL OR OUT TRADE VIRGINIA'S 
LARGEST VAN DEALER. 




3443 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Next To Princess Anne Plaza 

DMV8502 




First Time Ever! 



NOWAVAILABU 



•.a LiTia Misn.. 





^ KLINE Clieyrolet 

1495 S. Military Highway 

3 Miles South Of Military Circle 424-181 1 



WYNNE MOTOR 
CORP. 



March Into 
RK Today. ., 



i( \i)ii I \i 



\V hill I :ii .\ I 



13,695 



''>,(>% 



ii iimiu r.i.kM^, isi.ki 



M 2.559 



11, I' \* 



\ < UKdl I \ 



10.895 



0.995 



NEW 1982 
CORVETTES 

Collectors' Edition 
& Regular Corvettes 

2 % OVER 

DEALERS COST 
ManjilodiooMlrom! 



NEW 1983 

DIESEL 

CHEVETTES 

Sloidi 411568 

*6,875 

WARRAKTV.eOMIKi*/!!. 

spL iransniission 



I SI l)( \H si'i ( 



si I'M! Ml H 



HI n \ ! ^1 N ; MM t il CI 
Villi \ I \M I M Ni^r, 



'5,595 



M,895 



i ,A- I FliiltM ( ■!( , 



^1.895 



^7,495 



24 MONTH. 24.000 MIIF. WARRANTY 



VVVSM MOTOR (ORP. 



461 68(M) 



1 1977 CUTLASS 

I Auiomaiic irinsmiuion, power siccrini, 

I power brakes, iir coadilion, slcreo, 

I »uck «8089A >'t'l'7C 

1979 GRAND PRIX 

V 8. luionalK ir>n>nii»ton, air am- 
diiion, bucket seals, stereo, 

! slock #iM3A. *4975 

1 19«1 CUTLASS CLASSIC 

I V-6. auiomaiic Iransmiiiios, power 
Lnemi^, air condiUoa, sum osteite. 
I Iwo-lone, 

i:4«36»A 17475 

I^IVWBUS 

Mc>l ,4ipd..9paiKmer, 
Mock IKDOA. 7495 



RK 



r m vKCiis 



mi RELIANT 4 DOOR 

4 cyl.. auiomaiic iransniission, pown 
sieerinj, power brakes. 

Slock «J56A »4995 

1979CAMAROZ-2I 

V'l auiomaiic iransmission. power 
sieering, poer brakes, air condiiion, 
power windows, FM stereo, 
stock f 1J09A >6Q7< 

1979 NOVA 4 DOOR 

6 cyl., auiomaiic transmisaoo. power 
steering, power brakes, air condiiion 

.t«k,.„*A ,3g^g 

I979CAMARO 

V », auiomaiic transmission, air con- 
diiion. stereo, 
slack#l}34B *4175 



lYNNHAVEN PKWY. 

AT 

VA BIACH BLVD 



486-2222 







You don't give up 

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2 Agriculture Week 




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CRAFTS 

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Arrowhead Pbiio 

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1201 South Military Highway, Chesapeake, Virginia 



'"nie 1982 Yearbodc of 
Agriculture," a practical 
book for fanners and con- 
sumers, is avaUable from 
the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

Titled "Foods frcmi 
Farm to Table." the book 
contains marketing 
informiuioii for fanners 
and buying information 
for consumers. 

Ihe theme of gettmg 
more for one's money is 



stressed in the bodc's 
three major sections- 
production, marketing 
and smart food buying by 
consumers. 

At the, same time, the 
416-page book shows how 
the food chain affects our 
economy, generating 
about 20 percent of the 
nation's gross niuional 
product and employing 23 
percent of the labor force. 

The hardback book has 



32 pages of color photo- 
graphs, pore than 90 
black-and-white photos 
and an index. 

Copies of the 1982 Year- 
book, "Food from Farm to 
Table," may be purchas- 
ed by sending a S12 check 
or moiey order to Suprin- 
tendent of Documents. 
Washington, D.C. 20402. 
Sales copies also are avail- 
able at government \xxk. 
stores in many dties. 



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INCORPORATED 

900 TIDEWATER DRIVE/NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 23504 



* 368,000 Jobs And $17 Billion 



Affkulture Week 3 



Virginia's No,. 1 Industry. 



"In 1982 Virginia agri- 
culture was credited with 
generating $17 billion in 
direct activity and supply- 
ing jobs for 368,000 peo- 
ple," said Agriculture and 
Consumer Services Com- 
missicHier S. Mason Car- 
baugh. "While we benefit 
three times a day from the 
products of our Number 1 
industry, most of us know 
very little about agricul- 
ture and its importance as 
a major force in our 



econcmy. 

"The week of March 
20-26, 1983 has been set 
aside as >^rginia Agricul- 
ture Week to call attention 
to the continuing impoc- 
tance of this great indus- 
try and its economic and 
cultural impact on the Old 
Dominion. From its begin- 
ning and to this very day 
famuns has been the 
basis of Virginia's well 
being. There is a continu- 
ing need to impress upcHi 



all of our citizens the 
contributions and impor- 
tance of this industry. 

"In spite of being the 
most productive segment 
of our society, agriculture 
today stands at the cross 
roads and it cannot be too 
strongly emphasized that 
neglect and low priority 
will eventually lead to 
deterioration of almost 
any worthwhile activity, 
endeavor or industry." 

"Let me recall the 



words of the respected 
historian Bernard De Voto 
who noted that the Span- 
ish in search of gold 
neglected their agricul- 
ture and have been hun- 
gry ever since. This was 
brought home to me on 
my visit to China where 1 
saw first hand the de- 
struction of the fotesi 
lands where the pupulace 
used it for fuel, but made 
no plans for replacing 
natures gift, or a trip to 

Se« Industry, page 5 



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Dairy Producers Wait 
For Information 



Although milk production figures aren't available for 
1982, production should show a two percent increase. 
The average dairy herd also increased abcxit three cows 
per farm, bringing the average milking herd size to 98. 
The average Virginia cow produces about 15,000 
pounds of milk a year. 

"Average milk production per cow," the specialist 
said, "has increased about 250 pounds a year for the 
last six or seven years. Previously, the gain in 
^ production was about 140 pounds of milk per cow." 

Farms have become more efficient and practice new 
technology. Low grain prices for feed, stable milk 
prices, and low beef prices fcx culled cows made 
dairying quite attractive. Jones observed. 

Jones said that, unlike some states, Virginia's 
consumption of dairy products just about matches the 
amount produced so that the state is hot classified as 
one that exports milk. 



Mike Duman Ford-Mercury 
Has Your Size Truck 



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• PowwbrMes 

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hubs 

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suspension 



Mike Duman Ford-Mercury 

Salutes The American Farmers!! 



1600N.MalnSt.,SiiffoNc 
539-159S (Suffolc) 627-8944 (Norfolk) 



AUCTION 

Farm Machinery 

Saturday, April 2, 1983 - 10:30 A.M. 

The Estate of Joseph E. Korieski 
U.S. nZ & S.R. ftS24f Northampton County 

CapevHIe, Eastern Shore, VIrghifa 

10 - Farm Tractors - Intemathmai, OUvers & 

Massoy-Ferguson 

20 -Trucks - Some with Bulk Potato Bodies, Others 

With Dumps, Pkfcups ft Servke Truck 
16,000 Feet of 4'% 6", 7" A 8" brigathMi Pipe ft 
3 - 6 X 6 Irrlgatkm Pumps 

Plus, one of the fhiest bulk and bag automatk grading 
potato system on the Eastern Shore • Habies, J.R., 
American ft Boggs Equipment 

Late Model • Ptows, Discs, Beders, Planters, Cultivators 
ft Harvesters. 
10 ' X 60' • 100,000 Lbs. Drive-On Scales 

21 ACRES OF LAND with residence, BuikOngs, Packfaig 
Shed, Farm Shop ft 2 Irrigation Ponds 



Put llila date dmm M yow calMdar. YoM don't want to mlM tt. Thto Is 
raal Nice oqulpinMit Watch for ado wHh compiote llstk«. Sale 
authorized by Beni. W. Mears, Jr., Exeoitor. 

For Information, Call or Write: 

JACK PEOPLES 

Bonded Aucttoneer 

1340 Nead of River Road 
Chesapeake, Va. 23322 

804/ 421-2525 

N.C.A.L. #1517 



■MBililHi 



I^BM^ 



d 



4 Agric "re Week 



^ # 



il 


W ^s,. 


i 


w 

M 


4 f 





"fw 



T 



Soybeans Have 
Record Yields 



Virginia soybean producen had a very good year 
during 1982, except when it came to selling their 
products. 

Preston H. Reid, Virginia Tech Extensian agroncxnist 
in soybeans at the Tidewater Research and Continuing 
Education Center, said soybean producers had good 
yields but received "exceptionally low prices during 
1982." 

Despite the fact that wet fields considerably slowed 
harvesting of the crop, a new record yield of 28 bushels 
per acre was achieved. The record yield of 28.5 bushels 
per acre was set in 1979. 

Reid said that although the final figures have not 
been tabulated, they should not change too greatly. 

The pri<xs at the Norfolk terminal ranged from a kw 
of SS.02 to S6.90 per bushel during the year. The 
average price, however, was between SS.20 and $3.30 
per bushel. ' 

The number of acres planted in soybeans in Wginia 
continued to expuid as new varieties have made it 
possibk to grow soybeans in every county. 

Last year, nMre than 680,000 acres of soybeans were 
planted in % A%ginia camties. Reid expUined that a 
country isn't imduded in soybean production unless 
more than 100 acres of the aap are planted. 

Fifty-five percent of this year's was douMe-aopped. 
This means that the producer grew two CTOps on the 
same fold in one growing season. 

The Extension spedalat pointed out that no-till 
soybeans are continuing to be popular among Virginia 
farmers. Seventy-five percent (rf the doubk-a-ofqKd 
soybeans were grown by the no-till method. 

Reid believed that the number cA acres planted in 
soybeans will ontinue to increase in V^i. Some ^res 
in the federal set-aside program ultimately will result in 
more soybean production. 
A measure of stability 
was added to the produc- 
tion scene, he said, when 
President Ronald Regan 
signed the Contract SaiK- 
tity Bill. The bill primarily 
says that contracts signed 
before a trade embargo is 
established will be honor- 
ed. The only exception 
would be in the case cX 
war. 

"This bill gives our 
growers a sense cS secur- 
ity." Reid said. "A lot rf 
peof^ don't realize that 
55 percent (A ^%ginia's 
soybeans are sent over- 
seas. "Tlw two ixevkws 
presidential embargoes 
that cancelled existing 
contraas had an ad^wrse 
affect and made the pro- 
ducers a little leery about 
pariicipating in pr(^rams 
which could be stepped 
e\en \^hen valid contraas 
ewted." 



Egg Prices Vary... 



Preliminary ost estimates suggest that Virginia egg 
producers only had somewhat fiivorable i»ices for their 
products during the first three months of 1982. 

Paul L Ruszier. Virginia Tech Exteiuion poultry 
scientist in conunercial eggs, said that lower egg prices 
during the remainder of the year caused returns to dip 
below costs in many instaiKes. This was abnost a 
repeat of what happened in 1980 and \9%\. 

In 1^1, which is the latest year for which figures are 
available, Virginia producers sold 947 million eggs i<x a 
gross income of S63.2 million. 

Virginia's 145 commercial egg producers produced 
most of that total, he said. The 40 to 50 non-commercial 
producers with less than 1,000 birds aM a little to the 
total but most eggs conK from the 145 producers. 

Ruszier noted that the recent bumper grain crop was 
a contributing factor in keeping many producers in 
business due to the fiict that grain prkxs are low. He 



said many of the state's egg {n'ocHiccn haw bpen 
(grating « a margin or below ojsts fer several yean 
and cannot continue to do so indefinittly. 

Nationally, he noted that nroducers have been 
reducii^ the number of replacement pullets being 
added to their flocks. Through September, eggs 
hatched for the production of commerci^ pullets were 
one percent below the 1981 figures and seven percent 
below 1980. 

An indication of the decline in replacement pullets is 
the percentage of tlw flocks that has been force molted. 
Force molting is a process that gives hens a rest from 
laying so that when they start laying again, they are 
more productive than before their rest. 

"In 1982," Ruszier said, "The percentage of the 
ftock force molted stayed above 18.6 percent. The 
percentage increase of the laying flocks being force 

See E«s> pages 





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Agriculture Week S 




Sheep Industry On Rise 



G & S Equipment Co. Inc. 

Call « 

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Industry, continued from page 3 

Brazil where their rail 
transpo'tation system suf- 
fered because of an 
aggressive road building 
program." 

"The industry of agri- 
culture is no different 
than these examples. 
Althcmgh it has strength 
today, neglect and low 



priority can destroy all 
that we have spent over 
375 years creating." 

"Today agriculture is 
the cornerstone of our 
econiomy. But it will be so 
only if we make plans for 
the future." 

"Our support today will 
assure a bright tomorrow 
for Virginia's Number 1 
industry." 



After nearly two decades of decUne, Virginia's sheep 
industry appears to be on the rise. 

That's the opinion <rf Steven H. Umberger, Virginia 
Tech Extension animal scientist in sheep. 

Noting that Virginia's sheep industry is the largest in 
the East and the second largest east of the Mississippi 
River, Umberger observed that despite a dip in prices 
during the year, more producers seem to be showing an 
interest in raising sheep. 

He attributes much of this interest to cattle producers 
who are adding sheep to their livestock inventories now 
that research has shown that sheep and cattle can graze 
the same pastures. 

"A cattle producer," Umberger said, "can add one 
sheep per cow to his holdings without damaging his 
pasture. Since sheep are more effiwienl in converting 
grass to pounds of live body weight, they can produce a 
chdce carcass by grazing on pasture alone." 

He observed that three major supermarket chains 
have, committed to always having lamb at their meat 
counters, a situation that has not been always the case 
in Virginia. 

Last year, Virginia avtraged 129 lambs saved per 100 
ewes. The 129 percent lambing rate placed Virginia in 
the number two spot nationally in that category. 

Last year, Virginia producers raised 100.000 market 
lambs and sold 950,000 pounds of wool. 

Agusta. Highland and Rockingham counties continue 
to lead the state with 40 percent of the sheep but llocb 
can be found in almost every country. Flock sizes 
ranged from five to 1,500. 

Prices were down during the year, he said, ranging 
frOTi 70 cents a pound in the spring to 45 cents in the 
fall. The average value per head dropped from $69.50 
to $58.50 while cash receipts from marketings were 
somewhat lower at $5.6 million. 

"1 believe the sheep industry will continue to grow," 
Umberger said. "It is the only livestock species which 
will make a profit year in and year out." 



Heinold Commodities Inc. 
\bur Best Move in Futures 



Heinold Commodities, Inc. is a 
subsidiary of DEKALB 
AgResearch, Inc. and an affliate 
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Cattle Markets. 




Commodity futures trading is our 
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Suite 108 

Yorktown Commerce Ctr. 

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Home Phone: 



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£^ 



6 Agriculture Week 



Record Crop For Corn 



Virginia corn producers needed a record corn crop in 
1982 to come close to breaking even financially and they 
got it. 

Although final production figures are iMt yet 
available, it appears that the state avenge will be at 
103 bushels an acre with total production being in 
excess of 62 million bushels. This shatters the previous 
record of 90 bushels which was set last year. 

Virginia producers needed the increased production, 
said Virginia Tech Extension specialists, because corn 
prices remained low during the year. Com was sclUng 
in late 1982 for $2.17 a bushel and the spedalists 
estimated that it costs farmers about $3.25 a bushel to 
grow a 100-bushel per acre crop. 

These costs include seed, chemicals, machinery, 
labor and land. The only way to make money on corn 
production at current prices is to grow high yields per 
acre and use top management practices, the specialists 
said. 



The number of Virginia producers growing more than 
200 busheb oer acre exploded durins the year. Charles 
aty, James Qty and New Kent counties had 10 
farmers which exceeded the ^X> bushels per acn 
figure. C.H. Branch of James Qty County achieved 
220.97 bushels per acre. 

As remarkable as these figures were, they were not 
the highest. Two Hanover County formers, using 
irrigation, averaged 227 and 224 bushels per acre. 
Several otter prodiKxrs in the Shenandoah Valley also 
were reported to have topped the mark. 

Com acreage for grain during ibe year was estimated 
at 393,000 acres which was down fi-om the previous 
year. Also down from the previous year was the figure 
for corn silage- 180,000 acres. The com silage figure 
averaged 16 tons to an acre with total production being 
2.880,000 tons. 



See Corn, page 1 3 



-•r 




Bergeys 
Dairy Farm 



Visit our Country Store 
where we've been selling 
farm fresh n:iilk and 
Homemade Ice Cream 
for 50 years. 

2221 Mt. Pleasant Rd. 
482-4711 




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CHEVY PICK-UPS • MMMBJR ONE IM AMERICA 





Tough Chevy Trucks Are Taking Charge 

R.K. CHEVROLET 

Salutes The American Farmer ! ! 

LYNNHAVEN PARKWAY AT VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. • 486-2222 



^mmm 



J^arm Depression 

i^. — ^- ■ 

A Virginia Perspective 



Dust bowl imges of 
pluinmeting farm mconae 
and buikniptcy abound in 
natural press rqKMts on 
American agriculture, but 
Virginia agriculture is not 
a picture of total 
destitution, said Virginia 
Tech agricultural 
economists recently. 

Thve will be ifisasto- 
in the futures of some 
Virginia farmers, but 
diversification works in 
favor of the common- 
wealth when facing severe 
recession. 

Virginia features both 
sizable livestock and cash 
crop industries; northern 
and southern crops; 
products with government 
price supports and those 
not so supported; and 
products heavily involved 
in contract pricing and 
those not so involved. 

Among top Virginia 
commodities are several 
with fairiy good income 
pictures. Virginia tobacco, 
which was the state's 
number two cash receipt 
commodity in 1%1, en- 
joyed good prices in 1982. 
Peanuts, the number 
seven commodity, had a 
healthy support price. 

Hog producers in 1982 
enjoyed a year's respite 
from low prices and bad 
conditions to be profitable 
in the year following their 
^ number five ranking in 
Virginia agriculture. 

Contract pricing (com- 
mitting future production 
to a buyer at a predeter- 
mined price) is the key to 
relative stability in the 
face of weakening prices 
in broiler, turkey, ami egg 
industries which made up 
fourth, eighth and tenth 
places in Virginia 1981 
cash receipts respectivdy. 

Price supijort programs 

^ iKlped the number one 

cash receipt agricultural 



industry dairying weather 
a crisis of surpluses, but 
the number three industry 
in cattle and calves had 
weak|Hices. 

Soybern and corn 
produces, uxth and ninth 
respectivdy in 1981, had 
to rely on exceptional 
[n-odtKtivity in 1982 to 
Ih^ to bretk even. There 
are no prospects for 
dramatic improv^nents in 
prices in the near future 
ance export mvkets, on 
which the producers 
depend, are weak. 

Low grain prices 
provided a silver lining for 
Virginia broiler, turkey, 
^g, swine, and dairy in- 
dustries which rely heavily 
on grain from other states. 
It is a short-lived 
blessing Tech agricultural 
economists said, since 
Uvestock producers will be 
faced with lower grain 
production and higher 
costs in the future. 

Tech agricultural 
economist Wayne Purcdl 
casts gloom for beef and 
hog producers. 

"Beef cattle producers 
will stay in trouble in 1983 
and hog producers will be 
in trouble." 

The state dairymen 
could face rough times if 
the federal government is 
successful in implemen- 
ting levees to, in effect, 
reduce price supports, said 
Tech Extension farm 
management specialist 
Roberi K. Reynolds. 

"Ifthe two SO-c«it milk 
tax payments are imposed, 
1 expect to see a number of 
dairymen sell off assets 
this year." 

Tobacco producers fear 
the future holds a down- 
trend in per capita con- 
sumption of tobacco, 
strong competition from 
ovoseas and an increase 
in tobacco excises which 



could cause a (fecrease in 
demand. 

Tech agricultural 
eccMiomist L. Lron Geyer 
said the recession will 
likely force many farmers 
to work "smarter." 

"One positive aspe^ of 
the recession may be to 
encourage mmt producers 
to contract price their 
producu," said Gorer. 

The fact that many 
Virginia farmers have 
diversified farm incomes 
helps blunt the effecu of 
the recession, said Geyer. 
Those who lose money on 
one commodity may be 
able to make money on 
another. 

The greatest asset many 
Virginia farmers have 
during the recession is off- 
farm income. Virginia 
farms on the average are 
smaller than the national 
mean and there is a large 
percentage of part-time 
farmers. So, while farm 
income plummets, off- 
farm income can keep 
many farmers in Umbo un- 
til better times. 

"Generally, in times 
like these producers who 
are farming marginal land 
located far from markets 
are those who face ruin, 
like the Okies of the 
I920's." said Geyer. 

While Virginia farmers 
generally escape this 
description, Geyer said 
individuals will still face 
the prospect of giving up 
farming. Not only poor 
managers will drop out, 
said Geyer, but good 
managers who are victims 
of unforeseen changes in 
the market which turned 
out to be devastating un- 
det their personal circum- 
stances. 

"In the 1920's, it was 
some of the best farmers 
who were wiped out." 



Agriculture Week 7 



Exports Up, Volume Down 



U.S. Agricultural ex- 
ports are expected to total 
about $40.5 billion for 
fiscal 1982. That's an 
eight percent drop from 
the $43.8 billioo volume in 
1981 and the first decline 
^ce 1969. 

The fiscal year runs 
from Oct. 1 to Sept. 30. 

Meanwhile, the physi- 
cal volume of exports 
continues to climb and the 
early count suggests 
165 million metric tons <rf 
agricultural products were 
shipped in fiscal 1982. 
This is a record vdunK 
but not a big jump from 
1981. 

When higher volume 
generates fewer dollars, it 
means prias are lower. 
This was the situation in 



1982. Agricultural prices 
were not high going into 
\9%1 and prices of several 
commodities continued to 
fall throughout the year. 

High levels of i^oduc- 
tion have been the rule 
rather than the exception 
for many commodities 
during the past two years. 
When demand is not ex- 
panding, the only way to 
move more production 
through commercial chan- 
nels is with lower prias. 

Another factor is weak 
conditions in the world 
ecOTomy that have re- 
stricted demand for U.S. 
agricultural exporu. High 
unemployment rates in 
several countries are re- 
straining consumption. 



especially ot meats. 2>o a 
drop in livestock feeding 
hit U.S. feed grain exports 
which were down 10 per- 
cent. 

Ibe American dollar 
grew stronger on foreign 
markeu, especially dur- 
ing the summer. The 
gains of the dollar against 
foreign currency during 
the year made U.S. goods 
more expensive to foreign 
buyers. 

While exports were off 
somewhat in value, agri- 
cukural tr«ie continued to 
be an important coitri- 
butOT to the U.S. balance 
of trade in 1982. Agri- 
cuhural impcHis also drop- 
ped more than $2 billioi 
during the year. 



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8 Agriculture Week 



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molted suggest that the average age of the flock is older 
and that producers are keeping their hens longer." 

Ruszler said natiooal authoities are predicting that 
production through July may be down slightly and, if 
there are signs (tf an economic recovery, that the output 
may increase toward the end of the year. 

Basing his figures on New York market quotations, 
he predicted that if |»roducers keep their outputs near 
1982 levels, 1983 egg ptkcs may average between 67 
and 73 cents, near last year's 70.8 cents. 

Hie specialist noted that the 1982 average wu half a 
cent below 1980 prices. 



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Cattle Prices Not 
Much Improved 



Wginia cattle producers suffered four disappoint- 
ments for every pleasant surprise they received during 
1982. 

K.C. Williamson, Virginia Tech Extension animal 
scientist, said costs continued to rise during the year 
but at a slower rate than in previcHis years. Prices 
received by most producers were described as only 
slightly improved over 1981. 

"This adds up to two very mediocre years in a row fa- 
most Virginia cattlemen," Williamson said. 

Feeder calves and yearlings, the product for most 
Virginia farmers, saw early 1982 prices that were below 
the level of a year earlier. By April 1982, Hnished cattle 
prices reached $69 per hundredweight and "it looked 
as though they surely would bring $73 in only a matter 
of weeks. 

"Fed cattle did average $72 in May. Cattle feeders, 
with high interest rates and the pessimism that 
prevailed at the time, failed to get excited about 
bidding up the prices of feeder cattle even though they 
were making a profit on fed cattle being marketed," 
Williamson said. 

Yearling steers sold during the special spring feeder 
cattle sales in April had an average weight of 644 
pcHinds and averaged $6S. This was about two dollars 
per hundred below the average price of steers at the 
1981 spring sales. 

The conservative attitude of cattle feeders proved to 
be a wise one, Williamson s^, as fed cattle prices 
dipped lower during the faU. At times in OctdTer and 
l*>vember, choice fed steers were selling well below 
$60 per hundredweight. Some went as low as $55. 
" The Extension spedalist said, "The lower fed cattle 
prices during the fall dealt at unkind blow to Virginia 
feeder cattle producers as the prices of feeder cattle 
moved lower in sympathy with lower fed cattle prices. 
Jhis lower price trend took on even greater insignifi- 
cance when one considers that 75 percent or more of 
Virginia feeder cattle are sold during the fall." 

Steer calves sold through the special fall feeder sales 
averaged $64.24 per hundred. This was one ddlar per 
hundred or about five dollars per head mwc than the 
previcms year. Heifer calves sdd through special sales 
averaged $51 per hundredweight in 1982, about the 
same as in 1981. 

Since there was a slightly lower average selling 
weight in 1582, the gross return per calf sold in the fall 
of 1982 was $280.50 per head, the same as in 1981 . This 
did not cover total production costs fa- most calf 
producers in the state. 

The same cost-price relationship must prevail 
throughout most of the nation sina the U.S. 
Department (rf Agriculture inventory of cattle numbers 
on farms last July I suggested total cattle numbers are 
not increasing and beef cow numbers even may be 
decUning slightly. 

The traditional 10-year cattle cycle suggested that 
cattle numbers would increase between 1980 and 1985. 

Williamson said that the final 1982 reports are 
expected to show that beef cow and total cattfc numbers 
were reduced in 1%2. 

"Hiis wiH be fiurly good evidence that the peak in 
cattle numbers which was expected in 1985 will be 
smaller than expected and that tte peak even may be 
postpcmd tea later date. Depending upon the extent (rf 
those reduced numbers and if there is some 
improvement in demand, there caaM be some increase 
in cattfe prkes in 1983 and 1984," Williamson said. 



Minor Bulbs Are Harbingers 
Of Spring — _ — __ 



Agriculture Week 9 



byDUNERELF 
Vb^Bla Teck ExtaHiM Ha 



(HMttmltwisl 



Despite the late start of winter this year, many of us 
are looking longingly toward spring and take deUgbt in 
those first few tigiu of its eventual arrival. For those 
already fiuniliar wth the minor bulbs, renewed fidth in 
warmer weather is probably u dose as a rock waU or a 
raised bed around the house. 

For those who would Uke to make acqtiaintance with 
these littk flowers, there are a half dCBen or so that it 
would be well worth watdiing for over the next few 
weeb. These indude: 

ChronodoRa or glory of tlK soow-TIv informal starry 
flowers of vivid blue, shady to white in the center, are 
borne in diuters of eight or more oo a stem readiing 



three to six inches in height. Oiroaodoxa naturalize 
easily and make lovely cut flowers. 

Winter-acooite-lhe bright yellow flowers on this 
four-iiKh tall plant resenbte a small buttercup, 
blooming as early as January. Planted in a raised bed. 
in a rock garden or atop a stone wall, they are easily 
seen without stooping. Ihey also naturalize well on 
southern banks with dedduous trees to provide 
summer shade. 

Snowdrops or galanthus~The six-indi tall blooms are 

pure white with green spots. Ihese solitary, droo|mig 

blossoms appear fiagile but will withstand frost, snow, 

and ice and may bloom as early as January. Snowdrops 
See Bulbi, pa^ 12 




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10 Agriculture Week 



March 20-26 

Why An Agriculture Week? 



Virginia Agr i 



This year, March 20-26. will mark the 8th observance 
of Virginia Agriculture Week. Governor Charles S. 
Robb will be serving as Honorary Chairman of the an- 
nual event that calls attention to the first, and largest 
industry in Virginia that has in so many ways con- 
tributed to the quality of life for each of us. 

The original idea for such a celebration came from 
the Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services in 1976 
during the country's Bicentennial observance. The first 
theme was "Freedom's Roots-Agriculture." 

In 1977 the theme of the event called attention to the 
work of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer 



18.5 Million Pounds 
Produced Daily 

For each day in 1982 Virginia Farm production averaged: 

2.S million eggs 

2,560,000 quarts of milk 

1,617,880 pounds of broilers 

1 ,443,800 pounds of cattle and calves 

1 , 1 78, 1 00 pounds of apples 

754,800 pounds of peanuts 

547,900 pounds of hogs 

339,300 pounds of tobacco 

493 ,200 pounds of turkeys 

74,000 pounds of peaches 

6, 100 pounds of potatoes 

328,200 pounds of tomatoes 

900 pounds of sweet potatoes 

171,200 bushels of corn for grain 

5 1 ,000 bushels of soybeans 

38,500 bushels of wheat 

4,590 tons of hay 

That totals over 18.5 million pounds of production 
per day. 

One U.S. farm worker today supplies enough food 
and fiber fur 78 people. In 1930 the number was only 
10. 



Attention: 
Small Farmers 



The Virginia Beach De- 
partment of Agriculdture - 
Cooperative Extension 
Service is in the process of 
updating their mailing list 
for small farmers. Anyone 
wishing to receive educa- 
tional information relative 
to small farms in the City 



of Virginia Beach that is 
not currently listed on the 
mailing list should ccmtact 
the Virginia Beach De- 
partment of Agriculture at 
the Municipal Center by 
March 11 and give their 
name and address so that 
they can be included on 
the list. 




Services as that sute agency celebrated its lOMh birth- 
day, A Century of Progress. 

Other themes over the years have included: Virginia - 
Where Agriculture Works, Agriculture A Reason For 
Giving Thanks, Virginia Agriculture-More For Your 
Money. 

In Recent years the week of the celebration also in- 
cludes National Agriculture Day, this year March 21. 
Since 1981 the people of the United States are called 
upon to observe the day with appropriate ceremonies 
and activities in recognition of the nation's "most basic 
industry." 




5. T.Moore Jr. 



It Helps To Know Your 
Efforts Are Recognized 



irginia Agriculture Week 



"I am pleased to see the 
efforu of those involved 
in agriculture recognized 
through activities 
promoted by Virginia's 
Agriculture Week" said 
S.T. Moore Jr., of South 
Hill, president of the 
Virginia Farm Bureau 
Federation. 

Moore, referring to the 
week of March 20-26, 
notes that the agricultural 
community hasn't had it 
too easy here of late. 
"Sometimes", Moore 
stated, "it helps to know 
that your efforts are 
recognized." 

Virginia Farm Bureau 
numbers almost 80,000 
member families in 87 
county Farm Bureau 
organizations. In 1982, 
Virginia ranked at the top 
in terms of membership 
gain for the larger states, 
as part of the American 
Farm Bureau. Only two 
states, much smaller in 
size, achieved a higher 
percentage of member in- 
crease. 

"This membership gain 
shows that farmers are 



concerned about their in- 
dustry" Moore said. Farm 
Bureau is a grassroots 
organization with volun- 
tary leadership starting at 
the county level. "These 
county leaders are backed 
by staff personnel at 
both the state and national 
level" More said. "It is a 
team effort that gets the 
job done," Moore con- 
tinued. 

Agriculture in the state 
has had it rough the last 
few years with high inter- 
est rates, double digit in- 
flation and other factors 
affecting the cost of inputs 
such as equipment, seed, 
fertilizer and chemicals. 
"With interest rates 
coming down and in- 
flatipn seemingly under 
control for now" More 
says, "maybe we can get 
the economy turned 
around." 

Noting the state of the 
agricultural economy in 
the country, Moore said 
"production costs, must 
either go down, or the 
prices received must go up' 
or many farmers will be 
bankrupt." 




CERTIFICATE o; 



By virtue of the authority i 
in the Governor of the Cod 

there is hereby offic 

Virginia Agriculture Week and \ 

1983 

Virginia agriculture contribui 
Commonwealth in terms of food and f 
materials for manufacturing industf 
domestic and overseas markets, and 
in our state who depend on agr1cul1 

It IS IMPORTANT THAT THE CU\2 
AGRICULTURE PROVIDED THE FOUNDATfp^ 
AND THAT THIS INDUSTRY CONTINUES TC 
AND DEVELOPMENT, 

For THE PURPOSE OF EMPHASIZING 
AGRICULTURE AND RECOGNFZING THE HA^ 
INDUSTRY, THE PERIOD OP flARCH 20-2E 

Virginia Agriculture Week, INCLW)I^ 
Day. 




^^^mmmimm 



mn 



Agriculture Week 11 



icultureWeek 




RECOQMTIQN 

nested by the Constitution 
nmonwealth of Virginia,^ 
ially recognized: 
/iRGiNiA Agriculture Day 



FES SUBSTANTIALLY TO THE 
MBER FOR ITS CITIZENS, RAW 
ilES, VALUABLE PRODUCTS FOR 
JOBS FOR THE MANY THOUSANDS 
rURE FOR EMPLOYMENT. 

:ens OF Virginia be aware that 

I UPON WHICH OUR STATE WAS BUILT 
) BE A MAJOR FORCE IN ITS GROWTH 

; THE IMPORTANCE OF VIRGINIA 
lY INDIVIDUALS WHO WORK IN THIS 
h 1983, HAS BEEN SET ASIDE AS 

iG March 21 as National Agriculture 



/<J2i35L 



Arbor Day Proclamation 

^•Kjowttux Charles S. Robb has proclaimed Friday, 
March 1 1 as Arbor Dav. 

"Although it isn't a legal holiday, it is a very 
impotant day~a day to pause and pay tribute to the 
trees," said W.F. Custard, State Forester, Virginia 
Divisioi of Forestry, Elepartment of Conservation and 
Eccmomic Development. 

It is a day during which youth and adults throughout 
the State conduct programs and participate in memorial 
tree planting ceremonies. 

According to Custard, the Commonwealth's 16'/j 
million acres of forestland provides raw material for the 
forest products industry~an industry that employs (me 
out of six wage earners and craitributes IV* billion 
ddlars a year to our State's economy. 

A tree means many things besides supporting a 
multibillion-ddlar-a-yearbusinsess. It provides shade, 
fruits and nuts. It provides fuel, lumber and raw 
material for fwper. It Helps hold the soil in place and 
provides a home for wildlife. 

"Even thcu^h Virginians plant nuUions (rf forest 
trees each year to retoest idle, eroded and harvested 
lands. Arbor Day is a time for everyooe-dty and 
country dwellers idike. It is a time to plant a uee or 
shrub in recsgnkioii of what the forests have meant to 
our fwe fathers and what they will mean to future 
generations," Qistard saUI. 

"Governor Robb has set aside this special day in 

1983 in d»ervance of Arbor Day. Let us all stare this 

day with him by taking part in a tree-planting ceremony 

on courthouse, or school grounds, pubUc parks or even 

- in our own front yard," concluded Custard. 



Agriculture 



Virginia's Largest Industry! 



Agriculture is Virginia's largest industry. In 1982, $17 
billion of direct and indirect economic activity was 
generated by the total agribusiness industry in the 
production of food and fiber. This, represents 33 percent 
of total economic activity in the State, and 368,000 jobs 
or 15 percent of total jobs in the State. 

Over 2 billion dollars worth of agricultural products 
move through Virginia ports annually. (Of this amount, 
approximately $278 million are Virginia farm products). 
Two out of every 5 acres of Virginia's major crops go to 
exports. 




Profile 



The Virginia Farmer 



A statistical comparison 
of Virginia farmers with 
their national counter- 
parts indicates the former 
has higher ownership of 
land, works a little more 
off the farm and is a bit 
dder. 

The most recently com- 
piled census of agriculture 
for Virginia indicated 62 
percent of the state's 
56,869 farm operators 
own the land they wtxk. 
The census, uken every 
four years by the Census 
Bureau, was completed 
fat 1982 in January. The 
national average of 
ownership is 59 percent. 

Twenty-seven percent 
of Virginia farmers are 
part owners-operators 
who both own and rent 
land-and 11 percent are 
tenants. 

The number of Virginia 
farms has declined about 
12 percent during the nine 
years between J 969 and 
1978, going from 64,572 to 
56,869. However, the 
•figures are not directly 
comparable due to im- 
proved methods of data 
collection in the latter 
census ami a change in 
the definition of a farm. 

Looking at work off the 
farm, the most recent 
census data shows that 40 
percent of the Virginians 



were employed 200 or 
more days off their places 
in the census year, as 
compared with a U.S. 
average of 37 percent. 47 
percent of Virginia farm- 
ers, as compared with the 
U.S. average of 54 per- 
cent, gave their principal 
occupation as farming. 

From an age stand- 
pCMnt, the average Vir- 
ginia farmer is 52.3 years, 
compared with the U.S. 
average of 50. 1 . Srane 22 
percent of the Virginians 
were over 65, and only !.■* 
percent under 35. 

The average size of a 
Virginia farm is 175 acres, 
compared with 415 acres 
for the nation. Seventy- 
eight percent of the 
state's farms are under 
220 acres. 

Virginia has about 10 
million acres of farmland, 
of which 2.7 million are in 
harvested cropland. Only 
43,900 acres are irrigated, 
less than one percent of 
tiie total cropland. 

Virginia's value of farm 
products sold reached 
$1.3 billion in 1978. with a 
per farm average nf 
$22,933, well below the 
U.S. average <rf $43,618. 
The value of land and 
buildings per acrfc was 
reported at $930, about 50 
percent more than the 
natioial average of $628. 



These statistics become even more astounding when 
you realize that it all starts at the farm where less than 2 
percent of the population of the Old Dominion works 
on 39 percent of the land area. There are 85,000 full- 
time equivalent farm workers on Virginia's 60,000 far- 
ms. 

The average size farm is 163 acres. 

Average value per farm (land and buildings) 
$169,000. 

The 1982 estimated total gross income: $1.9 billion. 

The 1982 estimated total farm production expenses: 
$1.8 billion. 



Production 


1 

Top Counties 


Virginia's 


Virginia agriculture is 


diversified and in all corners ol 


the state. 




Counties where you'll find the most: | 


Farms 


Washington 


Land in Farms 


Augusta 


Apples 


Frederick 


Barley 


Northampton 


Bees 


Rockingham 


Broilers 


Rockingham 


Cabbage 


Carroll 


Cattle (All) 


Rockingham 


Corn Production 


Loudoun 


Cantaloupe 


Hanover 


Cucumbers 


Northampton 


Dairy (Cows) 


Rockingham 

Rockingham ^ 


Eggs 


Goats (Milk) 


Loudoun 


Grapes 


Fauquier 


Hogs and Pigs 


Virginia Beach 


Horses (On Farm) 


Albermarle 


Milk (Production) 


Rockingham 


Mules 


Halifax 


Oats 


Frederick 


Peaches 


Frederick 


Peanuts 


Southampton 


Potatoes (Irish) 


Northampton 


Pumpkins 


New Kent 


Sheep and Lambs 


Augusta 


Snap Beans 


Northampion 


Soybeans 


Accomack 


Strawberries 


Bedford 


Sweet Potatoes 


Accomack 


Tobacco 


Piiisylvaiiia 


Tomatoes 


Northampion 


Turkeys 


Rockingham 


Watermelon 


Soulhampioii 


Wheat, Winter 


Chesapeake CiiN 



\ 




Vkgrna AgrJcHltare Week 



i 



"^ 



^ 



12 Agriculture Week 



Bulb, continued from iMige 9 

prefer a heavy soil and so well in deciduous shade 
where they look best in clunips or naturalized along 
with an evergreen groundcover. 

Spring snowflakes or leucojum-Following the snow- 
drops in bloem, these are similar but larger and taller, 
6-12 inches in height. Best planted in the sun. these will 
bloom as early as February. Two other Icucojums, the 
summer snowflake and autumn snowflake, are abo 
attractive for later season bloonis. 

Grape hyacinth or muscari-^Thete are among the 
most commonly found o! the small bulbs, brobably 
because they spread so freely and persist without 
cultivation for many years. Because at the large 
number (rf different spedes, jnitacari may bloom from 
early March to June. Rarely over six inches tall, the 
spires of deep blue bell-shaped flowers are the most 
frequently seen. But others have light blue and white 
blossoms. All wiU thrive in almost any well-drained soil 
in fUU sun or oartial shade. 



Netted iris (iris reticulata)~One of the earliest iris 
usually blooming in late March, the flowers are up to 
SIX mches taU. Ughtly scented, the most common are 
violet-purple; however, white and blue cultivan are 
available. ITjese arc exceUent addiUons to rock gardens 
and sunny borders. 

All <rf these bulbs are hardy and require no ten<ter 
bndness. Hiey prefer a location with good drainage 
and thrive m hot, dry summers. Arock garden or raised 
bed offers protection frcbi acddeittsuid enhanced 
visibility u weU as optimum culturai Conditions. For 
earliest color, they sh<wld be planted fiKing south with 
protection from north winds. 

After selecting yoitf fiivorttes from thcM you 
encounter in public and private gardens this spring, 
mark your calender for an early SeptemtMr day to buy 
and idant a donn or more of those little beauties »o 
spring can stirt early in your garden. 




»««»s» 



^^ 



Buy any new Ford 
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Door Opens 

On Peanut Profits 



Virginia peanut growers can save as much as $150 
per acre if tliey will only lay down their "shotguns," 
says a ^%ginia Tech Extension specialist. 

"bi the past, fivmers have used the 'shotgun* 
an»oadi to production." explained Allen H. Allison, 
peanut spedalist at Tedi's Tidewater Reseaidi Center. 
"Ihey've used everything in the book to produce a crop 
aiKl it's been a very expcDsivc practkx." 

By using the prvscription-type appit»di to produc- 
don, ftrmers can save up to $130 per wre. "TUi is a 
very coounoo-sense approach," AUisoo said. "You use 
what is needed, but no more." 

The Tech specialist also revealed dut at least 90 
perceitt of >%ginia's growers can cut $100 in iMroduction 
costs from each acre without affecting yteld or 
decreasing profit. 

Pfoduc^ioa cost savings are important with a crop 
sudi as peanuts where production costs are extremely 
high-between $700-$750 per acre compared to com or 
soybeans where OKts arc between $20O-$2SO per acre. 
"Peanuts are such a costly crop because they are 
grown underground and are subjected to more diseases 
and insect damage," noted Allison. "The drying and 
curing process is also very costly." 

Although peanut production in Virginia is limited to 
eight major producting areas (the counties of Isle of 
Wight, Surry, Prince Gcwge, Sussex, Dinwiddie, 
Southampton, Oeensville and the Qty of Suffolk), it 
represents a major field crop in the state, ranldng 
seventh in terms of cash receipts. 

Virginia farmers receive about $95 million annually 
for growing peanuts. Processing ccmplexes throughout 
the state ccmtribute another $200 milliwi to the state's 
econwny. Suffdlc is one of the largest peanut 
processing cities in the United States. 

"Virginia's 5,000 peanut growers rank fifth natioi- 
ally in production," Allison noted, "and they produce a 
tqj-quality product." Virginia farmers raise the 
Virginia-type peanut, the larget in size of any grown. 
For this reason, they are used less for peanut butter or 
peanut oil. 

Also known as the "ball-park" type peanut, Virginia 
peanuts are mainly marketed raw, salted, salted in the 
shell and roasted in the shell. Some of the kernels are 
used in premium-grade cocktail peanuts. 

"A depressed world economic situaticwi tends to 
depress consumption of peanuts," Allison said, 
"especially in the U.S. where peanuts are thought of as 
a snack food or luxury item instead of a highly-nutri- 
tious food as they arc thought of in foreign countries." 
ApiwQximately one-third of the Virginia peanut crop is 
exported to Western Europe where the in-shell roasted 
beanut is ixwular. 

Allison predicted a bright future for peanut farmers 
provided that growers naticmally will hold production 
steady so that the supply/demand situation can be kept *" 
m line. Virginia farmers reduced acreage 8.8 percent in 
1981 because of a surplus. 

"Oowers had a pretty good year in 1982 and prices 
were excellem," he said. "The $550 per ton support 
priM aUowed fanners with high yields (upwards to 
4,000 pounds per acre) to make a reasonable profit. 

At the same time, Allisrai cautioned growers to hdd 
production levels steady. "TUe peanut farmer also 
grows com, soybeans and grain," he noted. "Because 
the peanut part of his operation was the cmly area he 
made money on last year, there will be a tendency to 
plant more paanuts in '83. tastead, production should 
be held steady or even reduced." 




«p 



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it 



1983 
Forecast 

Steady'* 



Agriculture Week 13 



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Hardwood Production Steady 



Despite the fact that the wood producu industry has 

been experiencing bad times in recent years, Virginia 

hardwood producers have maintained a steady rate of 

.production. State softwood producers, however, have 

noted a softness in the demand for their products. 

About 60 percent of Virginia's lumber production is 
in hardwoods with softwoods making up the remaining 
40 percent. 

Marshall S. White, Virginia Tech Extension wood 
products specialists, noted that Virginia, unlite many 
states, has alarge number of producers on private land 
who regulate their output so that there will be no glut 
on the market. 

Nationally, the perfonnance of the wood products 
industry during the fint eight months of 1982 was poor. 
There were only l.i million housing starts, the same 
number as in 1981. Continued high interest rates and 
uncertainty in the economy hurt the industry. 

Southern pine prices were up slightly, but production 
was down 10 percent. Total softwood production, 
shipments and orders received all declined by 12 
percent. 

Hardwood production was down 29 percent. Ship- 
ments and orders received were down 23 and 25 
percent, respcrtively. 

New orders for furniture were down 20 percent while 
production of paper and board declined six percent. 

Stumpage prices for yellow pme dropped and the 
vdume was down 18 percent nationally. 

"Virginia, however, has not been as hard hit as a 
number of states," White said, "as the producers make 
a concentrated effort to meet the demand." 

Virginia Christmas tree grower in 1982 harvested an 
estimated 170,000 trees valued at approximately $1.5 
millicm. 

For 1983, projected housing starts are 1.3 million 
units, up only 18 percent from the 1982 level. Helping 
this comeback should be new orders for replenishing 
inveiitories which declined last year to very low levels. 




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7 



14 Agriculture Week 




W 



\ Virginia Agriculture 
Week Recipies 



Hrpu liriaiat iHl 

The bounty of Virginia agriculture 
can be most appreciated at one's own 
table. Therefore, these recipies were 
especially selected by Virginia Depar- 
tment of Agriculture and Consumer 
Services' Home Economists to celebrate 
Virginia Agriculture Week, 1 983. 

BRUNSWICK STEW 

2 large fryers, cut up 1_^ 
Water 

3 large onions, chopped 

4 medium potatoes, peeled and diced 
2 10-ounce packages frozen corn 

2 28-ounce cans whole tomatoes with juice 

2 sticks butter 

8-ounce bottle chili sauce 

Worcestershire sauce 

Hot pepper sauce 

Salt and pepper 

Place chicken in large stock pot or Dutch oven. Cover 
with water. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer 1 hour. 
Measure and reserve 1 quart stock. Bone cooked 
chicken and cut into small pieces. Return chicken to pot 
with stock, onions, potatoes, corn, tomatoes, butter 
and chili sauce. Cover and simmer 3 hours stirring oc- 
casionally. Season to taste with remaining ingredients. 
Makes 12 servings. 

BEEFSTROGANOFF 

1 '/j pounds boneless sirloin of rib steak 

2 tablespoons butter 
1 cut chopped onion 

1 cup sliced mushrooms 

2 cups sour cream 

2 tablespoons tomato paste 
2 tablespoons flour 
1 teaspoon sail 
Vi teaspoon pepper 

Cut beef into W-inch thick slices. In large skillet over 
medium-high heat, melt butter and saute onions and 
mushrooms. Add beef and stir until browned. Reduce 
heat to low. Combine remaining ingredients and blend 
well. Add to skillet and stir gently to mix. Let heat 
through, about 5 minutes, then serve over noodles. Ser- 
ves 6. 

PEANUT RICE SALAD 

5-ounce package long grain and wild rice mixture 

A cup mayonnaise 

V* cup plain yogurt 

1 cup chopped celery 

1 cup tomato cubes 

'/i cup diced cucumber 

2 tablespoons chopped parsley 
1/8 teaspoon seasoned salt 
1/8 teaspoon pepper 

y* cup roasted peanuts 

Omitting butter, cook rice according to package instruc- 
tions. Mix all ingredients except peanuts. Chill. Sprinkle 
with peanuts before serving. Serve within 24 hours. Ser- 
ves 4-6 



SWEET POTATO BISCUITS with BUTTER 

4 tablespoons sugar 

4 tablespoons shortening 

1 V* cups cooked, mashed sweet potatoes 

IVi cups flour 

4 teupooos bttking powder 
Vi teaspobn salt 

Mix together sugar, shortening and sweet potatoes. Sift 
tOfethiH' dry ingredients. Add dry ingredients to sweet 
potato mixture and cut in with two knives or pastry 
blender until uniform consistency. Turn onto floured 
suface and knead lightly. Roll to ■/2-inch thickness and 
cut into biscuits. Place on baking sheet and bake at 423 
degrees for IS minutes or until lightly browned. 
HONEY BUTTER: Cream 1 stick butter until fluffy. 
With mixer running gradually add 'A cup honey. Makes 
Icup. 

CRUSTLESS CUSTARD PIE 
13-ounce can evaporated mild 

5 eggs 

Vi cup sugar 

3 tablespoons butter, melted 
2 tablespoons flour 
1 teaspoon vanilla 

V4 teaspoon nutmeg 
Whipped cream 

Grease and flour a 9-inch pie plate. Put all ingredients 
into blender except whipped cream. Blend 30 seconds. 
Scrape down sides of blender. Blend until smooth, 
about 1 minute. Pour into pie plate and bake at 350 
degrees for 40 minutes or until knife inserted near center 
comes out clean. Serve with whipped cream. Serves 6-8. 

STIR-FRY PORK AND PEACHES 

1 ^ pound boneless pork loin roast 

2 tablespoons soy sauce 
1 teaspoon soybean oil 

1 tablespoon cornstarch 

V* cup soybean oil 

16-ounce can sliced peaches, drain and reserve liquid 

1 Vi teaspoons cornstarch 

Qit pork into '/4-inch thick slices. Combine pock, soy 
sauce, 1 teaspoon oil and 1 tablespoon cornstarch m 
bowl and let marinate for 15 minutes. Heat oil in wok or 
skillet over high heat. Add pork and fry, stirring, 3 to 4 
minutes. Pour off oil. Reduce heat to medium. Add 
peaches. Stir and let simmer. Dissolve remaining cor- 
nstarch in reserved peach liquid. Add to skillet and stir 
until thickened. Serve with rice. Serves 5. 

LAMB RIBLETS WITH APPLES 

1 Vi-2 pound breast of lamb, cut in riblets 
Salt and pepper 

2 tablespoons sugar 

2 tablespoons lemon juice 

2 tablespopns butter 

1 pound apples, peeled, cored and quartered 

Arrange ribs in a shallow baking dish. Sprinkle with salt 
and pepper. Bake at 400 degr«»s for 30 minutes. Com- 
bine sugar, lemon juice and butter in a saucepan. Cook, 
over medium heat until butter is melted. Arrange appl« 
around ribs and brush all with lemon glaze. Bake at 350 
degrees for 45 minutes or until ribs are tender. Serves 3- 
4. 



Virginia's Horse Industry 



— Virginia's heriuee with horses is part of her image 
and is a multi-million dollar industry as well. 

The annual gross value of the ho-se industry in the 
state amounts to S322 million when the value <rf the 
several aspects <rf the industry are looked at t(«ether, 
said Arden N. Huff, Virginia Tech Extension animal 
scientist. 

TTie figure was reported after an industry-wide 
inventwy conducted from 1979 to 1981 by the Virginia 
Cooperative Extension Service. 

TTie hwse industry includes over 36,000 individuals 



whoown horses, ponies, mules or donkeys. There are 
about 86,000 horses. Over 6,600 persons were 
emplt^ed in aspects such as tack and equipment sates, 
as well as the fiums, schools and stables. There are 
1,200 breeding farms in the state and the industry 
produces a total annual income of S70 million, the 
report showed. 

"The economic rondition has placed many farms and 
(wners in very difficult conditions, like it has to all 
agricultural industries," said Huff, "ttowever, interest 
in horses and the quality of horses will ccxiiinue to 
increase." 



Farm Depression 
Hurts Nations — 
Industry 

DefH-essed fium prices 
and low former ivofits 
dcn't only hurt fiarmen, 
they also hurt the rest of 
the natioa's economy, and 
can cost urban industrus 
billions. 

Farmers are the sii^te 
largest group of purdni- 
ers in the mttion, stimultt- 
ing all businss, from 
banks to steel mills. 

When prices are adjust- 
ed for inflation. Gum 
prices are at their lowest 
since 1934. That means 
formers can't afford new 
equipment, and must 
make do with repairs in- 
stead. That's bad news for 
the U.S. Steel industry, 
which earmarks over five 
percent of its production 
for agricultural equipment 
and building materials 
each year. 



Other items on the 
annual agricultural shopp- 
ing list include: 

•$13.7 billioa wprth of 
fuel and lubricants. 

•Nearly $12 billion 
worth of ma^inery. 

•Over $20 WUioa worth 
of feed and seed, pibu 
$6.7 WIIioD worth at ferti- 
lizer and yme. 

•About 33 trillion kOo- 
watt-hours of etectridty, 
which could light tbt 
homes in New England, 
Maryland, Kentucky and 
Washington. 

Significant purchase 
losses in any of these 
areas affect jobs nation- 
wide. And none of this 
takes into account the 
more than $4 billion 
farmers pay in real estate 
and property taxes each 
year. 



Farm Land Disappearing 



Farm land is continuing 
to disappear in the United 
States according to 
Virginia Tech Extension 
agricultural economists. 

Daily, four square miles 
are shifted to uses other 
than agriculture in the 
United Sutes. 

In the war between the 
bulldozer and the plow, 
one million acres of 
America's prime farm 
land are urbanized each 



year. A million acres 
equals a one-half mile 
wide strip from New York 
to California. 

In addition to the prime 
farm land being lost, the 
nation annually is losing 
another two million acres 
of lesser quality agricul- 
tural land to non-agricul- 
tural uses. The total an- 
nual loss of three million 
acres a year is the 
equivalent of 320 acres an 
hour. 



Sweet Potato Growers Guide 



Fdlowing is the name, 
address and telephone 
number of sweet potato 
growers in the City of 
Virginia Beach. All grow- 
ers sell both wholesale 
and retail. Orders can be 
pliuxd by calling them at 
the numbers given. 

Steve Barnes Farm 
1 100 McQanan Lane 
Va. Beach VA 23456 
426-2241 

G.C. Gentress and Son 
1680 Princess Anne Rd. 
Va. Beach, VA 23456 



David Flanagan Farm 
1707 Princess Anne Rd. 
Va. Beach, VA 23456 
426-7322 or 426-2803 



Wafter and Doug 
Munden Farm 
Va. Beach, VA 23457 
426-2742 



E.L Robinson 
1560 N. Muddy Oeek 
. Road 

Va. Beach, VA 23456 
426-6492 



V. B. Farmers Market 
Gets Parking Area 



E. R. Cockrell, Jr., 
Dir«:tor of the Virginia 
Beach Department of 
Agriculture announced 
recently that the Farmer's 
Market will have increased 
parking facilicies before 
ihe peak marketing season 
of the summer. 

City Council approved 
$55,000 in C.I. P. budjiei 
for the expansion. 
Cockrell estimates thai 



approximately fifty (50) 
additional spaces will be 
made available by June. 

Cockrell said that the 
extra spaces will be for 
customers and increased 
spaces for farmers who 
sell from their trucks. 
"This has been one of our 
objectives for several 
years. I am quite pleased 
that Council has 
authorized this expan- 
sion," said Cockrell. 





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Hog Prices May Be Good 

Virginia hog producers should get good prices when 
they take their hogs to market in 1983. 

That's the opinion erf' many agricultural marketing 
specialists. 

Charles R. Cooper, Virginia Tech Extension swine 
specialist, said recent U.S. Department of Agriculture 
figures show that nationwide, there are about 41.9 
million hogs and pigs on farms. This is the lowest 
inventory level since 1973. Hogs kept for breeding and 
for market also haVe been reduced, by seven and nine 
percent, respectively. 

"These figures clearly suggest that pork supplies will 
continue to be limited for consumers in at least the first 
half of 1983 and that actual expansion is not yet under 
way." 

in looking at Virginia, Cooper found support for the 
national figures. Breeding h(%s dropped from 91,000 in 
1981 to 83,000 in 1982. This was a nine percent decline. 

Market hogs declined 24 percent-from 349,000 to 
417,000. Total hog numbers were down 22 percent, 
from 640,000 in 1981 to 500.000 in 1982. 

Coc^r emphasized that complete figures for 1982 
are not yet available and cited figures which were 
compiled before year's end. However, he did not expect 
very much change. 

He said that the state's 9,000 producers received 
strong prices during the year. Prices per hundred- 
weight equaled or exceeded the SSO figure for most of 
the year. This was a far cry from 1973 record of $74 but 
still a profit. 

Cooper noted that the Virginia hog producers were 
assisted by the record com crop during the year. The 
corn surplus kept feed costs down which saved the 
producers money. 

Cooper noted that many experts believe hog prices 
may again exceed $60 per hundredweight at some point 
during the first part of 1983. Whether or not they will 
continue at that level will depend upoi whether or not 
producers begin to build their inventories. 

"We are in a four-year down cycle," Cooper said, 
"and most of us expect the numbers to bottom out 
sometime in 1983 and begin climbing again. 

"If that occurs, then there will be some decline in 
hog prices." he concluded. 



Agriculture Week 15 



Corn, continued from page 6 



In talking about the 
1982 corn crop, one 
Extension agent noted, 
"It seems like only a few 
years ago when we had a 
target of 100 bushels to an 
acre. I never thought I 
would see a year when the 
state average would reach 
that figure." 

However, unless mar- 
ket prices improve, the 
bountiful yields will not 
help the farmers make 
money on their corn 
CTops. Ciood management 
is a must but pricep will 
have to start rising in 1983 
if the economic situation 
is to improve, the 
specialists said. 

The formers may get 
some economic relief if 
the payment in kind pro- 
gram, supported by both 
President Ronald Reagan 
and agricuhure secretary 
John Block, is put into 
place. 




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16 Agriculture Week 

Peanut 
Munching * 
Month 

Virginians can cele- 
brate March, National 
Peanut Munching Month, 
by stocicing up on the 
state's third largest cash 
aop. The large-podded, 
Virginia-type peanut is 
known as "the peanut of 
gourmets," hence the 
1983 theme "Virginia 
Peanuts for the Discrimi- 
nating Muncher." 

What makes the Vir- 
ginia-type peanut "the 
peanut of gourmets?" Us 
large size, beauty, superb 
flavor and high nutritional 
value. Virginia ranks sec- 
ond in the nation in the 
production of this prem- 
ium peanut. In the fall of 
1982, Virginia's 3,000 
peanut farmers produced 
approximately 140,000 
tons, about eight percent 
of the country-'s total 
peanut supply. 

Agriculture 
Week 
Celebrated 
Every Week 



During the week of 
March 20-26 all Virginia 
will be celebrating 
Agricultural Week. We'll 
be doing the same in 
Virginia Beach. There is 
one difference; we 
celebrate Agriculture 
every week in our city. 

Agriculture is an impor- 
tant industry, so impor- 
tant that we have a Depar- 
tment of Agriculture. On 
behalf of our total depart- 
ment I wish to thank the 
people of Virginia Beach 
for allowing us the 
privilege of serving you in 
a variety of ways since 
1918. 

We as a total team have 
enjoyed knowing you and 
working with you in 
Agriculture, Horticulture, 
Family Resources, and 4- 
H. Through our many 
years together we've seen 
a lot of each other. The 
closeness we have enjoyed 
is akin to family. Just 
being so close to you gives 
us many special pleasures. 

We've received birth 
announcements, in- 
vitations to attend high 
school and college 
graduations, invitations to 
weddings, seen your sons 
and daughters graduate 
into your businesses. You 
have allowed us to be a 
part of you and for this we 
thank you. 

So, my hat is off to 
agriculture. Y^ are the 
strength of this land for 
the power of this great 
America flows through 
your veins tot keep us 
strong. Keep us that way. 



JBS. 



The Fear Of 
The Unknown 



Americans reportedly are the best group in the wwld 
in voluntarily and accurately paying their income taxes. 
Why then do many of us feel near panic when contacted 
by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for an audit? 

Much of this uncertainty can be attributed to a fear of 
the unknown, sometimes a lack of recqrds and a lack of 
knowledge regarding IRS procedures. Generally, only 
about one in SO returns are audited. Individuals who are 
in higher income brackets or who have more 
complicated tax returns are more likely to have their 
returns audited. 

For example, persons with incomes of more than 
$50,000 reportedly were audited during calendar year 

$10,000. 

We also find returns with unusual expenses may 
bring an audit. If you make $10,000 and give $3,500 to 
charities, you may want to furnish scxne evidence with 
your tax return to help prevent an audit. Tax shelters 
are another "red flag" for an examiner. 

Generally, those audited receive letters asking them 
to come to a certain office at a specific date and time. It 
most often is the IRS office closest to their residence. 
The letter will have various items listed and checked 
that they wish to have audited. 

Scnnetimes, a phcme call to the agent invdved is all 
that is needed. Y(»j can negotiate the time or date if 
there are ccmflicts. Occasionally, field audits are made 
at a home or business but this generally is with very 
complex returns. 

In preparing for an audit, y(Ni may want to review 
your records to see if there are deductions that you have 
overlooted. Look over your cancelled checks, date book 
and fonner tax returns to see if you have missed the 
obvicHis. Many persons understate their exemptions, 
particularly contributicwis to charities and interest paid 
on small accounts. 

If you have documentiuion fcM- the items in question, 
you probably don't need a tax professicmal with you. 
Whether it is a $50 or $3,000 item may dictate the 
hiring of help. If it is complex or if a professioial tax 
preparer did your return, you may feel more at ease in 
having expert assistance. 



Most pers(Mis come from the tax audit saying they 
were surprised how nice the IRS perscmnel treated 
them. If, however, you are unsatisfied with the auditw, 
ytxi can stop the interview and ask to see the supervises: 
about changing the auditor. 

Do not expect the IRS to be swayed by the alleged 
unfairness of tax laws, the underground market, or tax 
breaks of corporations. The IRS administers the law; it 
does not legislate it. 

If you disagree with the agent's decisicm, you can 
appeal to a.supervisor, through the IRS appeals office 
(X directly to vcmi. Contrary to pupular belief, there 
are no quotas imposed on audita- to cdlect a specified 
amount of dollars. 

There are some "catch 22" factws involved. For 
example if any institution, such as a bank, employer, or 
stock company, makes an erro- in reporting what was 
paid to you, you are liable for this amount until the 
issuing institution makes a correcting statement to the 
IRS. 

Unless fraud is invdved, you generally are safe from 
an audit after three years have elapsed. A 1979 return 
with a iiling deadline of April IMO would be subject to 
audit until i^ril 1983. 

Receiving a refund does not mean you are fiee from 
an audit. These procedures are done in different 
sections so be sure to keep all records. 

Being audited is a sure way of getting you to keep 
better reovds and to be informed on tax laws and 
procedures. The IRS audit is a source (tf discomfoft, bat 
consumers can reduce that discomfort by i^aiming 
intelligently and l«eping good records. 





iiMmdu 0^e€i/nut S^uxoe^^i^o^^i- ^o.', ^nc. 



QUALITY PROCESSORS OF PEANUTS 

Peanuts In The Shell A Specialty— Salted, Plain, Roasted, Raw 

We Salute The American Farmer - 

The Pride Of America 

And Remember - March is also 

National Peanut Month 

PEANUTS ARE THE FUN FOOD 




201 Beech SIrccf 

Suffolk, Virginia 23434 

Tekphone 

((04)934-3251 



PEANUTS IN THE SHELL 



beatnce 

BRAND 




Royster 

Agricultural 
® 

Prockicts Company 



p. O. BOX 5268. CHESAPEAKE. VIRGINIA 233240268 
TEL EPHONE (804) 545-3024 



We Thank Our Local Friends And Look Forward 

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In The Future 



To Our Customers And Friends 

Your Business Has Been Appredated 
We Wish Everyone A Prosperioiis Ytar 

POYNER OIL CO., INC. 

P.0.B9X70 
Moyock, Nortb Carafim 27958 




(919) 43S6471 
(919) 435^21 



Agriculture Week 17 




The 

Quest 
For 
100 



A heady dream for wheat 
producers leads to higher 
productivity 



"I beUeve Wfjinia Jarmerx 
can grow lOO-buahels-per-acre 
wheaf on a regular baMs. Resean.h 
and Extension efforts by agmnn- 
mists, entomol(^isls, and palhi/lo- 
gists are being expanded at 
Vir^nia Tet^h to dewlap the liUal 
package imUnling the Itest \nri- 
■ eties. tultivatitm tt^hniqiies. rhrmi 
lal am^tatiims, ninl «tfirr/>n« ftVitw 
that will produce UW bushels to the 
acre in most years. 

\dmittedh, this is a little way 
down the road^but I believe it is a 
i-ealistic goal. It is a goal that \w 
can attain, but one that is out of the 
reach of the fanner in the drier 
regions that currently grow most of 
the wheat in the United States. High 
production will give oury Virginia 
producers a competitive advan- 

*^S*' -l)aniel E. Brann 

Virginia Tech 
Extension 
/^ronomist 



Virginia In Top 10 



100 Bushels An Acre Possible 



For more than a year, Virginia Tech Extension 
agroionist Daniel E. Brann has been telling Virginia 
wheat producers that wheat yields of 100 bushels an 
acre are well within the realm of possibility for the Old 
Dominica. 

To emphasize that {prediction, a team of Extension 
and research specialists have managed to exceed the 
100-bushel mark in experiments at the Virginia Crop 
Improvement farm at Mount HdLly. The research team 
includes Brann; David E. Babineau, Extension plant 
pathdogist at the Eastern Virginia Research Station at 
Warsaw; and Marcus M. Alley, Tech research 
agronomist in soil fertility and crop management. 

bi demonstration plots, the researchers averaged 112 
bushels to an acre with three varietics-iyier, McNair 
1003 and Pioneer S-76~by using irrigation. TTiey abo 
averaged 105-bushels an acre for the three varieties on 
the noi-irrigated land. 

Brann iKited that the Virginia wheat producers will 
have to go a long way to regularly attain this figure but 
believes it to be a harbinger of the future. 

>ythough the final figures for the 1982 wheat crop 
have not been tabulated. Bran estimated that they 
would average about 38 bushels an acre oi the 390,000 
acres that were planted. This was down sharply from 
the 44 bushel average in 1981. 

He attributes the (tecline to the severe winter 
^ temperatures which reduced the fall develc^ment of 
the late winter wheat md drought stress when the crop 
was in the heading stage around May 1. 

The 1983 crop, the soecialist said, "looks as if it 
could be a record one." He termed the growing 



conditions for late planted grain as "ideal," while 
conditions for early grain were caUed "satisfactory." 
Brann noted that prices have not been good to the 
wheat producers. Prices dipped during the year to as 
low as $2.69 a bushel after going as high as S3.6S. 

He observed that farmers should get a return of $3.32 
a bushel if they wanted to make a profit with their SO 
bushels an acre. This figure takes into account the 
various operating costs, taxes or land rental and 
machinery depreciation. 

He said fanners cannot afford to receive less than 
$3.25 a bushel over any length of time w else "they will 
be in trouble financially." 

Total domestic use and exports of U.S. wheat in the 
nirrent marketine vear are exoected to fall below the 
record 1982 pruduction of 2.82 billion bushels. 

Carryover stocks will be substantially higher than a 
year earlier. 

Domestk use lilxly wUl reach 863 million bushels, up 
two percent, but exports wiH be down to about 1.65 
billion busheb. 

World wheat output is forecast at 462 million metric 
tcms, up four percent. Gobal wheat consumption is 
expected to rise about three percent but carryover 
stocks will be heavy. The United States hdds about 44 
percent of world stocks, up from 39 percent in 1W2. 

nices should begin rising in late winter and early 
spring to bring the average farm price to around $3.45 a 
bushel, about 20 cents below last season's $3.65. 

SOTie exonomists predict U.S. wheat prices could be 
25-50 cents a bushel higher for this year's crop. 



Tobacco Growing Changes 



Virginia tobacco growers enjoyed both the good and 
the bad during 1981. 

James L Jones, Virginia Tech Extension agronanist 
at the Southern Piedmont Research and Continuing 
Education Center, noted that there was fit least one 
record set during the year and the IMl bumper crop 
resulted in less tob»»» acreage. 

For example, the flue-cured aaeage quotas were 
reduced from 55,000 acres to 48,000 in 1982. Oxnplete 
returiB on the 1982 crop are not available as several of 
the mArioets are open. 

Jones noted that the price support* for 1983 are 
expected to be at the same or slightly higher levels ttan 

1982. ..... 

to 1981, the 8,400 flue-cured rowers in Virguua soM 
120.1 million pounds of t(*acco (or $165.90 P«r ^w 
pomds. TIk gtamn compensited for the reduced 
acreage by growing a record 2.185 pounds of leaf an 
acre. 

Flue-cured t<*acco primarily is used for cigarettes. 

The 2.219 dark-fired tobacco growers raised appraii- 
mately the same amount (rftob«;coin 1981 as they did 
in 1980-5.1 million pounds da 4.100 acres. They 
received $131.20 per 100 poinds, up slightly frcmi the 



$230;54 they averaged in 1980. 

Dark-fired tobacco primarily is used fa snuff and 
cigars with a great deal of the product being exposed to 
other countries. 

The burley tobacco producers grew 31.2 million 
pounds for an averi^e of $180.30 per hundred pounds. 
The producers averaged 2,350 pounds per acre. The 
number Gfpoumb was one million above the previous 
year whik the price was up significandy frgn the 1981 
figure of $143.57 per hundred pounds. ~N* 

Jones said that burley, which primarily is used for 
cigarettes and chewing, includes between 10,000 and 
11,000 growers on 16,650 farms with allotments. 

The sun-cured tobacco grower ccmtinues to have the 
fewest numbers. The approximately 300 growers had 
510 acres which produced 673,000 pounds or 1,32) 
pounds per acre. TTiey only received an average of 
$131.70 per 100 pounds. Although the price was up 
about four ddlars per hundred, Jones expects the 
number of growers to decline as prices do not make it 
wOTthwhile. 

Sun-cured tobacco is used in chewing t(*acco. snuff 
and fw export . 



More Poultry Consumed 
Production Not Rising 



Virginians are, like their counterparts in the 
remaining 49 states, eating more poultry. 

hi fact, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 
forecasters have said that its possible that final figures 
on 1982 consumption of poultry-includirg broilers, 
other chicken and turkey-may show it surpassed pork 
as the number two meat. 

The USDA speciaUsts said poultry consumption may 
average 61.8 pounds per person while pork consump- 
tion may drop to 55.8 pounds. , 

Despite the increased consumption. WilUam D. 
Weaver, Virginia Tech Extension poultry specialist, 
predicted that broiler production during the year only 
will increase one percent while turkey numbers will be 
about the same. 

He observed that in 1981, the latest year on which 
complete figures are available, Virginia poultry 
producers raised 134 million broilers which was up six 
perce;nt over 1980 figure: 

TTie state produced 10 million turkeys for the year 
which resuked in an income of $66.6 million. This 
means, he said, that producers in the state realized 
sales of over $290 million in broilers, turkeys and eggs. 
He believed that the final compilatitm of 1982 
production figures in broilers and turkeys will insure 
Virginia will remain among the top 10 poultry and 
turkey states in the nation. 

Producer numbers did not change much in the past 
two years. Weaver said. He said there are approxi- 
mately 1,000 broiler producers and 350 turkey growers. 
The broiler growers are located in the Shenandoah 
Valley, Central Virginia, Eastern Shore, and theSuffolk 
areas while the turkey producers almost exclusively are 
found in Rockingham, Shenandoah and Agusta 
counties. 

As for the oatUxk in 1983, Weaver said poultry 
producers can look to lower feed costs with prices 
averaging near the levels of this year. Feed costs 
represent about two-thirds of the total costs of 
production. 

"Price rises are expected to be hmited by the 
consumers being reluctant to pay more when their 
incomes are not growing. If there is a sharp upturn in 
the economy, prices may get strwiger," the Extiension 
specialist said. 

He observed that the low cost of grain caused by the 
nation's record production has been a large help to 
poultry producers to make a little money despite the 
low prices. 

If grain was in short supply and its prices high, many 
poultry producers in the state would be in a severe 
financial bind, he said. 




18 Africulturt Week 



Bane Or Barb 



Virginia Off-Farm Income_ 



The economic impact 
on the farms of Virginia 
was not harsh enough to 
cause liquidations this 
year, but it may be next 
year, say the financial ad- 
visers. The farmers them- 
selves, however, are 
feeling the stress and 
strain now. 

Financial experts view 
farms in the aggregate. 
The indication is that 
because 62 percent of 
Virginia's 56,869 farms 
are owned by those who 
farm them and the fact 
that may have off-farm 
income, the state has not 
seen the large number of 
foreclosures or farmers 
going out of business, as 
compared to the number 
in the West, said David M. 
Kohl, agricultural 
economist at Virginia 
Tech. 

Virginia farmers have a 
great deal of equity. The 
amount of money 
borrowed has not been as 
great as in the western 
states. The typical 
Virginia farmer has debts 
amounting to about 13 
percent of the assets- 
that's about 50 percent 
better than the national 
average. 

"With that kind of 
equity, they have absor- 
bed two to three years of 
low prices," said H. Earl 
Longest, general manager 
of the Richmond 
Association of Farm 
Credit. But in the next few 
years they will inevitably 
exhaust the ownership 
equity and there will be 
commercial fanners that 
can't make it. Agriculture 
is not profitable." 

Virginia farmers are 
"hanging on," Kohl said. 
He expects they will con- 
tinue to do so for another 
year~but that may be as 
long as they can go. 

"If any of three critical 
factors change to the 
detriment of the farmers, 
the fanners will be in a 
bind," said Kohl, listing 
the factors as interest 
rising, adverse crop con- 
ditions, or changes in the 
price structure. 

A farmer, however, 
may add another factor to 
the list-stress. 

TIk farmers view farms 
in the singular instead of 
the aggregate. They too 
feel this year is definitdy a 
crucial point in the tran- 
sition of the family farm. 

"The need for off-farm 
income to suMdiw the 
farm will result in a dif- 
ferent kind of individual 
in farming," said L. 
Chester Carter, a 26-year- 
old fanner from Stony 
Creek. It will not be one 
t^at has the dedication of 
today's farmers. 



Today's farmers are 
being driven out by the 
stress. The farmer of just 
four or five years ago still 
had the initiative and am- 
bition that was part of the 
imaxe of the farm family 
working together to make 
a good life as well as pro- 
duce food and fiber, he 
said. .If a tractor broke 
down, for example. Carter 
said, he fixed it at night so 
he could be back in the 
field in the morning. 

Now as the economy 
tightens, farmers are not 
able to receive prices for 
their crops and animals 
that allow them to pay 
their debts and continue 



farming. He sees Virginia 
farmers becoming 
seriously stressed and 
truly beginning to 
question if it is worth it to 
continue. He continued 
his analogy saying that the 
stressed farmer just goes 
home and plans to fix the 
tractor the next day. Then 
if the rain catches him, 
and he can't get the crop 
in, he has made a poor 
management decision. 

It gets to be a vicious 
cycle. Carter described. 
The stress of farming and 
the low prices farmers 
receive for their produce 
cause emotional stress 
within . the family, the 




The 1983 Virginia Beach 

Pick-Your-Own 

Strawberry And Vegetable Guide 



Introduction 

Following is a list of small fruit and vegetable pick- 
your-own producers and their crops in Virginia Beach. 
Call for exact picking dates and times before traveling 
to the farm. In addition, bring your own containers sin- 
ce they are not furnished at must operations. 

Approximate Crop Harvest Periods* 

Crop Period 

Strawberries Early May-Early June 

Green Peas Early May-Early June 

Blackeye Peas Late June-Mid August 

Snap Beans June-Fall 

Butterbeans Mid June-Fall 

Sweet Corn Late JunerMid August 

Grapes Mid July-August, October 

Peaches Mid June-September 

Beets Late June-Early July 

Crowders Mid July-Mid August 

Cabbage Late May-Mid June 

Irish Potatoes July 

October Beans Mid June-Fall 

Lima Beans Mid June-Fall 

Squash Late June-Mid August 

Okra Mid July-Frosl 

Greens Spring, Fall, Winter 

Sweet Potatoes Fall 

*Crop$ may not be available during entire period on 
some farms. ' 



team spirit deteriorates, 
and the farmers make 
poor management 
decisions. 

"Then the lenders look 
at the farmer and say 
you're not doing a good 
job." Carter said. 

The solution the lenders 
suggest is getting off-farm 



income to keep tbe farm 
going, he said. 

Carter knows the 
problems. He helps his 
father take care of a ser- 
vice station and a bull- 
dozer service in addition 
to running a 700-acre 
corn, soybean and hog 
operation. 



"If farmers get in a 
depressed state, it really 
takes a strong family to 
hold together and not give 
in to selling out." 

A farmer's drive to get 
the work done would be 
more if he were getting a 
fair wage, he said. 



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PHONE 547-1880 



334 BATTLEFIELD BLVD. N. 

(1 Mi. south of Chesapeake General Hospiial) 

HOURS: MON.-SAT. 8-6 
SUN. 10-6 



Virmia Beach 4'H 



Agriculture Week 19 



Ha Proud Agricultural Heritage 



■Rje Virginia Beach 4-H 
program is very proud of 
its deep agricultural heri- 
tage. In fact, much of its 
strength comes from ties 
to the Colleges of Agricul- 
ture at both Virginia Tech 
and Virginia State, Vir- 
ginia's Land-Qrant Uni- 
versities. 

Through the years the 
4-H program has grown 
tremendously as a result 
of support fitxn the many 



agricultural organizations 
who saw its value to farm 
boys and girls. 

With the tremendous 
change in demographics 
as well as the changing 
needs of today's youth the 
4-H program has expand- 
ed to many part of urban 
America. This is particu- 
larly true in Virginia 
Beach as the Gty's 4^H 
|M-ogram enjoys the best of 
both worlds offering over 



100 different projeas and 
programs for both rural 
and urban youth without 
regard to race, sex, reli- 
gion, or nationij origin. 

During 1982 the 4-H 
enrollment in Virginia 
Beach exceeded 6,000 
youth involving over 300 
volunteers. Last year's 
4-H livestock Show and 
Sale involved over 52 
youth from the Qties of 
Virginia Beach and 



Chesapeake, with the sale 
of their animals grossing 
$33,109. 4-H enrichment 
prc^rams were conducted 
in forty-five of the Qty's 
Public Schools. Over 239 
Vu-ginia Beach youth were 
involved in 4-H summer 
camping programs at the 
Southeast 4-H Educa- 
tional Center in Wake- 
field, Virginia. 

The Southeast 4-H 
Educational Center is a 



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1 — Solid endwall 
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4 — Lite Panis 
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1 — Solid endwall 
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Ask about our self- 
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CAU CmiECT 

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Office: (919) 398-3116 
Home: (919) 398-5342 



OUMrSintAvtitaMt 

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06 



dream come true for all 
dtizens of Virginia Beach. 
Virginia Beach has 
pledged to raise SI 50.000 
toward the continued 
development of the South- 
east 4-H Educational Cen- 
ter. To date, over $64,000 
has been raised towards 
this pledge. 

Perhaps the most 
valuable attribute of 4-H 
is the fact that it teaches 
the development of indivi- 
dual life skills and talents. 
Statistics have shown that 
a tremendous value can 
be put on a young persons 
4-H involvement. It costs 
approximately $20,000 to 
incarcerate a youth offen- 



der. Studies have shown 
that youth actively invdv- 
ed in 4-H have fewer 
problems dealing with 
lifes many challenges. 

The Virginia Beach 4-H 
program is interested in 
the youth of the Qty. The 
program is also seeking 
parents who would like to 
give of their time and 
talents to assist with com- 
munity 4-H groups 
throughout the City. 

For more information 
regarding the Virginia 
Beach 4-H program 
please call the Virginia 
Beach Department of 
Agriculture/4-H Office at 
427-4617. 




Sfrong Sfa/ketf 
Cokeri9Uk6i 
Thhk Planting f 



CfMter 19 is our earliest high 
yiekter. It's strong stalked, so plant 
It thi<* and reap the reward. And 
you can expect an additional yield- 
pop with irrigation. 

Coker 19 starts off fast and dries 
down in tfte field faster than any 
ottier Coker corn. It makes long, 
Jheavy ears with high quality, deep-set 
TTernels — a top grain corn for most 
any DELMARVA creeping system. 






it Coksr 19 avsnKied 161.3 bu/A 
last year In Maryland's Official 
Test at EINcott City. 

-k Coker 19 perfoniMd in the 
Virginia Offictal Varisty Trials, 
too. It producsd 155 bu/A at 
Vltarsaw, 142 bu/A at Blacksburg 
md 140 bu/A at Omige. 

Coker 19 ... a consistent hi^ 
yielder. PLANT IT! 




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SALUTES 

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& 

Chesapeake 

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WHY 1»IC DiSEIS JUIE GROlim 
OH MORE AND NMHIE HUmS. 



Because farmers know a gcxul 
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they see one. And that's jiist what 
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Take that CMC pickup, for 
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2-wht;el drive diesel pickup. 


ISI. riWV. . 1 l'\ 1 SI MI'd 


31 


21 





Then there's our medium-duty 
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Power is supplied by an available 
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diesel is also offered in CMC Top 
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The point is. all yt>ur farm 
trucks, whatever the size or type 
can be economical GMCs. And 
if you already run other diesel 
eqliipment. you can standardize 
on diesel fuel for all your farm 
machines. Talk it over with your 
GMC truck dealer. 



I sc csiimaiccl MP(i lor iKnip.irisoii Nour 
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TiieViiginia 

57tli Year. No. 11, Vir^ato Bcacli. Va. ^^-^^ MmOt W. 19»3 






Oberndorfand Heischober 






*^n 



25 Cento 



Republican Rivalry In The 7th 



Heischober 



By Greg Cioldfarb 
Sun Editoi 

It's not even spring, but already fall politics dances 
lightly on the cool sea breezes wliispering over Yirginia 
Beach. 

There will be two state senate elections on the Nov. 8 
ballot and a possible referendum on the direct election 
of the public school board. It's yet to be seen how 
many, if any, of Virginia Beach's five members to the 
House of Delegates will be challenged. 

Attention thus far has been focused on the newly 
created 7th senatorial district. It covers the Kempsville 



and Bayside Boroughs, and lies west of an imaginary 
Vmt that begins on th^ Chesapeake Bay at the 
Lynnhaven Inlet, down the river through Thalia, to 
Green Run, and southwest on to the Qirsapeake 
border. The district was created a year ago by General 
Assembly redistricting acdons. 

In this race two repuUicans, at-large city council 
members Meyera Obertdorf and Harold Heischober, 
will vie for the Ref^uliean party nomination at a party 
convention scheduled for this June. Oberndorf made 
headlines recently for |^(, slander suit Tiled against 
Heisch<^r after last spprg's councilmanic electicm, at 



which Heischober allegedly insulted some Council 
members. 

The Democrats don't want tnterparty opposition 
going into the electicm. They will field one candidate. 
Dr. Qarance A. Hdland, a former 12-year council 
member and former two-year mayor. 

In the city's 8th senatorial district, which includes all 
of Virginia Beach n<X included in the 7th, veteran 
senator Joe Canada, a Republican, will likely face 
opposition from Democratic at-large city councilman 
Robert Jones, an attorney. "It's definitely possible that 
See IT'S. Page 9 




* Betrayed'? 

Noona Supporters, Foes Point Accusing Fingers 



By Mike Goodmg 

Sun Staff Writer 

The recent firing of Virginia Pc^s conductor 
Walter L Nocma, Jr., by the Norfolk-based 
Virginia Orchestra Group has resulted in Virginia 
Beach's city council being cast as referee in a 
brawl between two very stubborn boxers. 

In caie corner is the VOG, parent organizaticm of 
the pops, which dismissed Virginia Beach native 
son Noona on March 3 when the maestro refused 
to accept a substantially altered contract for next 
season. In the other corner is the Virginia Beach 
Arts and Humanities Commission and its chair- 
man, James W. Roebuck, who asked council to 
withhold a $38,500 grant for the VOG's P(^s 
''series in favor of forming a new Virginia Beach 
Pops under Noona's direction. 

The contest, thus far, has been a stalemate. 

City council seems reluctant to mediate this 
bout. **I feel very strwigly that we shcmld not get 
involved in this," said Councitwoman Nancy A. 
Q«cch. 

"It never does any good for city council to get 
invQh««Lin thinfi U^ this becai^e we are alwayji 
the ones who wind up with black eyes," said 
Coundlman J. Henry McO^', Jr. 

"I believe it would be ill-advised iot council to 
get into this one," said Coundlman H. Jack 
Jennings. 

"I think we have to be careful at this point not 
to get swallowed up in the emotion of the 
situation," said Vice Mayor Barbara M. Henley. 

Yet, the same council members may have 
already begun to take sides. "I will do whatever 
the Arts and Humanities Commission asks me to 
do," said Jennings. "I believe in fdlowing the 
recommendations of our boards and commissicms 
because they represent the voice of the people." 

Henley concurred. "I place pretty heavy weight 
(m what the commission recc»nmends," she said. 



"The commission has always demonstrated iound 
judgement in the past and I have always \been 
<^n to their suggestions." I 

McCoy begged to differ. "The Arts \ and . 
Humanities Commission is supposed to be 
advising council in an unbiased way," he said. "A 
lot of the commission's members are friends with 
Noona and I think that might be swaying their 
qsinions. I've known the man since I was six, but I 
really think we ought to keep this issue at arm's 
length." 

Added Creech: "1 don't think we need another 
orchestra playing in Virginia Beach. Mr. Noona is 
a much loved figure and I respect him greatly, but 
there comes a time when you have to choose 
between what you personally want and what is 
best for the entire city." 

*'We are panning a full season next 
year of pops concerts at the Pavilion. 
Among the guest conductors we*re plan- 
ning is Henry Mancini^ When ift all **vert^ 
peopU are pfitig ta be 'saying, * Walter^ 
who?' - VOG President's Clay H. Barr. 

Council will formally address VOG fimding in 
May when it begins work cm the City's 1983-84 
budget. 

When the time, comes f<x decisicai-making, 
council should opt to continue its promised 
funding, according to Qay H. Barr, president of 
the 61 -member VOG. "When we voted to fire Mr. 
Noona, there never was any intent to slight 
Virginia Beach," she said. "We are planning a 
full season next year of pops concerts at the 
F^vilion. Among the guest caiductors we're 
planning is Henry Mancinl. When it's all over, 
people are going to be saying, 'Walter who?' 
SeeVOG.Pa»el7 





Bayside Forensics Captures First In District 

The Bayside Higk Sckooi foreuics tcan~l. to r. (seated) Asklcy Hide, Katkiya Brock, Chariotte Eike, and Lora 
Willtauns; I. to r. (staadiag) coach Unda Cobb, Cariot BarUlo, David AraoM, Brack MacCaU, Jewdi Lim, and 
ScoM Bariddi. Story, Page 18. 

^Co uncil Studying Question 

Beach Franchise Not 'Cut And Dry' 



ByUeCahiU 

Sun CcNincil Reports 

Choosing beiu:h equipment rental franchises is 
{M^oving to be anything but cut and dry. Although 
Vu-ginia Beach Gty Coundl has gone through a bidding 
process to help in selecting the company « companies 
that will run the rental/lifeguard operations on the 
beachfront, members Monday aftemooi apparently 
««re reluctant to give up the oM and accepuble for the 
iK\. and unkiKiwn. 

On the basis of the prc^xsals of three comfMiues, the 
dty suff reccmmended that the franchises for both tlie 



north and south areas erf tJw beach be awar<ted to 
Vu^ginia Beadi Pwrd, Inc. Tlw other two bidders were 
W.R Kitdun Jr. ii*o has operated the service at the 
north end nd QeMo Resets Service, Inc., who has 
operated the service at the south end. KItchin 
submitted a Wd for the north beach franchise and 
Ocean Rescue Servi<» for both the north and south 

fraiKhises. 
fchises. 

I^vid M. Grochmd, assistant to the city manager 
and chairman oS the Task Fora studying the Beacn 
See SAFETY, Pi^t 



Moloney Honored 



Kalblceii Maloncy, widow of slain V irginia Beach police officer Daniel T. Maloney, watches in Ihc rain 
as a Memorial in his name is dedicated. Councilwomen Meyera Oberndurf and Barbara Henley are at left. 
Story, page 17. 



Sciortino Says 



Without More Money 
Prosecutions May Drop 



By Greg Goldfarb 

Sun Editor 

Virginia Beach Common- 
wealth's Attorney I^ul A. 
Sciwtinohas put the State 
Compensation Board "on 
notice," and is also trying 
to rally public support. 

Facing a budget cut of 
$45,000 from the compen- 
sation board, Sciortino 
will later this month try to 
persuade the board to 
increase his $862,252 
budget by $162,801. This 
additional revenue would 
allow the purchase of one 
more conputer and the 
employment of four more 
attomies. 

The compensation 
board, however, may be 
tightfisted. 

At a recent press con- 
ference, Sciortino in a 
press release, that said 
the compensaticm board 
has "indicated that it was 
unlikely that the state 
would supply the addi- 
tiqoal staff to continue to 
prosecute all criminal 
cases in all of the city's 
courts," Sciatino said in 
a press release. 

This means, the press 
release ,s^jiL-Jhat.J!i 
"would be necessary to 
curtail the prosecution of 
tess serious crimes in 
order to properly prepare 
for trial those cases which 
are more violent such as 
murder, rape and rob- 
bery." 

Sciortino said that vio- 
tent crime in Virginia 
Beach is up dramatically, 
and without prc^r fund- 



ing, his office will con- 
tinue to be stretched thin. 

"Criminals do n« cut 
back on the ccmimission of 
crimes just because some 
bureaucrat in Richmraid 
says that we cannot affwd 
to prosecute them,'' 
Sciortino's press release 
said. 

"I hope the citizens of 
Virginia Beach will find 
this state of affairs as 

See SCIORTINO. Page 17 

300,000 



250,000 

260,000 

100,000 

75,000 

50,000 
15,000 
10,000 




Sciortino 




.-.«ctCO«^ 





5,000 



:n«e court 



1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 
Dtelrict and Juvealle Coart Cmc Imtmscs. 



Obcradorf 

Schools' 
Curriculum 
Assessment 
Completed 

By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

"This is the real heart 
and soul of education," 
said Dr. E. E. Brickell, 
Virginia Beach's superin- 
tendent of public schools. 
"This will set a direction 
for us; give us a master 
plan. We may spend a lot 
of time on day-to-day' 
junk, but this is what 
school is really all about." 

Brickell was referring to 
the Virginia Beach Public 
Schools Curriculum 
Development and Assess- 
ment task force recom- 
mendations, a document 
he was recently presented 
by Sharron Smith, chair- 
person of the 36-member 
committee. 

The report, which 
represented neariy two 
years' work by the task 
force, was based on input 
from 5,500 school system 
employees, 1,600 parents 
and students. The 140 
recommendations con- 
tained in the report, which 
are expected to be adopt- 
ed by the School Board, 
will shape the curriculum 
of public schools in Vir- 
ginia Beach into the 21st 
Century. Brickell said 
School Board members 
will be given a presenta- 
tion of the report at the 
regular April board meet- 
ing. 

"There are certain 
things every child should 
have," said Smith, a U.S. " 
studies teacher at Frank 
W. Cox High Schod. 
"They need increased 
math skills, exposure to 
the fine arts, improve- 
ment of communications 
skills and a basic empha- 
sis on literacy." 

To achieve these goals. 
Smith said the report con- 
tains "strong recommen- 
dations" for staff devel- 
opment. "In order to 
reach the point where we 
want Virginia Beach 
schools to be, there has to 
be an improving of meth- 
odology. Attitudes are 
going to have to change." 
Added Brickell: 
"Changing attitudes is a 
Uttle more difftculi, but a 
lot more permanent." 

Brickell, who had not 
yet read the report, said 
he wouli^ evaluate it 
thoroughly before making 
a presentation to the 
board. "I've heard bits 
and scratches about it, 
and from what I've heard 1 
understand the committee 
has gone pretty much 
right down the line of a 
position paper I wrote two 
years ago," he said. 
Although no specifics 
were revealed, Brickell 
and Smith suggested that 
several notable changes 
were in store, including 
stricter graduation 
requirements, more 
required math and scieiK:e 
classes, computer com- 
petency, and keeping stu- 
denu in school tiK entire 
day throughout the high 
school years. 

"We're going to teach 
people to reason and to 

Sce2.Piac9 



2 Virginia Beach Sun, Ntorch 16, 1983 -^ 



Sun Commentary 



Editorials 



Noona 



The situation surrounding the dismissal 
of Walter Noona as conductor of the 
Virginia Pops orchestra is most unfor- 
tunate. Many old wounds have been 
reopened, and the healing process may 
take quite some time. 

When the old Virginia Beach Pops 
merged with the old Norfolk and Penin- 
sula symphonies, forming the present 
Virginia Orchestra Group, the aim was, 
and remains to this day, to forge a 
cohesive regional unit that would benefit 
citizens of all cities in Hampton Roads. 
Through the cooperative efforts of several 
cities, a first-rate professional orchestral 
ensemble would result. It was to be a 
pooling of resources. 

Under the direction of Maestro Noona, 
the Pops flourished here in Virginia Beach 
as well as in Newport News and in Nor- 
iolk, where the orchestra also performed. 
Noona gained additional prestige for the 
VOG and for Virginia Beach by touring 
the United States as a guest conductor for 
other orchestras. He has been invited to 
return to 12 of the cities in whidfa he has 
conducted. Additionally, Noo^ia was 
named Virginia Beach's First Citizen in 
1981. 

Behind the scenes, however, the picture 
was not quite so rosy. Many VOG mem- 
bers, in effect the employers of Mr. 
Noona, were not completely satisfied with 
the maestro's conducting techniques and 
with his administrative performance. The 
VOG, as any dissatisfied employeer 
would, advised" Noona of its displeasure 
and in essence dem(^d'Mm^-Noona^ 
calling the proposed changes in his con- 
tract "degrading," said he would resign 
rather than accept a cut in salary and an 
elimination of his title as music director of 
the Pops. When Noona appeared before 
the Virginia Beach Arts and Humanities 
Commission proposing a reformation of 



a new Beach Pops orchestra under his 
leadership, it was the straw which broke 
the VOG's back. He was dismissed bv a 
26-13 vote by the 61 -member VOG. 

Was the VOG right to attempt to 
reduce Noona's role with th Pops? Was 
Noona right to appear at the Arts and 
Humanities Commission meeting? An- 
swers to these questions can only be 
speculative. " 

At issue now is the future of orchestra 
concerts in Virginia Beach. Arts and 
Humanities Commission Chairman 
James W. Roebuck has asked City Coun- 
cil to withhold its $38,500 grant for the 
VOG's Pops, and use the money instead 
to form a new Beach Pops under Nodna. 

Such a move would be ill-advised. 

Noona's contributions to this city have 
been unquestioned. He has been an in- 
valuable asset to the cultural and 
economic well-being of the resort city for 
a number of years. However, to create a 
separate Beach Pops merely to spite the 
VOG would be ludicrous. 

The VOG has already laid plans for a 
full Pops schedule in the Pavilion next 
year featuring, among others, Henry 
Mancini as a guest conductor. Another 
group, The Virginia Beach Community 
Orchestra, provides semi-professional or- 
chestra concerts at cheaper prices. The 
question is: could Virginia Beach support 
a third Pops orchestra? 

These are hard times. The working man 
has only so many ways he can divide his 
working dollar. Arts patrons have only 
so many nights per month in which they 
can attend orchestra concerts. Further, 
any moves to create a Virginia Beach-only 
Pops group would probably cause 
polarization between the resort city and 
its neighbors. 

All told, a Noona-led Beach Pops 
would be an unwise endeavor.— M.M.G. 



Sciortino's Plea 



Virginia Beach Commonwealth's At- 
torney Paul A. Sciortino painted a less 
than promising picture at a recent press 
conference. 

In a press release, he writes, "that 
without additional prosecutors, it would 
be necessary to curtail the prosecution of 
all misdemeanors and some felonies." His 
curtailment actually means elimination. 

Sciortino is faced with increasing num- 
bers of cases to be tried, but with no more 
prosecutors with whom to prosecute 
them than Virginia Beach had in 1978. 

"We can no longer handle the 1983 case 
load with the 1978 staff," Sciortino said. 
He needs more attornies, which costs 
more money. 

Scirotino's office receives two-thirds of 
its funding from the State compensation 
Board in Richmond. The other third 
comes from the city. State budget cuts 
have adumbrated a projected $45,000 
budget cut for Sciortino's department at a 
a time when he ne«is well over an extra 
$100,000 annually to keep up with a rising 
number of trial cases caused by Virginia 
Beach's constantly increasing population, 
couple with the Virginia Beach Police 
Department's escalating arrest rates and 
rising crime trends. 

Sciortino said the city had "not 
foreclosaKi us," and indicated that it may 
give his office funding for two more at- 
tornies. The State Compensation Board 
has, and can allocate the funds Sciortino 



^1 



needs, he says, but the city is not receiving 
them because the board is not reacting 
fast enough to meet the needs of 
Virginia's largest city. He will take his 
concerns to the board later this month. As 
far as the funding formula goes for each 
city, Sciortino's Deputy Commonwealth's 
Attorney Bob Humphreys said the board 
must "toss a coin" to decide what city 
gets how much money. 

Sciortino said that if he doesn't get the 
money to hire more suf f , he would have 
to "curtail the prosecution of less serious 
crimes in order to properly prepare tor 
trial those cases which are more violent 
such as murder, rape and robbery." 

Sciortino is required by law to 
prosecute cases in the Circuit, and 
Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court, 
but he is not required to handle cases in 
General District Court, thus suggesting 
that criminals may go free due to lack of 
prosecution. In addition, he said, more 
police officers are finding themselves in 
the role of investigator as the conunon- 
wealth's attorney's staff stays over- 
worked. Consequently, the police and 
sheriff departments are overworked, and 
public safety is jeopardized. 

Sciortino is asking r^idents to write the 
governor, the State Compensation Board 
and legislators and ask for local funding 
support in the name of r^ponsive law oi- 
foTcement and criminal justice. — G.D.G. 



Letters To The Editor 



The School Board Election Question 



l-dilor: 

^pointments to various Gty Boards and Commis- 
sions have long been a source of concern to me. Having 
learned our elected body, Gty Council, had appdnted a 
member of the Virginia Beach Schod Board whose wife 
is employed by that body as a teacher, I questioned, 
based on the State Conflict of Interest Law, whether 
this person could vote on tht proposed schod budget. 



Positive 

Editor: 

On behalf of the NAB Little Creek public relations 
team and "Up With feople," we would like to thank 
you for your article in your newspaper last month. You 
helped us reach more people in the Virginia Beach 
community. 

Sincerely, 

Mariel Blanco 

Anne Doherty 

Tucson, AZ 



In Jail 



Editor: 

If the Virginia Beach city jail is not so bad, as your 
repcxrter Mike Ciooding said, why was he scared oat of 
his wits? Granted, he didnt know what to expect gang 
into it, but he did know that the sheriff wasn't gdng to 

let anything happen to hi m. , ^^ 

Paulette Barnes, 
Virginia Beach 



Thank You 

Editor: 

With the daily diet of negativism that the public is 

fOTce-fed by newspapers, tclevison and radio, it was 

refreshing to read y«ir star last week on winning. It 

was both interesting and exhilarating. 

Thanks for perpetuating the positive once in a while. 

Mrs. Wilma Carter 
Virginia Beach 



Attorney Ckneral Gerald L Balilies, in an (pinion 
dated Februarv 25. 1983, states: "The material 
financial interest is employed at a general salary level 
where lOl employees within a class are treated equally 
and the matter before the board, the budget, is not 
directly related to the identity <rf a specific employee. 1 
am, aawdingly. of the opinion that the transaction in 
the instant case is one (rf general application. 
Therefore, the Schod Board member need not refrain 
from participating in the consideration of the budget." 
This is a blatant example of how the 'lawyer dominated' 
General Assembly in Richmond writes laws that sound 
good to the public yet are meaningless when it comes to 
protecting the public's best interest. No matter how you 
cut it, this person will benefit directly from any 
proposed salary increase as well as hospitalizatiai, 
reUremcnt benefits! With the exception of one 
Councilperson (Reba McOanan), a// dhers voted on 
the Schod Board appdntments this past December 
affirmatively which included the person in question, 
Rev. B.G. Campbell. As a result of this request, I 
learned that another member of the Virginia Beach 
Schod Board, James N. Fletcher, has a daughter 
employed as a teacher in Virginia Beach! 

With the number of persons residing in the 
KempsviUe Borough, surely a pers<m with no direct ties 
to the Schod System could have, indeed should have 
been appdnted. 

If ever a case were to be made for direct election of 
the Schod Board, here it is! The public would be 
exposed to the background and affiliations of candi- 
dates and determine fw themselves the persai best 
able to chart the course fw the care and nurturing of 
schod children and their quest for knowledge. I 
hcmestly beUeve the voting, taxpaying public would be 
far more scrutinais in their selection. We must make a 
try at this! Petitions are being circulated to get this 
issue «i the ballot November 8, 1983. The question on 
the petition (as it will appear on the ballot) reads: 
"Shall the members of the Virginia Beach School Board 
be selected by popular election of the qualified 
voters?" 

Let's show that bunch in Richmoid and our Oty 
Council that the taxpaying public docs care and can 
make a difference. 

Vivian C. Hitchcock, 
Virginia Beach ^ 



St Patrick's Day 



Learn About Patty At Library 
Library 



SUHIines 



Libnrin Ctfo^ Powrt 




As Virginia Beach residents get ready to celebrate St. 
Patrick's Day, it may be appropriate to sit back, sip 
your green beer and contemplate this particular holiday 
and the saint for which it is named. 

St. Patrick was born in the vicinity of Dunbarton, 
Scotland around 384 A.D. to a family of successful 
Christians, his father an official in the Roman gover- 
nment. The young boy's name was Maewyn, Patrick 
being do-ived lata* from his writings where he referred 
to himself as patricius, or well-bom. At 16, Patrick was 
captured by Irish raiders and carried into slavery in 
Ulster under the High O'Neill. He served as a shepherd 
for six years finding comfort for his loneliness in prayer. 
He would leave Ireland on board ship and would escape 
again after reaching France with the intent of devoting 
his Ufe to God. After study in Europe, Patrick heard a 
voice urging him to return to Ireland and after further 
study and preparation would return as a bishop 
scnffetime after 43 ! A.D. 

Moving from place to place among the predominantly 
Druidic Celts, he preached Christianity seeking ways to 
combine the old and new religions together. After 30 to 
40 years he made his home in Armagh and it became the 
Church center for Ireland. He is said to be buri«i neai 
the River Quile in Downpatrick, County Down, Nor- 
thern Irdand. Af^ lis <^a^, many stories and legends 
became entwined in tl^ truths of the historical St. 



Patrick making up the folklore we know today. 

St. Pauick's Day is the observation of the day of his 
death, not birth. Originally, the day was a religious 
holiday, b<K;oming more festive and secular as time 
passed. Over the centuries, as the Irish people con- 
tinually struggled for independence, St. Patrick became 
a symbol of their determination for survival. 

Immigrants brought their traditions with them to the 
New World. The fu^t celebration of St. Patrick's Day 
probably occurred in Boston in 1737 under the sponsor- 
ship of a group known as the Charitable Irish Society of 
Boston. It was a Protestant social relief organization. 
The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, made up of both 
Catholics and Protestants, began celebrations in 
Philadelphia in 1784. As more and more Irish im- 
migrants entered the United Sutes to escape the potato 
famines of the 1840's, they encountered hostility and 
discriminatiom They clung to their traditions and St. 
Patrick's Day became an expression of pride in their 
lwritit|e..ByilM end of the 19th century, observation of 
the holiday was widespread. Today it has lost much of its 
real reaming. The holiday has become a commercial, 
secular, particularly Americaniud holiday wherein 
everyone professes to at least a drop of Irish blood. 

Take a moment, then, to reflect on the real man and 
the real meaning behind the cUiy. It is in the mingled 
history and l^eod of our respective heritages that we 
can find ourselves. Dia's Muire agus Padraig dhuit. 

Further information on St. Patrick and St. Patrick's 
Day celebrations can be found in the various Virginia 
Beach Area Libraries. Of particular interest are the 
following: "Shamrocks, Harps and Shillelagh: the story 
of the St. Patrick's Day Symbols" by Edna Earth; "St. 
Paui^k and Irish Christianity" by Thomas Corfe; "The 
Lion and the Cross" by Hoan Hamilton; "The Life of 
Saint Patrick" by C^ientin Reynolds; and "Saint 
Patrick, His Origins and Career" by Richard Hanr 
son. 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

The Vittinm BemA Sun welcomes aiul encourages letters to tlM editor on any and all Virginia Beach 
m\xt&, as weU as any otho^ issues, questions or concerns affecting the well being of the Virginia Beach 
community. Letters should be typed, double sfMuxd and include the writ^ name, address and telephone 
number. Mail letters to The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. Rosanont Road, Virpnia Beadi, Va. 23452. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

13S Soath Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23^2 ^hoac (MM) 486-3430 
USPS-660-140; Pnbiislicd Wcdaesdays 



HnctBycrly 



GrcgGoMfwb 
EMtot 

Within Tidewater Area 

OneYear-$9 

All Other Areas 

OneYcar-SIl 

Two Yean -$17 

Secoiri Class P(»tage is paid at Lynnhavai ^dcm, 

Virginia Beach, VfijiiiMi 

TheyirgMaBeachSiuth»wmAtf9i-nit\k0K^WmAaaAetatammmvt 



IVirginia Beach Happenlnss This Week 

Wednesday 



Virginia Beach Sun. March 16, 1983 3 

Send your happenings lo The Virginia 
Beach Sun, 138 S. Rosemoni Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



•Iv« Blood At 

The American Red Cross Bloodmobile will 
collect blood on Wednesday, March 16 at Pem- 
brolce I - 4th floor, conference room, 281 In- 
dependence Blvd. from 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. 



Irommm Movlo Sot 

The Virginia Beach YMCA will present a special 
showing of the Ironman Triathlon, held recently 
in Hawaii. Hosted on camera by Bruce Dern, the 
film will be shown on Wednesday, March 16 from 
7 to 7:30 p.m. 

The Ironman Triathlon is a continuous event 
featuring a 2.S mile ocean swim, a 112-mile, bike 
race and a 26.2 mile - marathon run. The film will 
be shown in conjunction with the local Neptune 
Festival Triathlon taking place on Sept. 25, to 
benefit the YMCA's youth program. The film will 
be shown at no charge and the public is invited. 
The Virginia Beach YMCA is located in the 
United Way Center, next to Mt. Trashmorc. 



Thursday 



Porcoptor Chapfor Moots 

Members of Preceptor Alpha Xi Chapter of 
Beta Sigma Phi will meet at the home of Vicki 
Fanning, 5516 Carolanne Terrace, at 7:30 p.m. on 
Thursday, March 17. 

Final plans will be made for the Card and Pizza 
Party to be held on Saturday, March 26, at the 
home of Donna Dana. After the business meeting, 
the cultural program entitled "Wills" will be 
presented by a lawyer from The Legal Clinic of 
Stuart R. Gordon. 

For more information call 499-3567 or 486- 
1764. 



A Day Of Plowrort 

The Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture/ 
Cooperative Extension Service is offering three 
horticulture classes on Thursday, March 17 at the 
Virginia Beach Pavilion. 

The Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture/ 
Cooperative Extension Service is offering three 
horticulture classes on Thursday, March 18 at the 
Virginia Beach Pavilion. 

Class times are 10 a.ni., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m. 
respectively. There is a bne dollar per day fee 
which can be use<^/ar on&or all of the programs. 
Tickets are available at the door. For more infor- 
mation, call 427-4769. 



Muohlenbock, Honloy To Spook 

TTiomas Muehlenbeck, City Manager of Vir- 
ginia Beach, will be the speaker at the regular 



meetmg of the Back Bay-Pungo Qvic League on 
Thursday, March 17, at 8 p.m. at the xQtcd* 
Activities Center, 922 Princess Anne Road, next 
to Creeds Elementarv Schnd. 

Mrs. Barbara Henley, Vice Mayor of Virginia 
Beach, will also participate. All interested 
persons are welcome. For further infcvmaticm call 
426-7395. 



CLASP Botlnoss iAootiog 

CLASP (Citizens Loving All Special People) 
will hold its monthly business meeting Thursday, 
March 17, at 7 p.m. Location will be at the Bow 
Creek Recreation Center, 3427 Clubhouse Road, 
Virginia Beach, 

Ail voting members are encouraged to attend. 
All other interested persons are also invited to at- 
tend. 

For further information call either John Ditty at 
424-6239 or Harry Baird at 486-31 10. 



Arogono Clob ActivOrMto^tlog 

The Aragona Garden- Club is getting the jump 
on Spring with work parties to'clean, edge, mow 
and otherwise beautify entrance medians and ad- 
jacent areas. 

Recent club activities have included programs 
on parliamentary procedure and the judging of 
arrangements. 

The Aragona club meets at 10:30 a.m. on the 
third Thursday of each month at Christy 
Presbyterian Church, Aragona Boulevard.' 
Residents are invited to attend. 



Procoptor Hottf Boat 

The Preceptor Alpha Mu Chapter of Beta 
Sigma Phi will entertain Xi Alpha Ep>silon Chap' 
ter at a St. Patricks Day party on Thursday, Mar^ 
ch 17 at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Mrs. Richard 
Strong, 3024 Ashlawn Terrace. 



Friday 




Florence Lacy as "Eva Peron" will perform in 
the award-winning "Lvila," this weekend March 
18 through 20 at Chrysler Hall. The engagement is 
produced by Whisper Concerts, Inc., Virginia 
Beach. For more information or tickets, call 441- 
2161 or 428-4451. 



Tabomacio Protontc Drama 

David the King, Part 11 is the title of the drama 
to be presented by the students of Tabernacle Bap- 
tist Schools on Friday, March 18 at 7:30 p.m. at 
the church. 

The play will be presented in the School Gym. 
Tickets may be purchased at the door. , 

Fathor/SonNifhtSot t 

The Boys Club of Virginia Beaoh, 4441 South 
Boulevard, is having a father/son nigtitat thedub 
for members and their fathers on Friday, March 
18, from 6 to 9 p.m. Activities include volleyball, 
balloon stomp, and refreshments. ^^ 

For membership information, <;<ill*4W-23n 
(ext. 39). 



FARM EQUIPMENT" 





Carl Brickhouse 

1848 Indian Creek Road 
(St. Brides SecUon) 
Chesapeake, Va. 
f.n(:ATlQN: From Norfolk, Va. or Elizabeth City, N.C. or Interstate 
64, East or West, take Battlefield Blvd.. South, Highway 168, to St. Brides 
Union 76 Self-Service Gas Station. Turn onto Indian Creek Road and follow 
auction signs 4 '/z miles to sale. 



1-1975 Ford 5000 Diesel Tractor 

(real Clean - 1600 Hrs.) 

1-1964 John Deere 4020 Gas Tractor 

1-1964 John Deere 730 Gas Tractor 

1 - John Deere "B" Tractor (For Parts) 

1 - 4 Row Pittsburg Disc Harrow 

1 - 4 Row Long Disc Harrow 

1 - 4 Row Burch Disc Bedders 

1 - 4 Row John Deere Middlebuster 

1 - 4 Row Cultipacker 

1 - 4 Row Ferguson Tillervator 

1 - 4 Row Lilliston^lolling Cultivator 

1 - 4 Row John Deere /l«300 Grain Drill 

(like new) 

1 - 2 Row Pittsburg Rotary Hoe 

1-3x16 John Deere Bottom Plow 

1 - 7* Ford Rotary Mower 

1 - 14' Tool Bar 

I - Set of AMCO Hyd. Row Markers 

1 - Clark Weed Sprayer with 100 Gal. 

Stainless Steel Tank 



1 - 7' Allis-Chalmers Sicklebar Mower 
4 - John Deere 71 Flex Planters 
1 - 3 Pt. Sprayer with 100 Gal. 
Stainless Steel Tank & Booms 

1 - John Blue Liquid Fertilizer Rig 
with 150 Gal. Stainless Steel Tank, 3 pt. 

2 - Ford Grader Blades (6' & T) 3 pt. 
1 - Tractor Tow Cart 

1 - AMCO Drain Digger, 3 pt. 

1 - 200 Bushel Grain Cart 

1 - New Holland #68 Hayliner Bailer 

1 - Oliver 82T Hay Bailer 

1 - New idea #400 Hay Rake, 3 pt. 

1-1964 Ford F-600 Truck with 12' 

Grain Body 

1 - 1%1 Chcv. C-60 Truck with 14' 

Grain Body. 

1 - John D^re Model 55 Gas Self- 
Propelled Combine with Cab, 14' 
Grain Table & 2 Row #234 Corn Head 

2 - 250 Gal. Fuel Tanks with pumps 



AUCTIONEER'S NOTE: Mr. Brickhouse l«is discontinued his farming 
operation. This equipment is in good working condition. Most of it is 3 point 
hitch. If you need good equipment. Don't Miss This Auction. EVERYTHING 
SELLS! 

In case of snow on day of auction, sale will be held the following Wednesday, 
March 30th, same time. Open for inspection Friday, March 25th, and morning 
before sale. TERMS: CASH OR CHECK. Payment in full on all purchases 
must be made on day of sale to Jack Peoples. Bonded Auctioneer. 

M A isi V nTHFR ITEMS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION 

—Saturday MARCH 26, 1983 10:30 A.M.- 



Sale Raia or SMm 



/'resiJeni Util 



Nol Rcspomibte For Acckfoata 

_ For AAJilioaal laformalioa Coalact — 

JACK PEOPLES 

Bonded Auctionwr 

1340 HMd of River Ro«l 

C^peake, Va., 23322 / 

PbOM (MM) 421-^25 or 4n4360 



LUNCH AVAILABLE 




:♦ 
< 

s 
s 

s 



Saturday 



Coin, Stamii Show At Piavllloii 

Francis B. Frere, assistant director of marketing 
of the United States Mint, Department of the 
Treasury, Washington, D.C., will be guest 
speaker at the Tidewater Coin Club annual 
banquet which will be held in Virginia Beach on 
Saturday Evening March 19. 

Frere will attend the two-day session of the 27th 
annual coin and stamp-a-rama which will be held 
on Saturday, March 19 and Sunday, March 20, at 
the Virginia Beach Pavilion, 21st Street and Park 
AVenuc in Virginia Beach.* 

Adnii&sj<»si to coii^ an^ stiiMip-a-^a/na is.fre^ and 
the public is invited to attend on Saturday, March 
19 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on Sunday, March 
29 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 



Sunday 



Hockoy Volwnteort N««d«d 

The Boys Club of Virginia Beach, 4441 South 



Virginia's Largest 
FARM EQUIPMENT 

AUCTION 



SATURDAY MARCH 26,1983 
9:30 A.M. 

LOCATION: 4 miles West of Franklin Va on Hwy 58 



' ISnFwdFZUw.SMU 

> IfMCrwrMct PicliMp 

' IH4 0odg« IS Ft Dump 

' INI 20 f\ GooMMCk Slack Tr^«f 

■ i HowwIm T'aiitfs Il*« Mmr) 

4 HOW Dry* 4 HomM* '«l«rt 

< 1M< IrilaiVtMA* » Ft Bo«y 



I j-'ii JohnDwOuso^'ie 
' i^Tb 7 13^ •*'«•• wCrf lis 

' tare <* 10^ wwu- !0*i "f* 

' ^OCK,' ford 

t 3020 John Dee-e iDw**' ^S 

' 5000 f«a 

' ?da> JOfir De«*« !D*w 

> r06 lr<MrnjM<x>iil 0<Mi^ 

* tSOtteSMy Ferytr^of* 
' ?OO0FQraOi«*H 



'?5Mi 




1H»L«»Ford 
■ 14 Fl Hnd** Trart** 

24 Ft Equipment Ttctt^ 

Htm !• F| Slock Tr«t*« 

1?M Q«f &*tn(*tt SW*i T*nk Trsftst 
' 2 lonf 2 All* Tr»il*rft 
> a Hoi* Of<f 4 Lonq Trail*** 



-1 Gas 



• 12 Ft n^ 3Pt Ow 
' !2Fl WQ ?*a**« t^c 

■ i2Ft long 3 P! Osc 

• 7 Fl OH&rl Hmom 

• ^ 10 Ft %fatt*,Fe»yi. >■■"&« 
' 10 F! Jotfi Otmt tfafc- r*»e 
' 1 2 F! w*rfi*oral T'a*- :^*^ 

> 8 Ft 3 Pi For] Dnc 

> 3 «Fi tC«sDw 
' ? r Fl n m mi fto m d l> ■ 

• 2 6 Ft Fargusat Oat 

• 4 Fto« Krf» Bi*nB C*^ '"'«' 

• 4 Ptow LAtlO*! HoAng f ^' .*0f 

' « 2 Flow C- * » * * o r> ^ 

» Jetm, Pawn 4 How Sp^y *■* 
' 4 68 J^wDt^*'' '**^*B*i 

• 4 fkm M«y OiJawi « * C<J *Hw >r^ 
- i^ty ^eiw BtddB' • ■* C^» ft**** 

■ 3 S«! 4 Ro* Col* PI* '^ « Tad Bv 

» trt«n«lvrMl Ob-law P"* ^ « 14 



TodB.* 



EQUIPMENT 

' fl 1 1 ^' f * Ct-wiO, Bu'f* 

' 4 10 Sw»* Fpfywit* C»^Vi f^'* 

■ I 1 Sfl,** ifU-^r^H^^ ttws*- Pit** 

' t' FiWf^^jrifl f**tJ M*i 
I i GN«F^(3hM 

• r Shir* Ka^ Ch«e^ P>o» 

> 9Fl Je^w* DB«e Gr*n &* 

• jolwi Dnr* Siage Ctmv *3hl C 
p 9tGGoMS4K]fWig(^( C 

< 4 How Fe*oi(wnPear»ilOi9g«* 
3 Pt Pa* V=**-. 



I -n^^y^ '0*?*(. 



'jr*t\qn SmVA# OuA"V 
*^ JtfmuA S^av«^ 

Vt^^MA Hour? Co**** 



»^ Fee<3C«T 



t 14 f'jrrtPiO** 



3 %0 John Deer* 

2 393 li»i8 Oo»*^-« 

,' Suow Lang P**- ' C 



u^^-^ Cam and ■■»> Head 



^en Co"' *^*MCt 



»»EW€QUIPMENT 






t-Vlfmthm ^)»t *■ &a«Hi or *e*» 



S^0 Conducf^ e* 
■LtTMC $ MCHOM SCKVCE 



Boulevard, is seeking adult volunteer floor hocke> 
coaches, referees, and scorekeepers for our 1983 
season. The leagues arc designed for boys ages 
seven to 16. Call the Boys Club at the United Way 
Family Center, 499-2311 for more information. 



Monday 



iprhigArtClmsM 

Twenty-seven studio art classes highlight the 
spring term at the Virginia Beach Arts Center that 
begins Monday, March 21 in the center's studios 
at 1711 Arctic Avenue. 

Beginning and advanced level courses in pain- 
ting, drawing, photography, pottery, prin- 
tmaking, stained glass and calligraphy are offered 
to Arts Center members and non-members. 
Tuition costs range from $24 to $61 with ad- 
ditional materials and models fees required for 
some classes. 

Included in the spring class schedule are studio 
courses in silkscreen printing and lithography. 
Jack Thome, one of this area's ler ing silkscreen 
artists and an archchitect with Talbot and 
Associates in Virginia Beach, is instructing two 
classes this term. 

The eight-week term ends May 14. A complete 
class schedule is available at the Arts Center. In- 
formation may be obtained by calling 425-0000. 



' JkSilOClUtlOB Ww<#TO 
The Virgfnia Beach Chapter of the Virginia 

Restaurant Association will meet on Monday, 

March 21, at 6:15 p.m. in C K's at Hilltop. 
The speaker of the evening will be Virginia 

Beach Fire Chief Harry Diezel. 
All restaurant owners and managers are invited 

to attend. For information on membership, call 

499-5609. 



Tuesday 



Solar JUtoclof !•■ Moots 

The Tidewater Solar Energy Association will 
host a panel of professionals at its bi-monthly 
meeting Tuesday, March 22 at 7:30 p.m. 

The public is invited, free of charge, to par- 
ticipate with questions. The five panelists will be 
architect, George Wallace of Seaford; solar 
dealer, Mac ColUns of Energy Systems Plus, 
Newport Newi; solar builder. Mark Schaperjahn 
of David Construction, Richmond; E. B. Barker, 
appraiser, and Lit Hudgins, of Hudgins Real 
Estate Co. 



XI 

Xi Alpha Rho Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi 
Sorority will meet on Tuesday, March 22, 1983, in 
the home of Linda Gray located at 732 Abbey Ar- 
ch at 7 p.m. for a pot luck dinner. 

For farther information call 468-6547. 



Upcommg 



Moiior Af BomIi Briofft 

Dr. Betty Diencr will be the featured speaker at 
the Virginia Beach Chamber of Commerce's 
"Beach Briefs" on Wednesday, March 23 at 7:45 
a.m. at Orion's Roof, Cavalier Oceanfront Hotel. 
42nd Street and Atlantic Avenue. 



Mark Bryan and Wayne R. Eiban, Virginia 
Beach chiropractors, will discuss the influence of 
nutrition on health in a lecture on Wednesday, 
March 21 at 7:30 p.m. in the Kempsville Area 
Library in Virginia Beach. 



Metlfsmiiv 



I 



HAVE YOUR CARPETS 
AND FURNITURE 
CLEANED 
FLOWER-FRESH 
BY PROFESSIONALS 



[ LICENSED AND lONDED IN VIRGINIA* NORTH CAROLINA J^ I 



S^* <Ha Bf •*« Hiiq»i*T 




Duradeanf takes the soil OUT! 



Endorsed by furnishings 

manufacturers, 

the Duraclean * 

Foam-Absorption '< 

Process gets \^Z!S^ " 

the dirt out ^SCE^ 




,j!«-sl lor l,ii)':; ~ ,in(j 
hers Wdli h ( ^)lof^ 
,ind lenlures ••priiii; 
h,nk lo.lite It's all 
(liine in \i>ur home 
readv to' Hiit'-'*- iln" 



that the other 

111 1 ^l!^M' ( J.I V 

methods leave in' 

Caff u» tor a ft— Qut^ation 

Flower Frah Carpet and Furniture Cleaning 

Daradean-Biirton Specialists 
487-7M1 Chesapeake 



mam 






KM 



•mmmmtmmmmm 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, 1983 



Vir3inia Beach Sun Hews 





There's No Hole In His Soul 



Gtizen-of-die-Week this week is Jessee ^Un, 
a first line foreman and maintenjmce supervisor 
for the city's highway department. 

Whenever there is a sidewalk that needs 
mending or a pothde which nee(b |»tching, 
Austin and his nine-man crew are likely to be on 
the scene. 

"He's a good man, a good worker and most of 
all, he knows his job when it comes to concrete," 
said Oarence Grimstead, Austin's supervisor. 
"We have several crews, but our top crew is 
Jessee's. They get the job done right every time." 
Austin was nominated by Joe Russell, director 
of highway operations for the dty. 

Austin. 46, was found last week repairing a 
curb on the corner of 31st street and Padflc 
Avenue in the resort section of Virginia Beach. 
"We go everywhere in the city and believe me, 
it's a bv city." 

A Roanoke native, Austin has worked for the 
aty of Virginia Beach for nearly seven years. "I 



really enjoy this city and contributing to it in any 
way lean," he said. 

Winter is generally a busy time for highway 
maintenance crews, but this winter has been 
differem, according to Austin. "For the first time 
in several years there hasn't been a whole lot of 
snow or really bad weather," he said. "It's made 
our job a whole lot easier." 

Every morning, Austin leaves his wife, 
Annette, and his children, Jesse, Jr., 20, and 
Qiihy, 17, for a 7 a.m. arrival at the highway 
maintenance yard on Landstown Road. Often, 
Austin docs not punch out until well after the 5 
p.m. quitting time. "I don't mind the hours," he 
said. "It's all a pan of the job. 

"The best part of this job," Austin concluded, 
"is being in the outdoors. That alraie makes the 
loig hours and the hard work all worthwhile." 

Scad your ■omlBatims for dlliea-or-the-week 
to The Virginia Beach Sun. 13S S. Rmeraoat 
RoMi, Ylifinla Beach, VA 234S2. 



CoHocit mcmben Hcnlc)', iennii^ and hit wd Scan 

Council On The Court 



Members of City Coun- 
cil joined forces with em- 
ployees of several other 
city offices to participate 
in an exhibition basketball 
game during the recent 
Fifth Annual James K. 
Cole Basketball Marathon 
Classic at the Kempsville 
Recreation Center. 

A team comprised of 
employees of the city's 
Department of Parks and 
Recreation won the con- 
test, 32-29. 

Members of the losing 



squad included Mayor 
Louis R. Jones, coun- 
cilmen H. Jack Jennings 
and J. Henry McCoy, 
councilwomen Barbara 
M. Henley and Meyera E. 
Oberndorf, Police Chief 
Charles R. Wall, Fire 
Chief Harry Diezel. and 
assistants to the city 
manager David Crochmal 
and Michael Barrett. 

"It was fun, but those 
guys really tired me out," 
noted Jennings. 




SATURDAY MWMlIs^ 




f 



The Estate of Joseph E. Korleski 

Capevllle, (Eastern Shore). Virginia 



i@S3 10:30 A.M. 




Locotiftni From Norfolk, Va. or Salisbury, 
#624, 5 miles north of Chesapeak^Ba^Bridge 



Md. take U.S. Hwy. #13 to Capevllle, Va. 
-Tunnel and 100 miles south of Salisbury, 



at 

Md 



State Route 



^ 



an. 



Wall, 30, posilioBs for Grocbmal's, 35, (hoi 



Holland Announces 



78 International 1086 Diesel Tractor with 
Canopy & 18.4 X 38 Duals (631 Hrs.) 
1971 Oliver 1655 Diesel Tractor 
1969 Oliver 1650 Diesel Tractor 
1966 Oliver 1850 Gas Tractor 
1965 Oliver 1^0 Gas Tractor 
1969 Massey-Ferguson 180 Gas Tractor 
1963 Massey-Ferguson 65 Gas Tractor 



1961 Massey-Ferguson 

1962 Massey-Ferguson 
Allis-Chalmers'( 

Trucks, 

I ' 1975 chev. C-60 
1974 Chev. C-60 
Chev. C-60 
Chev. C-50 
Chev. C-50 
Chev. C-50 
Chev. C-50 
Chev. C-20 
Chev. C-10 
Ford F-600 



50 Gas 

35 Gas 

as^ Forklift 



Tractor 
Tractor 



with 1,440' of 



1972 
1970 
1969 
1969 
1967 
1970 
1965 
1962 
1970 
1965 
1966 
1967 
1978 
1973 
1956 



Truck 
Truck 
Truck 
Truck 
Truck 
Truck 
Truck 
Truck 



Bulk Potato Body 160 
14' Steel Dump Body3 



with 

with 

with Bulk 

with Bulk 

with Bulk 

with Bulk 

with Bulk 

with 10' Service 
Pickup Truck 
Truck with Bulk Potato Body 



Potato 
Potato 
Potato 
Potato 
Potato 



Body 
Body 
Body 
Body 
Body 
Body 



X 6" Irrigation 
Electric Motor 



Pumps 



Int. 1600 Truck with Bulk Potato Body 
Chev. C-65 Truck with Bulk Potato Body 
Chev. C-60 Truck with Bulk Potato Body 
Chev. C-50 Truck with Bulk Potato Body 
Chevrolet El C amino 
Chevrolet El Camino 

G.M.C. Truck with 1,000 Gal. Stainless 
Steel Fertilizer Tank 
1966 Chevrolet Sedan Automobile 

Chev. Truck with Short Dirt Dump 
Hatteras 12' X^ 50' Mobile Home Trailer 



1958 
1970 



Dr. Clarence A. 
Holland, a former 12-year 
member of Virginia Beach 
City Council and its 
mayor for two years, has 
announced his candidacy 
for the newly-created sute 
seventh senatorial seat. 
Holland will run under the 
banner of the Democratic 
Party. 

Current City Council 
members Meyera E. 
Oberndorf and Harold R. 
Heischober have already 
announced their inten- 
tions to seek the 
Republican Party 
nomination for the seat. 





Holland 



ulk Potato Bodies (Haines & Lockwood) 
Oliver #1810 Frohtend Loader 
12' John Deere #1630 Disc Harrow 
12' John Deere Disc Harrow 
4 Row McClenney Shank Cultivator 
4 Row John Deere Shank Cultivator 

4 Row Massey-Ferguson Rolling Cultivator 
6' Disc Harrow 
7 X 16" Semi -Mount Bottom Plow 

5 X 16" Semi-Mount Bottom Plow 
12' Oliver Disc Harrow 
4 Row Disc Bedder with Gandy Boxes 
Meyers 500 Gal. Pull-Type Sprayer w/48' Booms 
12' John Deere Grain Drill 
12' Massey-Ferguson Grain Drill 
Set of 15.5 X 38 Duals (Fits Oliver Tractors) 



B.B. FULK 

OPTICAL COMPANY 
OPENING SPECIAL 



—FREE— 

Bottle of Eyeglass Cleaner 

PLUS 

Have Your Glasses Adjusted, Too! 

5847-B Popular Hall Dr. 
Norfolk, Virginia 23502 . 
(beside Military Circle-across from Let^ts) 




2 Row Holland Transplanter 
300 Gal. Weed Sprayer 
6* Ford Rotary Mower 
1 - Air Blast Sprayer 

Shon Eniiipmgnt; 5 hp 

of Marquette Acetylene Outfits, 20 
Vise, 200 AMP. P & H AC-DC Welder, 
2-4 Drawer Me tal File Cabinets . 



- 15' Steel Tandem Axle Trailer 

- 4 Row Rotary Hoe 

- 4 X 16" Massey-Ferguson Plow 

- 1,000 Gal. Steel Tank 

- 20' Steel Flat Truck Body 

- 10' X 60' Cardinal Drive-On Platform Scales, 
(100,000 Lbs.- Electronic) 

IrrigatiAi^ gnpiinment 

1 - ^underbird irrigation 'System wi 
5" Aluminum Pipe 

16,000' of 4", 6". 7" & 8" Aluminum Irrigation' Pipe, 
. Plus L's, T's, Plugs, Couplers, Reducers, Etc. 
4" Sprinklers 

Chrysler Gas Industrial 6" 
Deming 4" Pump with 10 HP. 

2 - Irrigation Pioe Wagons 
Pntato f «ninmgnt 
1 - U Row John Deere Potato Planters 

1 - 1975 Lockwood Mark 6 Potato Harvester 

3 - Middleton Parrish Potato Harvesters 

2 - Deilts-Wetzel Seed Cutters 
2 - McConnell Seed Unloaders 

1-30' Haines Flure with Hydraulic Jtotor 6e Pump 
1-15' Haines Ch i.n Elevator 
2 - 6' 6c 8' Haines Washer 
1-7' Haines Sizer 

1 - 20' J.R. Dryer with 4' Opening 
1-10' American Roller Conveyor 
1-5' Haines Chef Machine 

2 - 12' & 20' Haines Belt Distribution Tables 
1-6' American Belt Pick-Out Table 
2 - Boggs Picking Tables & Sizers 
1-8' L-Belt Conveyor 

10 - Belt Conveyors from 5' to 50' 

1 - American Telescoping 78' with 
Bulk or Bag Conveyor 

2 - 50 Lb. Haines Roller Baggers 

1 - Ez-Way Automatic Bagger 
1-14 Head Weighmatic for 5 & 10 Lb. 

2 - Weighmatic 5 Lb., 10 Lb. 6. 50 Lb. 
1 - Weighmatic Automatic Master Packer, 5 to 50 Lbs. 

3 - Fischbein Model 4380 Sewing Machines (Will slide 
under L Belts) 

3 - Fisehbein Hand Sewing Machines 

4 - Fairbanks Platform Scales 
9 - Hand Trucks 

1 - 4,000 Lb. Barrett Electric Pallet Jack 
1 - 5.000 Lb. B/T Hydraulic Pallet Jack 
1 - 5 ' X 6 ' Aluminum Loading Ramp 
3 - Portable Johns 

200 - Wooden Pallets 
100,000 Paper, Master Pack, Burlap & Other Bags 
1 - Lot of Parts, Belts, Chain, Thread, Etc. 
AND, MANY OTHER ITEMS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION 
AMS Electric Air Compressor. Small Electric Air Compressor, 2 Sets 
Ton Hydraulic Press, Air Grease Gun, 30 Gal. Transmission Gun, Shop 
Plus Shop Tools and Parts, pfflce Equipment: Desks, 
Chairs, Sofa. Gas Heater & Time Clock, 



IS 



Long (Various Makes) 
50' Telescope 



Bags 
Baggers 



lEverything listed above sells at ABSOLUTE AUCTION l| 



461-3515 

RX Optidaii 
Bev Fulk 



Magnifiers 
Ray-Ban Sunglasses 



Hours: Mon-Fri 9-5:30 
Sat 9-1 



AUCTIONEER!SjlQn: This is some of the finest equipment that we have been commissioned to sell this 
yJlV Before Mr K?rleski passed away, he had all of this equipment ready to work. EVERYTHING WILL 
cptt'at ARqOLlTTE AUCTION with the exception of the land, residence, buildings and improvements and the 
special vehicles listed o n the back of this sheet. If you need A- 1 used equipment. DON'T MISS TOIS 
auction: See reverse side for information on sale of land, buildings, improvements. & special vehicles. 
In case of snow and ice on dav of auction , sale will be held the following Wednesday April 6th, same 
time Open for Inspection Friday. April Ist and morning before sale. Payment in full on all purchases 



^ 



must be made dav of sale_to^ Jack PeoBles_.__Bond£d,Aiictionee£. 



CASH OR GOOD CHECK 

JACK PEOPLES 

Boi«led AttGtIoiieer 

13M Head of River Road 

OMtapeake, Va. tSSBOL 

(l>Hai-2aSerl21»t^ 



LUNCH AVAILABLE 



SALE RAIN OR SHINE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS 

— For Additional Inlonnation Contact - BALI AOTHWUIID BY- 




AnyA twou w c t m t rt ilnae 



l».C.A.U»l»tt 



Ll^^ MO WNKO IN VIKINM & NORTH CAMNJNA 



BENJ. W. MEARS, JR., Executor 
Eastville, Va. 
(804) 678-5138 



\ 



Virginia Beach Sun. March 16, 1983 



Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 



New School Textbooks 



Several new textbodcs 
which have been recom- 
mended for adqption for 
use in the public schoob 
of Virginia Beach will be 
on display at several loca- 
ticms thraighout the city, 
beginning immediately. 
Several subject area texts 
are under consideration 
th's year. 

On the elementary 
school level, spelling, 
handwriting, and music 
textbooks fa- all grades 
will be considered; on the 
secondary level, physical 
science, applied physical 
science, earth science, 
applied earth science, 
bidogy, and chemistry 
textbooks will be recom- 
mended. 

The texts und^r consid- 
eration will be cm display 



at ,each of the five 
branches of the Virginia 
Beach Public Library 
through April 18. In addi- 
ticai, the books will be on 
display at the School 
Administration Building 
at Princess Anne until the 
day of the regular School 
Board meeting, Tuesday, 

April 19, 1983, at 2 p.m. 

> 

During that meetmg, 
the Schod Board will take 
action on the adoption of 
the recommended text- 
bodks. Should the recom- 
mendation of the Depart- 
ment of Instructional 
Services be accepted and 
the texts adopted, they 
will go into usage in the 
fall of this year and 
remain in use at least 
through June 30, 1989. 




Tribie Hosts Beach Students 



Virginia Senator Paul Trfble met with visiting 
Virginia Beach Presidentiai Classroom stuocBls. The 
students spend a weeii in Washington, visiting the 
House and Senate, meeting with top officials and lear- 
ning about the federal government. 



With Tribie, Jeft to right, are: John Benjamin 
Gadden, Nichlkus Court; Lisa Eileen Wright, Archer 
Drive; Susan Mary Barnes, Bay Point Drive; Mark 
Thomas Lenord, Tony Lema Lane. 



DON'T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY! 




PLAT OP A CtRTIklH P«OPt.KT"* 

iM TNt tkTivTC or 

OCA Pi. VI LLE 
PttarAMo na. m» at j«w f . owaac »b 



This plat has been prepared for information only and does not necessarily represent the actual dimen- 
sions of the property. 

day of Fam EqSi^ent Auc?ion. it will be offered at PUBLIC AUCTION Saturday. April 2. 1983. at 
12:00 Noon. ^ , ^.c- A 

M°MiE°Hi£ by^the^accepted^bidder Wil l "e^re^uired by cash or ban. S-^irE.'^KorL^^l ?""c^n^luslon 
oTbiddC ^^S s^tae ^^nl-to-takeliace w^thrj^days toilowing the auc?.on. ,l.„e. ..serves the 
right to reject any and all bids. 

This would be an ideal setup for a produce packer or aiiy other business that needs, a hub of operation 
^r tot someone looking for a great investment opportunity. 





■sPFfTAI VEHICLES FOR RAI E PRin R TO AUCTION; 

1983 Mercedes-Benz 500TD Diesel Station Wagon 
1983 Chevrolet El Camino 



If these special vehicles do not sell prior to auction, they 
also will be offered immediately following the sale of land, 
buildings and improvements. The owner reserves the right to 
reject any and all bids on these special vehicles only. 



ft TTFNTinN BUYERS ; • ^ 

The only things that can be sold prior to auction are the land, buildings and improvements, and 

SPECIAL VEHICLES. 




Everything on reverse side of sheet will be sold at ABSOLUTE AUCTION. 



Ml 



*• 



— FOR INFORWION CONTACT — 



JACK PEOPLES 

Bonded Auctioneer 
1340 Head of River Road 
Chesapeake, Va. 23322 
(804) 421-2525 



^2^jfi!£!2Ji^ 



Ar^ Anmwaameflts Madi 

On Sale Day Takes 
Precedence Ov«t This M. 



Prratdrnt Eirct 





BENJ. W. MEARS. Executor 
of Estate of Joseph E. Korleski 

Eastville, Va. 23347 
(804) 678-5138 



N.C.A.L. #1517 



Voice 

/Of Thfe People 

Regarding assaults, should 
police officers be afforded 
more protection than 
civilians? 



r- ' 



•7 think so. 

Policemen are out there 

in the streets with their 

lives on the iine more 

than other citiiens. It's 

not that I'm any great 

frjiend of the cops mind 

you, but I reaiiy thinli 

that they need more 

protection. " 

/ Oeorge Omohundro 

i Painter 

20-year resident 

'7 really think that 
there ought to be more 
protection for the police. 
They're exposed to a lot 
more vioient situations 
than average people. I've 
wanted to hit a cop many 
times, but I didn't 
because I thought I'd be 
in big trouble. Now I 
could get Into even worse 
trouble. I guess it's a 
good idea." 

Ricky Zieglar 

Gas station attendant 

21 -year resident 

"Nobody respects 
policemen. It's a real 
shame because they are 
the ones who have been 
given the responsibility 
of protecting us, yet they 
can 't even protect them- 
selves. I'm glad that they 
are thinking about af- 
fording more protection 
to policemen." 

Maria Dagostino 

Word processor trainee 
Five-year resident 



"The fat!$^ that a man 
In; a police uniform 
doesn *t necessarily mean 
that he Is above unpro- 
fessional actions. If a 
policeman Initiates 
violent action, he should 
e)^>ect a similar reaction. 
The citizen has the right 
to defend himself 
without going to prison. 
I reaUu police face a lot 
of violence, but they still 
shouldn't be elevated 
above the cltlaenry. 

Richard Hellinger 

Administrative aide 

Eight-year resident 






h \ 



Ore, Phelps Engaged 



Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
BurtOT Ore have announc- 
ed the engagement of 
tlKir daughter. Miss 
Suzanne Temple Ore, to 
William David Phelps, Jr. 

Mr. Phelps is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. WUliam D. 
Phelps of Virginia Beach. 

Miss Ore is a graduate 
nf Princess Anne (figh 



School and attended Tide- 
water Community Col- 
lege. 

Mr. Phelps is a gradu- 
ate of Kempsviile High 
School, Tidewater Oxt\- 
munity College and CHd 
Dominion University. 

The wedding will take 
place May 7. 



Gg 



Cross-Lites sa^: 
**God*s love is a constant love. 



Ceiib'iinif 



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6 Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, 1983 



Beach 's Miss Virginia - USA 

This Year They Were Looking For A 



Blonde 



ByGr^Coldfarb 

Sun Editor 

Virginia Beuh's Tanquil Lisa Collins, the 
newly-hailed 1983 Miss Virginia— USA, is no 
stranger to winning. 

In high school the honor roll student was selec- 
ted three times to the homecoming coait, and 
named homecoming princns in her senior year. 
She was homeroom president, a cheerleader, a 
student journalist, a monber of the foreign 
language club (Latin and Spanish), and ran track 
one year for the girl's and two years on the men's 
team. In 1978 she ran a S3-second 440 yard sprint 
that set a state record. 

"Tai," as she is known to her friends, is still 
athletic, running two miles a day, swimming 
regularly, and bicycling. But the demands of ser- 
ving as Virginia's latest beauty queen, coupled 
with the responsibilities of being a 
manager/assistant buyer for a local clothing store, 
will be a new hurdle for her to jump. Not to men- 
tion her contraiplation of attaining the title of 
liiss Universe. 

Tai, 5' 8". 1 10 lbs., moved to Virginia Beach 
two yrars ago, last December. The daughter of a 
Roanoke ctotha buyer, Norma, and a former 
baker, Hivett, she is a Ronoke native and has two 
brothers and a sister. Her father, now living in 
Colorado, is disabled^, the result of a stroke at the 
age of 33. His entire right side was affected. One 
of her brothers, Timmy, 21, is also disabled, the 
result of an automobile accident when he wa& 16, 
which broke his neck. He finished his junior and 
senior years in a wheelchair, and in one year in- 
stead of two years . He is now working with 
braces. 

A 1980 graduate of Patrick Henry High School, 
Tai attended Virginia Western Ccmimunity 
College for a year and a half, studying biology 
with aspirations of becoming a professional jour- 
nalist. 

"That's what I thought I wanted to be," Tai, 20 
years old, saui. "But I wasn't sure what 1 wanted 
to do." 

Tai quit coikge. moved to Virginia Beach and 
took a job in the sportswear department of 
La Vogue's, where she was later placed in charge 



of accessories. She worked there for about a year 
and then went to work at GiGi's at Hilltop, and 
next moved to Margot's, Laskin Road, where she 
now works. 

Tai, one of 74 contestants «t the recent Miss 
Virginia-USA Pageant, held at Kill's Dominion, 
was also one of 2,300 applicanu. She entered the 
pageant for her grandmother, but uimits she had 
always wanted to. 

"I've always dreamed of winning a pageant," 
; she said "Every year I've faithfully watched them. 
It's like a dream come true. 

"My grandmother had always wanted me to be 
in one and sent me a little ad out of the paper." 
she continued, "and I sent away for an ap- 
plication." 

The application r^iuested a picture and infor- 
mation, such as the applicant's measurements, eye 
and hair color, accomplishment's in life and 
future ambitions. 

Tai said there were about eight contestants from 
Tidewater in the pageant, six of whom were 
originally from Virginia Beach. The first-runner- 
up was from Portsmouth. 

"More Glamoroas" 

The first week in May. Tai will represent 
Virginia in the Miss USA pageant in KnoxviUe, 
Tenn., whose winner will go on to compete in the 
Miss Universe pageant, to be held this summer in 
Columbia. 

The Miss USA pageant differs from the Miss 
America pageant. The nine Miss USA judges look 
primarily for facial beauty, physique, and per- 
sonality. Miss America judges look for scholastic 
ability, talent, and then beauty. 

"This one is more glamorous." Tai said, "It 
goes on to Miss Universe." 

In the future Tai hopes to open her own 
business in Virginia Beach, noting, "it looks like 
I'm going to. I've had a lot of offers." 

She doesn't want to open a small shop.she said, 
but wants to find an old three-story house, refur- 
bish it, and sell gifts and china on one fioor and 
Couture clothes on the other two. 

She would prefer not to open it near the ocean- 
front. 

"I'd rather have the locals and not the 
tourists," she said. "The locals are here all year 
•round." 



Tai has been modeling since the age of 10, and 
hopes to pursue that avenue more seriously after 
she opens a business. Her modeling estperience 
help^l oue the i»geant pressure of being 
scrutinized by the cameras, audience and the 
judges. 

"I've been modeling for a long time, so I'm 
pretty used to it," she said. "I wasn't nervous at 
all through the whole pageant until I was one of 
the IS finalists. Then I was more shocked than 
nervous." 

At the pageant, Tai foctised on the judges and 
on not letting the audience or cameras distract her. 

"1 concentrated on the judga. eye contact is 
real important." she said. "You want to make 
them look at you." 

This year's pageant ended with four of the five 
finalists having blonde hair. 

"Every year they're looking for a different 
look." Tai said. "Obviously this year they were 
looking for a blonde." 

Virginia has had the most winners in the Miss 
USA pageant's history, Tai said, and is also the 
only state to have back to back winners, in 1969 
and '70. In 1970 a Vintinia Beach resident. Debbie 
Shelton, won the Miss USA pageant. In the 19S0's 
Virginia Beach also had a Miss USA winner, 

"I just feel honored they picked me to represent 
Virginia," she md. "Virginia has an excellent 
record in the Miss Universe pageant." Donna 
Dixon, featured on the television show "Busom 
Buddies," was the 1976 Miss Virginia-USA. 
"That's how she got started in television," Tai 
noted. 

Tai wants to be a businesswoman, but she also 
wants to marry and have a family. She likes 
Virginia Beach for its boardwalk, beaches and the 
sun. 

She also likes being a winner, but hasn't let her 
latest victory go to her head. 

"1 guess everybody loves to be a winner, it's ex- 
citing," Tai said. It's funny though. Now 1 sign 
autographs but I'm still Tai Collins. People think 
you're different because you win something like 
that." 

Tai's prizes for winning the pageant include: the 
use of a new 1983 Plymouth for one year; a full- 
length rabbit coat; a portable stereo system; a 
home video; a necklace with a Miss Universe em- 




'i guess everybody likes to be a 
winner, it's exciting. It's funny 
though. Now I sign autographs but 
I'm still Tai Collins. People think 
you're different because you win 
something like that. 



*» 



blem; her winning pageant sash; the pageant 
crown; a small pin in the shape of the crown; 
$3,000 in cash ($1,000 from MaybelUne. $10,000 
from the (Mgeant committee, and SI. OCX) from 
Hawaiian Tropic); $200 worth of Hawaiian 
Tropic products; $230 worth of MaybelUne 
products; a trophy; and pictures from the 
pageant. The pageant committee will also pay for 
all of her pictures in the future, and for Tai's 
traveling and lodging expenses while traveling as 
the reigning Miss Virginia-USA. 

Tai's othN- brother is John, 26. an artist. Her 
sister is dambi, 23, who works in a specialty 
shop. Tai lives at the HilltcH? area of Virginia 
9each. 



1 



rtsAnd Crafts Contest 



jOcean Park Women Get Awards 



fce,GI 
tan's 



,GFWC Cfcean Park 
Woman's Qub members 
of ^^irginia Beadi reaped 
37; ribbons fw the 37 
envies that they crochet- 
edi knitted, sewed, or 
quited for the dub's 
aniual Arts and Crafts 
Contest, under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. Lenora L 
wjich. Chairman. 

hi showtime, 19 blue 
rib|)ons, 14 red ribbons, 
thifee yellow ribbons, and 
onl white ribbon were 
awju'ded to winners. The 
wo(nen exhibited their 
handiwork at their tradi- 
tional meeting place, the 
cli4>room at the Ocean 
Pafk Fire Station. 

« 

K luncheon, coordinitt- 
ediby Mrs. June Ambrose 
aitfl her committee, was 
served to approximately 
3(^members and guests. 

blue ribbon winners 
wdre Mrs. Lorraine Ash, 
knitting; Mrs. Alice Bail- 
lid, crocheting; Mrs. 
Mfldred Christensen, 
crewel; Mrs. Kathleen 
C(|oper, knitting; Mrs. 
S^'ah Davis, candlewick- 
in|; Mrs. Shirley Emer- 
s(^, crocheting; Mrs. 
B^bara Engle, Christmas 
decoration and counted 
cress stitch; Mrs. Flora 
Gattuso, knitting; Mrs. 
Geneva Kinzie, weaving 
anti utting; Mrs. Mickey 
Liikas, counted cross 
stfcch; Mrs. Helen 
Mircer, counted cross 
stich; Mrs. Thebna Ral- 
stqn, liquid embroidery; 
M(s. Annie SteinnMtz, 
crocheting; and Mrs. 



4- 



Joyce Whitaker, crafty 
creature. 

Ihe judges were: Mrs. 
Reba McClanan, Mrs. 
\^a Lou Hayes, and Mrs. 
Kimberty Johnstone. 

Blue ribbon winners at 
the local level, listed 
above, will now enter 
their crafts to be judged at 
the upcoming Tidewater 
District Arts and Grafts 
Contest to be held at the 



Woman's Qub of Ports- 
mouth on Sunday, March 
13, 1983. The items will 
be on display from 1 to 3 
p.m. 




j MICHAEL F. 

tASANARO, JR. 

Attora^ 
At Law 

461-6121 

3 |Coger Executive Center 
SUITE 2M 

Norfolk, Va. 23502 



What's 
cooking 

at The Circle? 



LIVE MAINE 
LOBSTER 



r* NEW YORK 
SIRLOIN STEAK 



14 



95 



10 



95 



1 Vi lb. stuffed with jumbo ' The best quality steak 
crab mnt in Tidewater 



EARLY-BIRD SPECIALS 

• Sauteed Chicken • One Large , _.- , 
Uvers »4«« Crab Cake '5"' 

• Fried or Broiled • Fried Scallops $^2 S 



Trout 



$i;is 



LUNCHEON $"120 Tuesday Saturday 

BUFFET ^ 

NIGHTLY 
ENTERTAINMENT 

Ray Brown At The Piano 




itvd^ Steak Housed 

opens its doors in 

Pemlm)ke Mali. 



Lvendlaitini|stiak|e9tainiant| ^ ^ 



isgyei ^^^ ^ ^ 

I ipQie W&iA. Wo^ vAiety (just 
look at this sampling from our menu). 
More service (courteous people who 
show you to your table, clear away 
your trays and make sure your coffee 
IS always hot). And more value. We 
even have some special menu items 
just for kids priced at just $1.49. 

York is everything you'd expect 
a great family steak house to be. 
And more. 

PemtmdfieMall 

, y^ Open Sunday 11 am-8 pm 

Monday-Thursday 11 am-9 pm 

Friday & Saturday 11 amlO pm 

York Steak House is also located 

in New Market North Mall 

and Dynner Mall 



N 



FalMcds Served 




tEAFOOO REtTAUMANT 



Ta^day thni Satarday 
CkMcdMoi^ 



MM HIGH STREET 

PORTSMOUTH 

397-tlM 




600 

\ 

Attend 
Fights 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, 1983 7 





Beach bnsiBcssinen Stanley Bennett, president, Surf Rider Sports, Inc., produced the fighls. 

Lainhart, Harris, Bush, Hurley Win 



Virginia Beach boxing fans include Jeaiic Batchdor and 
LeeGoMsticker 



/^proximately 600 fight fans attended a nigfct 
of professional boxing, held recently at Rogue's 
in Virginia Beach. 

Of the seven fights on the card, five of the bouts 
featured Virginia Beach boxers, or kick-boxers. 

Virginia Beach fights included: 

Ric "The Bomber" Lainhart of Virginia Beach, 
now 6-4, knocked out Richrtiond's John Greene in 
the fifth round of a scheduled six-rounder. 

Virginia Beach's Ricky Butts, 1-1, was knocked 
out in the first round in a welterweight battle with 
Charles Carter of Charlottesville, 3-3. 

Virginia Beach's Pete Harris, 3-4, knocked out 
Carl Phillips, 1-1, in round erne in a light 
heavyweight fight. 



Virginia Beach kick-boxer Curtis Bush pulled a 
first round knockout on Portsmouth's Charles 
Davis; Virginia Beach kickboxer Jim Hurley 
stopped Virginia Beach's David James in round 1 . 

Ricky Butts, a four-year member of the Virginia 
Beach Boxing Oub, had the most talent of anyone 
on the April 17 card, one observer said. 

Mike Vaughan, the club president said, "Ricky 
Butts was the most talented fighter that night on 
the card. He l^ew he had a piece of cake and 
relaxed and got hit. That wouldn't happen again if 
the guy fought Ricky 1,000 times." 

Amateur boxing is scheduled at Rogue's for 
April 21, Vaughan said. 



Of Note 



Virgliiici ■•och 9§—d» ArtitH 

The Cby of Virginia Beach will cdebrate its 20th 

birthday wiih an outdoor fesiival Saturday, April 
30. As pan of this day long activity, space will be 
available for artists to display and sell their work. 
All art m^ia will be welcome for this event. 

If interested in participating in the art show, 
cpniaci Susan Miller at 463-0305. 

Wtmmm Per tp«clal P—^ 

A dance for physically and mentally handi- 
capped people will be held Saturday, March 19, 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Locations will be at the 
Bow Creek Recreation Center, 3427 Clubhouse 
Road, Virginia Beach. The dance will be spon- 
sored by the Virginia Beach Department of Parks 
and Recreation and CLASP (Citizens Loving All 
Special People). 

Participation is free. Refreshments will be ser- 
ved and door prizes will be given. The latest hits 
will be played. Parents and guardians are 
welcome, however, chaperones are present at all 
times. 

Transportation is available. Call Joy Stinnett at 
499-7619 weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. by 'Mar- 
ch 10 for arrangements. 

For further information call either John Ditty at 
424-6239 or Harry Baird on 486-31 10. 




W e can Jill all your construction needs 



THIS IS NOI OUR AD BUT, 
ONE FOR OUR CUSTOMERS 



Our organization has thrived for five years without advertisement. 
"Our customer referrals have kept us busy and we would like >ott to 
consider us for that upcoming addition, improvement or remudcling 
job. Your home, office or business is just a reference aw a> . ^^ e do the 
job you want, the way you want it done. Our customers tell >ou how. 
Move on up with us. Our prices come recommended as well. 



DecHs • Fences • Room Additions • Remodeling 
Altd-ations • Vinyl Siding • Storm Window & Door 



All Work Gualranteed 



468-1000 Home Office 428-6127 Sales 



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The Corvette Specialists 

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Free Estimates on Datsuns & Corvettes 

•Major & minor body worK 
•Fiberglass replacement panels 
•Rust repair 
•Custom paint 

144 S. Military Hwy. Norfolk 466-944> 



Gas Up • Fill up with Kerosene 
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



LYNNHAVEN 



Sixty - Six 
801 S. Lynnhaven Rd. 





We Don't 

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Your Back 

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Just 
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At 
Great Prices 



Jerry Parker 
Owner 



Transmission • Bralces • Tune up 
• General Repairs • 






\ 



IN CHESAPBAKE ^ 

THERE IS ONE RESTAURANT 
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YOU WILL TRULY LOVE 

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547-3022_ ^^^'^''^-X 11am 

TO 



Banquet Room 
For Fifty 



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11 pm 



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Buy any new Ford 
Series 10 three-cylinder trac- 
tor and take delivery between now and 
June 30, 1983 and we can help 
arrange financing through Ford Motor 
Credit Company 6t other participating 
financial institutions for qualified 
buyers for up to four full years at the 



low fixed rate of 10%% ANNUAL PER- 
CENTAGE RATE. New related imple- 
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with your new Ford tractor 

A qualifying down payment or trade- 
in is required. Certain restrictions 
apply. Physical damage and credit life 
insurance not included. 

'Or Other partiap^mg hnancial institutiais 



HURRY! OFmEXPKS JUNE 30! 

These are limited time often, so stop in soon for all the details and restrictions! 

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1792 Soutli Military Hwy. 

Cliesapeake, VA 23320 

420-4220 

Now OpM On Saturdays For Yoar CoBvcaience 
SAM -12 Noon 




mmmm^ 



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*"iV 



8 Virginia Beach Sun. March 16, 1983 



Virsinia Beach City Council b, u« cahm 



Beach Council Actions Safety is council's First concern 




Jolia A. 
Blad(waltr 



Naac} A. Cracch 
Ai-Lwir 



Bartara M. HcmIc)' 



HaroM Hriscliobcr 
Al-Lafxe 



H.jKkJtmriags 
tyiMtavMi 



L««b R. Joi^ 
Itaysidc 






Robert C.Jowt 


W.H.IUlcMa,ni 


Rein S. McClaaM 


J. Henry McCoy, Jr. 


Mcycra Qbcrmi 


At-Ur|c 


VhBtaiiBncli 


Priaccss AiiM 


KcniiMvUlc 


Ai-Uric 



Meeting Date: Monday, March 14, 1983, Ail Members Present 



• Informal Session 



Councilwoman Meyera Obemiorf presented a revised gun 
control ordinance including suggestions of citizens. The city 
staff will consider the ordiiuuice along with other suggestions 
for consideration of Council next Monday. 



KMi|MVlll«»«lff 



Councilman Dr. J. Henry McCoy Jr. called for study of the 
possible purchase of the Kempsville Meadows Golf and Coun- 
try Club by the Qty. 



Councilman John A. Bauin asked for a briefing froiB staff 
on changing floodways and iadusion of floodways as open 
space credit for developers. AjsiAant to the City Manager Giles 
Dodd, in the absence of City Manager Thomas H. Muehlen- 
beck, said the report would be ready in two weeks. 



Dodd announced that Muehfenbeck, who has been 
hospitalized, is now recovering at home. 



Dodd announced the Open Odor Chapel requested ex- ■ 
polition of its petition for a use permit to operate a 
detoxiPication facility. > 



Council discussed staff recommendatieits on the franchise 
award for beach equipment rental franchises and decided to 
make a decision next Monday after hearing from each of the 
three bidders. 

if Executive Session 

Council recessed into executive scnion. 

i( Consent Agenda 

Resolution of Appredalion lo Franklin L. Cox who has ser- 
ved as a member of the Community Servicei Board from 1977 
thru 1982. Approved 11-0. 



•Resolution of ai^eciation to Franklin L. Cox who has ser- 
ved as a member of the Community Services Board from 1977 
through 1982. Approved 1 1-0. 

•Rcsuiuiiuii ui Apprfciaiion to Johii H. Sutholand who has 
served as a member of the Community Services Botrd frmn 
1977 through 1982. Approved 1 1-0. 

•Resolution urging the State Corpwalion Commission to 
deny V'EPCO's rate increase reque^ l»sed on its fuel factor 
evidence; and, authorizing the City Attorney to intervoie in 
this matter on behalf of the dtixeos affectol umI to present this 
Resolution lo the Slate Corpofttwn Commi»ion on March 23, 
1983. Approved 1 1-0. 

•Oi .;in,^n,f fo Arnrr^ S-f»Sni» 'l-^?? of the Code of the City 
of Virginia Beach pertaining to sigm reqiiir«l on prupcriy. 
Approved 1 1-0. 

•Request of the City TrcaMicr for tax refunds in the amount 
of S2,274.SI. Approved ll-O. 

if Planning Items 

Ordinance to Amend nd Reordnn Aiticte 2. Section 200 (c) 
of the Comprehensive Zow^ OrdinMcc Pertainii^ to kM of 
unusual depth. fTTus item was defwred for two wa3a on 
Februar> 28. 1M3. Lefttr ft«a the City Mui^ transmitt the 
recommendation of the Plaaniac CommisiioB for approval. 
Approved lO-t. Henky dissnting. 

•Ordinamx to amend and reordaia scctioii 4.2(a) of the 
Subdivision Ordinance pcnaioiaf to eascaxnu. Letter from 
the City Manager trannia the recommendcatioo of the Plan- 
ning Commission for qiprovirf. Approved 10-1. Henley dissen- 
ting. 



•Application of Fred H. Feller for a conditional use permit 
'or recreational facilities of an outdoor nature (fishing) on a 
site located along the east.side of Southsid^ Road) south of its 
intersection with Old Rudee Boulevard (Lymthaven Borough). 
Letter from the City Manager transmits the recommendation 
of the Planning Commission for approval. Approved 10- 1. 
Henley dissenting. 

•Application of Gene S. Meekins, T/A Jaroco for a con- 
ditional use permit for an auto parts store and mufflei shop on 
a 32,SOO-square foot parcel located along the south side of 
Laskin Road, west of Village Drive (Lynnhaven Borough). Let- 
ter from the City Manager transiiiits the recpremendalion of 
the Planning Commission for approval. Approved 1 0-1. 
Henley dissenting. 

•Application of George Tony Sinilh for ji^copditional use 
permit for a single-family dwelling in the ACj-T Agricultural 
District on an 8.4-acrc parcel located along the south side of 
Sandbridge Road, east of New Bridge Road (Princess Anne 
Borough). Letter from the City Manager tranMnitsthe recom- 
mendation of the Planning Commission for approval. Ap- 
proved 10- 1. Henley dissenting. 

•Application of Tidewater Imports', Irtc^ fcr ^ change of 
zoning from O-l Office. District 'tO'B^r Community-Business 
District on a 30,579-square fool parcel located at (he northern 
extremity of Cranston Lane (Lynohaven Borough). Letter 
from the City Manager transmits the recommendation of the 
Planning Commission for approval. Apptoved JO-I. Hinley 
dissenting. ' ■ • . '. ' i 

•Application of Runnington InvestmfciH Corporationfor a 
variance of Sections 4.4(a) and (d) of the Subdivif icm pfdman- 
ce which requires thai lot siic,,,vvi^h,,ckDih, <JiaManiU)riaB; 
laiion, and minimum setback iifies shall W imfoprSr^Tor tni 
location of th^ subdivisioi^ and tK» t)^ brMpSUMntplateiSkHi- 
thai all lots have access to'a'puMlcsadcit't«ifl*fWintl« tit^i 
Manager transmits the recommendation etf the Planning 
Commission for approval. Approved ll-O, 

•Application of Nelson P. Tibbiitl Jr. tor a change c>f zoning 
from B-2 Community-Business District ttf AfiT Apartment ' 
District on a four-acre parcel located it the aorthwesi. corner ^f 
Oconee Avenue and Byrd Lane (LynnhaVen Borougji). Letter 
from the City Manager transmits the recommendtiiipn of the 
Planning commission for approval. Appfov^ 9-2. McClanan 
and Oberndorf dissenting. •-'. 

•Application of Mr. and Mrs. Allen M. Holmes, Fred and 
Elizabeth Soles, George B. and Edith K. Shields., and Michael 
Wilcox for a change of zoning from R-7 Residential District to 
A-3 Aparlmeni District on a 32,S(X)-square fool parcel located 
along the southeast corner of 24th Street ^nd M^iterranean 
Avenue (Virginia Beach Borough). i(This i9«tt# t«» dff^rpi 
lor 4 weeks on February 14, 1983 due to rf'tir«ort.)i:etttr ftom 
the City Manager transmits the recommendation of the Plan- 
ning Commission for approval. Approved 7-4). Henley, L. 
Jones,Kitchin, Henley dissenting. 

ir Appointments 

Deferred indefinitely. 

* Unfinished Business 

•Request of R. G. Moore Building Corporation for waiver 
of restirctions on a 3S.5-acre parcel. Bay Lake Beach - Ocean 
Park Area, Bayside Borough, continued for on^ week on Mar- 
ch 7. No action taken. 

•Request of Charles Bowden to waive city water at 
Wakefield Drive, Thoroughgood, in the Bayside Borough, 
continuerd for one week on March 7. Approved 10-0. R. Jones 
absent. ', 



Continue from Page I 

Equipment Rental franchises, repoted that the ciriteria 
used in making the recommendaticxi MgMiihfied the 
safety of the Beach and the qualificaticms of the bidders 
with the fee considered only as a tie-breaker. 

He said Beach Patrol offers innovations which will 
provide for a much safer beach than uffereU in the other 
bids. The innovaliois, in fact, appeared to be the 
deciding point. Also given as reasons - were the 
experience of the vice president, Edward Kue(ui, who 
will serve as beach captain, and the quality of the bid. 

Councihnan l^jbert G. Jones summed tip the attitude 
of Council members Monday afternoon when he said he 
belonged to the school that believed that if the pump 
isn't brd(en, dcm't fix it. He said that Cbunqil asked for 
bids for the franchises, the first time ever, because of 
cont^rns about violating the anti-trust laws and 
because of the reportedly extreme profitability of the 
operations. 

He said he did not think that a gain for the city should 
be a trade-off against the safety of the public. He 
expressed concern that the city, which had a "working 
pump." now had a bid for a pump with whistles which 
worlcs no better. Based qn the innovaticms and' the 
experience of the bidder, Jcmes said he could not go 
along with the staff. 

Fees offered by the bidders for the five year franchise 
period were, for area #1, the north end, Ocean Rescue 
Service, Inc., $83,397; Kitchin, $4,566, and Virginia 
Beach Patrd, Inc., $62,548, and for area #2, the south 
end, Ocean. Rescue, $20,849; Ocean Rescue, $62,548, 
contingent on receiving the Area #1 franchise as well, 
$62,548, and Virginia Beach Patrol, $62,548, 

As a result of the uncertainty over making a decision. 
Council has asked that the three bidders meet with 
Cotincil next MoKlay at 11 a.m. before the meeting 
where a decision will be made. 

Council also asked for a report from Grochmal on how 
the present (^rations work. "■ ''' 

Grochmal said that the task force felt that all the 
bidders were qualified. 

Councihnan John A. Baum pc»nted out that Council 
did not have much time to decide. The successful 
bidder will have two months to get ready for the 
summer season if the ccmtracts are awarded Monday. 
He said that since the recommendations hav«- been 
made public. Council, if it went contrary to the 
reconmcndation, would have to say why. He said that 
people often say what they will do, but don't aJwiys 
to4ew through. 

Grochmal said he could not assume that any bidder 
would do mwe than he stated. He said that since the 
bids were opened, all of the bidders had the' 
opportunity to trview bids of the others. 

Baum said that in his experience with theFedei'al 



government, the government dien ended up with what 
appeared to be the best cwitract but that it co«t tlw 
ga/atunent maiey. He said he hoped everything 
worked out fcM^ the best, but he had misgivings. 

Mavor I otii«i R lone^ asked whether Kuehn, who 
Nvould run the operation, was a stockholder. 

Grochmal replied that he was listed as vice president, 
but na as a stockhdder. E.Christopher Worrell, 
president, said later fh!»t he hdds the majority of the 
stock and will oversee the operation. Kuehn is not a 
stockholder, but Worrell said he has stock option. 
Worrell operates Worrell Brothers Restaurant at 1910 
Atlantic Avenue and is a former lifeguard. 

Mayor Jones said that Kuehn could leave and "we'd 
not have a qualified person nmning the service." He 
added ^^hat the caning up of the area for franchises 
started over the projection trf amillion doOars in 
revenues. "The bids don't reflect a million in reveniKs. 
Where is the million?" 

He suggested that most of the p>oints submitted as 

See BEACH, Page 18 




SUPERIOR 
BUILDERS 



Specializing in Porch 

Enclosures & Florida Rooms 

also 

ff 

•Custom Room Additions 
•Room Addition Siielb 
•Bathroom Remodeling •Garages 
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if New Business 



^ Request of Open Door Chapel to expedite peitition for per- 
mil to operate a detoxification facility. Approved tO-0. R. 
Jones absent. Hearing will be held on. April 18 after April 12 
public hearing by Planning commission. 



if Adjournment 



Council at 4:40 p.m. continued exeuctive sesaon and from 
theM adjourned. 



Oceana CO. Tinker 
Wins Navy Gold Star 



Captain C.L. Tinker, 
Naval Air Station Occam 
Commanding Officer, 
fKently r«:eived a Coid 
Star in lieu of a teooad 
Meritorious Service Me^ 
during a recent cerenKMiy. 
Rear Admiral J.H. fet- 
icrman, Commander Tac- 
tical Wings Atlantic, 
{N'esented the award which 
cited Captain Tiaker't 
supericH- IndatMp wMIe 
in command of MAS 
Whiting Field, Florida 
from August 1^ to July 
1982. 



WhWiv Fielit hccaae the 
first Naval MiWiy to 
com^ku * mmif m coo- 
traedi^ ^mc sfi^MiRf 
tenrkm Asri^ Captain 
TaAm'i tmmte. Uader hn 
pMtece, the MtfM run- 
way aad «r u^fm m»- 
trol towe*, were 

traiatag »:beMM. He 
^red Mpport of ho^ 
civil awl fevOTMWH 
gro^» ^m p rsieafhn a 
^Mprehefltive Air fv- 



Aallatkm Compatible Use 
Zone study for the pr<^?er- 
tks adjacent to Whiting 
FieU. He also implemen- 
ts! a Human Resoorces 
.Mai^^noH Department 
»idCe«abli»hed a Family 
Servkes Center two full 
yar» prior to fundi^. 

Rear Admiral Fetter- 
nan r«ofiiiz«l that Cap- 
tm» Tinker has carried 
Ms tame ^ofesMOfiattMU 
Md eompetCMy to hit 
4wtim as Ike eo^Mwding 
oirwrn ^ NAS fxeana. 






■flnkc 



"No one can give yc 
better advi« than your- 









TO HOLIDAYS. 



Lefs Talk UingDistance, Any Day 




Youdon't turn off your 
love with Ihe tree lights. 
And birthdays aren't 
the only days to show 
affection. There are 
365daysintheyear 
to love with. And 
to share with. Love 
isn't limited to holi- 
days. And neither 
is long distance. 







kT 



%tlt" 



Ckxro 






iSj^tBni 



o 



mm 



^mmmm^^^mmims^ 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, \%i « 



Student Creative Corner 
The Race Against Time 

Life is one evil race 

Agaimt the speed of time 

It can make you, or break you 

Or laugh at you with a piercing rhyme. 

So turn the other check . 

And the stinging blow will pass you by 

For if you don't find the dream you seek, 

At least you gave it a try. 

It's not too late for tomorrow 

Unless you bow to King Sorrow 

So be off, and on your way 

Thank God man, you lived another day. 

Don't stand powerless 

Against the elements of hatred 

They'll stomp you out, 

And knock you about 

Until things seem hopeless 

So don't falter, and keep a strong head. 

Thank God man, you're not dead. 

By Lcdcy Abb Doyte, 17, daughler of Mr. m^ Mn. Joteph V. 
Doyle. Lesley It a Junior at Flnl coloolal Hith School. 

Poem 

Lizards are small, 
Ai^ sometimes green. 
They hide under rock$ , 
And make you scream. 
They live in the desert. 
They scamper and run, 
And as far as I know they 
Ars not much fun! 
They live in the sand. 



Eat bup and flies, 
Ani this is what keeps 
Thon^ef 

■y 

li 




, It, teagkitf of Mr. M« Mn. 
ItfUi gnrfcr at Ncwtowa Rwirf 



My Animal 

I know a polar bear 

Who lives in a zoo. 

He's big. white and fuzzy. 

And his nose is blue. 

His nose is blue 

'Cause he likes it real cold. 

He's strong aiMi rourageous, 

Powerful ud^bold. 

He looks real friendly 

But you better beware. 

Don't get too close, 

'Cause he'll give you a good scarel 

By Ei|M4« (EMc) Croahy LayM|. 10, mm of EdiMe & 

uid Caral laiMi Uyaag. EMie k a nfth grader al Ncwtowa 



Dear Mr. Reagan, 

I think you should work on something different 
this year. Something like making new laws or 
having a day off and let Mr. Bush do all the work 
that you do. You are a good president for the 
United SUtes. Why don't you mow your lawn? 

Your friend, 
Jason 

By JaaoB Pclric, loa of Alcn aad Mai|Bi«t PcMc, Rooai It, 
lUi4 inido, Woodstock ElcflacBtary School. 



2-Year 
Study Is 
Completed 

C ominueJ Ircm Pai<? I 
solve problems," said 
Brickell. "I wish people 
would spend as much time 
worrying about trigono- 
metry as they do about 
making the cheerleading 
squad. These are the 
kinds (rf attitudes we are 
trying to change." 

The project began in 
July, IWl, when the five- 
member Curriculum 
Assessment and Develop- 
ment team, appointed by 
Brickell and headed by 
Virginia Beach Public 
Schools Director of Curri- 
culum Assessment and 
Development, Dr. 
Benjamin L lYoutman, 
began gathering data. 
Members of the team met 
with every employee of 
the schod system to dis- 
cuss their id«as about the 
future of Virginia Beach 
schods. 

Exemplary schools 
systems throughout the 
country were visited, and 
noted educational consul- 
tants visited Virginia 
Beach. Three public hear- 
ings were held in which 
citizens expressed their 
ideas on the matter. Then, 




Brickell reviews report with Smith 



the 36-membcr task force, 
composed of teachers, 
students, curriculum 
assistants, administrators 
and citizens at-large, 
drafted a new philosqjhy 
and goals statement, 
which was adopted by 
the Schocd Board last fall. 

Meanwhile, cmce all the 
data was in, the team and 
task f(»ce devised an 




It's "Possible" R. Jones Will Challenge Canada 



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3. 




Continued from Pate 1 

I will run," Jones told 77ie SMrt. 

Recently, The Sun discussed politics and their 
candidacies with Oberndorf and Heischober. An inter- 
view with Holland. Jones, and Canada will be forth- 
coming. , 
Oberadorf 

At home in Carolanne Farms, Oberndorf discussed 
many things. 

She's not in favor of a ccmventioo because voters 
have to i»y to vote, "rm not in favw of pdl taxes," the 
former 10-year chairman of the Virginia Beach Library 
Board said. Oberndorf is also the first woman ever 
elected to council and is currently chairman of the 
Southeastern Virginia Wanning District Commission. 

Oberndorf doesn't plan to spend huge amounts of 
money on her campaign. "I've never had the luxury of 
a massive campaign chest," she said, "but in exchange 
I've had the liberty to vote my conscience and do as 1 
please." 

Her cunpaign manager is her husband Roger, an 
engineer for the Ntrftjlk For* asseigjly plant. Het 
treasttfcr ft Lai-ry Ai^r. m m j 

Oberndorf knows her name has been publicized mor« 
than Heischober's and attributes it to-"Hving in the real 
world," which is a brief way of saying she's invdved 
with many local, state and national activities. 

Oberndorf, if elected, said she would call for a 
regional caucus of lawmakers to meet regularly and 
determine if state laws are cquiuble to all localities. 

She has run oirce before the Senate. 
Hebchokcr , 

Meeting in Heischober's (M(x at his car dealership 



initial set of proposals for 
curriculum. A citizens 
advisory group was 
appointed by Brickell to 
review those proposals 
and to offer suggestions. 

Again, the team inct 
with every school system 
employee to discuss the 
proposals. The final 
recommendations were 
assimilated during the 
first two months of 1983. 

The result is a compre- 
hensive, 88 page docu- 
ment. With School Board 
approval, all that is left is 
implementation of the 
report, which Brickell said 
could commence with 



Seeking 
Robber 



on Virginia Beach Boulevard, he said he doesn't 
consider himself a politician. "That word has some 
overtcmes." he said. "I don't think being in 
government is necessarily being a politician." 

Heischober has never run for the senate, but first 
became involved in the local legislative process in 1952 .^ , 

during a Norfolk city council race. He became jjeteCtlVeS 
interested at the state level in 1964 as chairman of the 
legislative committee of the Virginia Automobile 
Dealer's Association. 

Heischober has been active with several state 
republican gubernatorial elections, and congressional. 
He has had state appointments, and has served as 
president of the Virginia Automobile Dealers Associa- 
tion and of the Tidewater Automobile Dealers 
Association. 

Ifcisch(*er has the support of his family and friends 
in his civic endeavors, and says he's looking for a state 
office because "I have nowhere else to go in the 
legislative capacity." He has "no intention" of running 
against Delegate Buster O'Brien, who represents the 
district in which Heischober lives. 

Heischober's campaign managers for the convention 
are Shirley Sudduth, and Lorctta Tate. 
Potential candidates have until April 15 to file. 

PetidoBs 
Vivian Hitchcock is circulating petiticms calling for 
the direct election of the public school board. She needs 
15,220 names to have the question in the form of a 
referendum for the Nov. 8 ballot. 

The questions read, "...Shall the members of the 
Virginia Beach School Board be selected by popular 
election of the qualified voters?" 



ninth-grade students next 
fall. 

More than $200,000 has 
already gone into the pro 
ject accwding to Brickell, 
and another $250,000 has 
been requested from the 
1983-84 budget, he said. 

"It was always a laboi , 
and sometimes a labor ut 
love," noted Smith, "llic 
reason I can come to Dr. 
Brickell today and smile 
as 1 present him with this 
report is that 1 am confi- 
dent of all the support the 
task force has received. 
The key to this has been 
the involvement of liter- 
ally hundreds and hun^^ 
dreds of people." 



Virginia Beach Crime 
Solvers is seeking infor- 
mation about an armed 
robbery that occurred on 
Dec. 12, 1982, at the 
Econo-Travel, at 5819 
Northampton Boulevard. 

On that Sunday at 10:25 
p.m., a man waled^SA 
the front door of the lodge 
and, after the clerk 
unlocked the door, asked 
the elerk for change for a 
dollar. Once inside, the 
man pulled a sawed-off 
shotgun from under his 
coat and demanded 
money from the cash 
register. The clerk was 
also robbed of his wallet. 



"A man ought to read 
just as inclination leads 
him, for what he reads as 
a task will do him little 
good." 

Samuel Johnson 



Beach Registrars, Polling Places 



EXECUTIVES - PROFESSIONALS 

BUY A USED 
, CAR FOR 

nM 

DOLLAR! 

LEASE A CAR FROM 

ATLANTIC LEASING AND AT 

THE END OF THE LEASE WE 

WILL SELL YOU Ti^ CAR 

FOR 4. 00 

ONE DOLLAR 

WE STILL DO LEASE 
PURCHASE LEASING 

Call: Bill Martin 
425-6666 

Atlantic Leasing, Ltd. 
1829LaskinRd. 
Va. Beach, VA 



The Justice Department and Electoral Board 
have approved two new assistant registrars in the 
aty (rf Virginia Beach; Esther M. Corpus, Bank of 
Virginia Beach, 1068 Independence Boulevard 
and Cora Lee Taylor, lindsey Brothers' Plumbing 
Qxnpany, 865 Newtown Road. 

The frilowing is a revised list of places for voter 
registration in the Oty: 

GeneraF Regbtrar 

Municipal Center. Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Princess Anne Road (Next to Fire Station, P.O. 
Box 6247, 427-4667. 

Assbtant tegbtars 
[ikon for regbtnMton dcpcBdc^t 
on iadlvtdaal houn of opcnitioB] 

AnscU's Grocery Store (Back Bay), C.J. Aiuell, 
1037 Princess Anne Road, 426-2940. 

Bank ci Virginia Beach (Across from Haygood 
Shopping Ceuter), Esther M. Corpus, 1068 
Independence Boulevard, 422-3000. 

Bargain BooIb (Near Safeway and Wendy's), 
Harvey Eluto, Harriett S. Eluto, and Debbie 
VercU, 961 Providence Swuare Shopping Center, 
Prondetux and Kem|»vilk Road, 467-4422. 

Haircare by Penny's Barber Shop (Chinese 



Comer), Miriam Oden, 5061 Euclid Road, (Where 
Euclid, Witchduck Road and Virginia Beach 
Boulevard meet), 597-9045. 

Hairport (Near Farm Fresh), Ms. Billie Smith 
and Jacqueline Robinson, Great .Neck Square 
Shc^ping Center, Great Neck and First Colonial 
Roads, 481-6767. 

Kempsville Pharmacy (Near Big Star and Pizza 
Hut), Lucille A. Cassidy and Maxine Watson, 
Kempsville Plaza Shqjping Center, 5200 block of 
Princess Anne Road, 497-3516. 

Lindsey Brothers' Plumbing Co. (Near Bettie F. 
Williams School), Cota Lee Taylor, 865 Newtown 
Road, 497-6771. 

Pcmbroke-Aragona Pharmacy, Sally Marcel 
and Fran Mackie, Aragwia Shopping Center, 4848 
Virginia Beach Bojlevard, 497-3575. 

Thomas House, Ltd. (Oft shc^ next to Peoples' 
Drug St«e), Margaret Thomas, Princess Anne 
Plaza Shopping Center, 340-1814. 

Western Auto Store, Margaret Riggs and 
Jeanette Scarbwough, Buddy Riggs, 600 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, 428-435 1 . 

Fot any questiais on registering to vote, 
contact the General Registrar's (Xficc at 
427-4667. 




CRAFTS...withbaibara 



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April 1st. Barbara and the Crafty Ciitters 

will be at a new location (909 LiVeOak 

Drive, Ch«apeake) with a new concept of 

Arts and Craft 

Our Aim - to teach you what you want to learn 

at a price you can af fcmt. To assist prt^ram 

chairpersons of orgaaizations and groups 

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Watch Our Mows! f 

P.S. NuM your fee and we'R t^^y • cran matdi 



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g&mA^aMinposil , 

The robber Icli through 
the same door and was 
last seen walking west- 
bound on Northampton 
Boulevard. 

The suspect was des- 
cribed as a black male, 
with black hair and brown 
eyes, in his mid twenties, 
between 5' 10" and 6' 
tall, and about 155 
pounds. He was light 
skinned, had a thin mus- 
tache, and spoke with a 
soft southern accent. 

At the time of the 
robbery, he was wearing a 
tan or cream color coat 
and a knit winter hat. 

Anyone with informa- 
tion about this or any 
other robbery is asked to 
call Crime Solvers at 
427-0000. Callers are 
eligible for cash rewards 
of up to $1,000 when an 
arrest is made. 

The Crime Solvers pro- 
gram pays cash for infor- 
maticm about any crime, 
and for information that 
leads to the arrest of 
wanted persons or the 
recovery of drugs or 
stden property. You do 
not have to give your 
name to ccdlect a reward. 

Photos 
By Faheys 
Featured 

John and Barbara Fahey 
are the featured artists at 
the March Municipal Cen- 
ter Art Show, located in 
the City Administration 
Building at Courthouse 
Road and NcM-thlanding 
Drive. 

The monthly show, 
sponsored by the Virginia 
Beach Arts Center, is cm 
view Monday thrcMigh Fri- 
day between the hours of 
9 a.m. aiKl 5 p.m. fitclud- 
ed in the show are six 
color |^ot(%raph$ by John 
Fahey aiKl ten watercdors 
by his wife, Barbara. Both 
artists have received 
awards and recognitim 
for their work. 



immm 



m 



10 Virginia Beachsuns, March 16, 1983 



The Woman's View 



L 




Notes 
To 

My 
Friends 

ByJIMKINCAID 



November 12, 1979 

I have managed, Hiot to quit smoking, but to wean 
myself from cigarettes to what many consider a less 
harmful form of smoking. 

I smoke a pipe and though I have always smoked a 
Dioe to some extent, I now smoke a pipe to the exclusion 
of all other forms of smoking. 

I would like to do more but I cannot; and I know that 
the twenty-four-hour Great American Smokeout will 
be, for me, an exercise in guilt. 

My colleagues will parade their smokeless selves by 
my desk and shake their heads sadly at my degradation; 
aiid I will feel guilty— from behind a cloud of smoke. 
See NOTES, Pg. 15, Post. Pg. 1 1 Sun. 




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The 

Hint 

Man 

By CHtCK I AULKNbK 



Crazy Glue, Rcmoviog - The best thing to use is a soft 
cloth leaked in flngemail polish remover. 

Cream, Preventing Curdling - Adding a pinch of bicar- 
bonate of soda before mixing or beating will prevent 
cream and mjlk from curdling or souring. 

Curtain*, Removing Smoky Smdl - To remove a smoky 
smell from curtains, simply soak for at least two hours 
in cold water to which powdered borax has been added. 
Then wash in the usual way. 

Cut Glass, Cleaning - Dip a nail brush in warm water 
(no soap). Shake the brush out, then dip in baking soda. 
It'll come up sparkling. 
See HINTS, Pg. 15 Post, 11 Sun. 




The 

Uprooted 

Gourmet 

By J. ROBERT PERSON 



Tinkering With Deserts, Some Have A Pwl 
(Thank you very much for the great response I've 
received over the past few weeks. Other columns to 
follow will continue to be as exciting as the first. Keep 
the recipes and letters coming.) 

Everyone has an eye-a-peel for the banana and other 
fruits that bring us all so close to nature. That's just the 
way I anticipated my reaction would b0 when I was in- 
terviewing Mrs. Jean Parker, grandmother of 6, who 
has loved in Portsmouth over 35 years. In our first con- 
versation she said, "I never write down the recipes". 
After being convinced that 1 was not one to give-up, she 
not only gave forth a banana delight, but also gave me 
another handy hint for cooking fresh ham. 

See GOURMET, Pg. 15 Post, Pg. 11 Sun. 




The 

Chopping 

Block 

By PAT BEASLEY 



Now that the end of winter is upon us, 'Thank The 
Lord", this recipe sounds 'Real Invitihg*. 

With the air still somewhat brisk, what could be bet- 
ter than a cup of coffee or hot chocolate and these 
cheesy bacon puffs? Sounds like a good breakfast or 
brunch to me. , • u 

These muffins are nearly a meal in themselves with 
crumbled bacon and maple syrup and a cube Of natural 
Cheddar cheese inside added to convenient buttermilk 

baking mix. j^ • i 

Bite into them - mehingly delicious. Try and Enjoy! 

Cbccsy Bacon Puffo 

2 H c. buttermilk baking mix* 
10 sll<^ crisply cooked bacon, crumbled 

See BLOCK, Pg. 15 Post, 1 1 Sun^ 





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purchase 





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Virginia Beach, VA 234S2 
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Virginia Beach Sun. March 16, 1983 1 1 



NOTES — 

I hate to do it but 1 wiU have tq. brhig to bear the 
ultimate weapon at my command: I plan to fix e«;h one 
with an icy stare and ask: "When was the the last time 
you wrote to your notho?'* 

November 28, 1979. 

According to reporte that have bem drculatini all 
week, there's a phoiograi^er from Playbcy Magazine 
in Udewater oo a recrtutii« missioo; that being, to 
recruit women in unifonn. 

I guess tluit's misleading. The fellow from Playboy is 
looking for women who might otherwise be in uniform 
if they were not auditioiung for an appeanwcx in the 
pages oi May boy nugazte. 

We have been uiti^ to get a dear statement of policy 
from tht military u to Just how out of uniform (me has 
to be to incur the wratii of tiK brau. But. as I tmder- 
stand it, the policy of PUiyboy would dictate that the 
women in question be extremely out of uniform. 

I wouUn't know fen- sure, of coufse. I only read the 
articles. 

This series of cKopU from "NcMes To My Friends" is 
brought to you through the courtesy of The Doayag 
Company, a local publishing firm, ami Jim Kinoud. 
The book is available in most book stores. 

HINTS ; 

Dofi, ItcUi^ tmA ScratcUi^ - To st(^ the itching aiMi 
scratching, sprinkle the dog at cat with powdered 
brewer's yeast and rub it in with the ends of your 
fingers. Even if they lick it off, it won't hurt them; 
bnwer's yeast is good for them. 
Or ndx three laUavooas of olhre oil with one 
tablespoon of sulphur and rub it onto the area of it- 
ching. This is also a good healer. 

Dogs, Keeping Them Off Your Property - Buy one-half 
ounce of oil of cloves at the drugstore, theii mix it with 
one gallon of warm water. Fill a spray bottle and spray 
your grass, steps, and sidewalk. One spray a week is 
usually enough to keep them away. 
Dogs and cats abo Iwte hot pepper. Run a hot pepper 
through your blender, add an ^ual amount of warm 
water plus a teaspoon of liquid detergent. Strain and 
spray it onto the area using a spray bottle if possible. 

Dog and Cat Ktam - The best rinse is one-half cup of 
dry or fresh rosemary in one quart of water. Boil, 
remove from heat, and let it cool. Strain it if using fresh 
rosemary. When it's cold, pour it, a cupful at a time, 
over the dog or art. If possible, let them dry in the sun- 
shine so toweling wont be necessary. 
Chuck Faulkner is brought to you through the courtesy 
of The Domihig CbmiMUiy, a local publishing firm, and 
Chuck Faulkner. The book is available in most book 
storn. 

GOURMET — — — ; 

Banana Pudding 
(Jean Park« - Ports. , Va.) 

Eggs ...J^.^.^. .....:.: 3cach 

Sugar..... .^•:. ..;..., ..:.... 1 cup 

MHt ; ..2cups 

Four 2 tbsp. 

Vanilla Havor 1 tsp- 

Bananas 2 each 

I Separate egg whites for meringue. Put egg yolks intp. 



Gourmet Continued 
sauce pan with vanilla. Sift together flour and sugar and 
add also. Mix until smooth. Add milk while cooking 
over low heat until thickened. Line a 9 inch tkep dish 
with vanilla wafers (sides and bottom). Slice bananas 
and place a layer over wafers. Cover bananas with 
another layer of wafers. Pour sauce over top. Beat egg 
whit«, with a pinch of salt, until thick. Put in a 4 full 
t«upoons of sugar, then continue beating until thick 
and creamy. Cover top of pudding with meringue and 
brown in over 423 °. 

Fr«h Roast Ham 
Boil ham in covwed water for 2 to VA hours accor- 
ding to weight, with '/i cup vinegar, V* cup salt, and 1 
tablespoon pepper. Add 4 whole cloves or a pinch of 
£ouad.^oves. Wl»n it's done, place it in a pan so that 
the skinlide b up. Dice (score) skin through fat so it will 
brown nicely. Codf in over 425''until gcdden brown. 



BLOCK 



legg 

V* c. milk 

4 oz. Cheddar che^e. cut into 12 cubes 

2 tbsp. nubile flavored pancake syrup or honey 




Now, docsa't this picture say a thousand words? 



Heat oven to 400*. In smallbowl, stir together all 
ingredients Except cheese until well mixed. Spoon 
slightly less than 1 Tbsp. or batter into greased or paper 
lined 12 c. muffin pan. Top with cube of cheese. Spoon 
remaining batter over each cheese cube, niaking sure 
cheese is covered. Bake for IS to 20 minutes or until 
lightly browned. Serve warm. Yield: 12 muffins. 
* I use Bisqaick whenever things call for baking mix. 



■ANNOUNCEMENTS — 

from the Emergency 
Room entrance. 

A donatidn will be 
collected. 



CraftoSbowAtHmpital 

The Virginia Beach 
Medical Auxiliary will 
hold its Second Annual 
Spring Craft Show on 
Friday, March 25 from 10 
a.m. to 8 p.m. at the 
Virginia Beach General 
Hospital, Healthy 
Education Center. The 
center is located across 



The craft show will in- 
clude door prizes, a plant 
sale, auxiliary booth, 
beverages, bicycle com- 
pliments, bake sale and 24 
crafts people. » 



MB^A^M *^J^'^'»^ JSiri^^lM J/ I 



TAG IT! 

AND MAKE IT 
COUNT... 



TAX 

DEDUCTIBLE 



We Need: 

BOOKS 

TOYS 

BEDDING 

LINENS 

DECOR 



MENS, WOMANS & 
CHILDRENS CLOTHING 

HOUSEWARES 

CHINA 

ANY HOUSEHOLD ITEMS 



CALL: 461-4938 



FAST 

DEPENDABLE 
PICK-UP OF 

••Just About Anything' 




Announcements 

SI. Patrick's Day Danct 

A St. Patrick's Day 
Dance sponsor^ by sigma 
Delta Sorority will be held 
Saturday, March 19 at the 
Knights of Phythias 
Lodge No. 106, 3467 
Azalea Garden Road in 
Norfolk. 

Music will be by the 
Audio Entertainment. 

Proceeds to go to St. 
Jude's Children's 
Hospital. Donation will be 
$13.00 per couple. 

For more information, 
contact Margaret. Gibson 
at 482-3521 or 547-9222 or 
Kay Phillips at 482-3562. 

Miss America Pageant 
Preliminary 

The Miss Virginia 
Beach/Miss Tidewater 
Pageant is accepting ap- 
plications for its pageant 
to be held May 29, 1983. 

Young women between 
the ages of 17 to 26, and a 
high school graduate by 
September, 1983, may ap- 
ply by contacting Mrs. 
Polly Pearcc at 497-4759 
or 499-6567. 

Hickory Homemakers 

The Hickory 

Homemaker's Club will 
meet at the home of Mrs. 
Marian Pugh, 2608 
Smithsofl Drive, 

Chesapeake, Va. on Mar- 
ch 17 at 2 p.m. 

Extension Home- 
makers Clubs are 
available to alP persons 
regardless of race, color, 
religion, sex, age, national 
origin, handicap or 
political affiliation., 

Chamber of Commerce 
Women Meet 

The womens division of 
the Chesapeake Chamber 
of Commerce will hold its 
membership meeting Mar- 
ch 17, at 7 p.m. at Sunset 
Manor Restaurant, o 

Social hour begins at 
6:30 p.m. 

Mrs. Nancy Creech, a 
member of the Virginia 
Beach City Council will be 
the speaker. Esther 
Cahoon, wife of the 
Agribusinessman of the 
year, will be honored. 



CARRIER^ 
HELP! 




2 Reasons 

To Buy Carrier 

Cooling NOW! 



1. Savings 

Get the year's best prices 
plus high efficiency to cut your 
cooling costs. 

2. FREE 

With the purchase of a Carrier 
Air Condilioning or Heat 
Pump. We hand you a line with 
no strings attached — a Uniden 
Model EX300a _ Xardle&s 
Telephone Free! 

Builders, developers not 
eligible. 

One per customer. 




SALES* SERVICE •REPAIRS 
SPECIALIZING IN HEAT PUMPS 
SHEET METAL WORK 
SERVICE CONTRACTS 



CALL TODAY FOR A FREE EVALUATION 

OF YOUR HOME 

Find out how much a Carrier heat pump can save you, 

547-4444 

AMPMOR ELECTRIC CORP. 

' 123 Wayne Ave. • Great Bridge • Chesapeake 

- II Mil ir.>--r— ^ -■ i iii 




«MI 







oi"*"'^'>j. 



TIDEWATER /% 

COMMUNITY COLLEGE \ Vfe 

Spring Quarter Registration*' *vS? »*»^ 

Now Until March 21 
Classes Begin March 23 



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REGISTRATION HOURS: 



Monday thru Thursou^ 
Friday 



9:00 a.ni.-7:00 p.m. 
9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 



TUITION: 



PART TIME (Eleven Credits Or less) 
Virginia Residents 
Out-Of-State Residents 

Full-Timc (Tweive or More Credits) 

Virginia Residents 
Out of State Resident 



»15.50 per credit hour 
*66.00 per credit hour 



•186.00 per quarter 
»782.00 per quarter 



Credit courses by television available at all campuses. 



Please Call Today- 
Will Respond Quickly. . . 

WE WILL HELP GET IT OUT OF YOUR WAY 



Master Card and Visa accepted for payment of tuition. 
For more information, call: 

CHESAPEAKE CAMPIJS 

547-9271 



\ 



FREDERICK CAMPUS 

484<2121 

VIRGINIA BEACH CAMPUS 

427-3070 



12 Virginia Reach Sun, March 16, 1983 



mmmmmmmm 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 

Beware Of Gimmicks 



Despite escaJatimg 
premiums, today's 
homeowner stands to 
make a "wise buy" with 
an investment in homi in- 
surance, reports Con- 
sumers Digest in the Mar- 
ch/April issue. Even very 
affluent families would 
find it hard to survive an 
unpredictable disaster that 
destroyed their home-so 
most people wonder " 
How much is enough?" 
Appropriately, the title of 
this article. 

"Too many consumers 
let insurance agents tell 
them what gimmick their 
company has to offer," 
comments one of the 
many insurance 

professionals interviewed 
for the article. ""Hie con- 
sumer should tell the agent 
what cdverage . is 
required!" 

Homeowners can only 
know how much is enough 
if they look carefully at 
both the home and its con- 
tents, and compare-shop 
policies, which vary 
widely ifi strengths and 
weaknesses. "It's better 
to clarify your needs 
before buying the policy 
than to discover them 
when it's too late," Ad- 
vise the editors of Coiy^ 
sumers Digest. 

"Premiums for an inap- 
propriate policy are too 
expensive no fiMttir hoy/ 



low they are." i 

One way homTOwners 
can econ<^ze is to install 
safety features that en- 
courage discounts, such as 
smoke detectors or fire 
and burglary alarms. 
Homes built since 1973- 
or updated since then- 
also can earn discounts on 
many policies. And if 
you're buying or building 
a new home, you can hold 
premiums down by 
building or acquiring a 
structure with better than 
average fire protection (A 
brick home will cost less to 
insure than a wood home). 
If your town has a volun- 
teer fire department^ 
chances are your taxes will 
be less-but home insuran- 
ce premiums are higher! 

Consumers Digest also 
suggest checking differen- 
ces between HOI. H02 
and H03 levels of 
coverage. HOI rates may 
be much lower than H03 
rates with certain com- 
panies, and homeowners 
with older structures 
mi^t want to opt for 
HOI or H02. The wisest 
w&y to wnnomize, say the 
editors, ft is'to avoid being 
0W«rinsured. Homeowners 
CM. tun an independent 
ipprfdiii to compute 
Tepjkdemtax costs, and 
cbe^k tfiat agaiost the con- 



struction cost ihdex, 
which is used to determine 
a value of a House, and 
may be imprecise. 

An inflatioli guard en- 
dorsement, found on 
many homeowner 
policies, is another way 
many homes become 
overinsured. The inflation 
guard endorsement 
automatically adjusts to 
the value of a structure in 
tune to rising inflation. 
Unfortunately, consumer^ 
Digest points out, an m- 
surance company can 
write itself an autojpatic 
increase that exceeds in- 
flation! "If you ask for an 
inflation guard endor- 
sement, watch over it," 
warn the editors. "And if 
you don't have it, watch 
the inflation rate and ad- 
just coverage upward as 
needed." 

Consumer Digest also 
advises "replapemeqi cost 
contents" as^, additional 
coverage, thp^gn it may 
cost 10-15% m^re on tne 
premium. It guarantees 
Ihat the insurance com- 
pany will ' ^ay for or 
repla<fe <|ie .cpfifents of 
your house, new pr old. 
That additional coverage 
costs only $24 above the 
base premium with 'the 
Aitierican family "Gold 
Star" policv and $43 on a 
Mate F^rm policy. 



Since a standard 
homeowners policy covers 
contents to a limit of 30% 
of the insured value of the 
house, Consumers Digest 
advises collectors to 
protect their antiques, 
stamps and other 
valuables. Single Timit 
policies add the value of 
home and contents 
together, and allow for 
complete recovery if either 
structure or contents is 
lost. 

Even after your policy is 
in effect. Consumers 
Digest suggests preven- 
tative tips that could 
alleviate loss from flood, 
fire ore theft: 

•Keep valuables in 
lower drawers. In a fire, 
those drawers are the last 
to burn. Always keep 
copies of important 
documents offsite in a safe 
place. 

•The more solidly 
books are packed in a 
bookcase, the better their 
chance to survive a fire. 

•Be sure that you have 
the proper documentation 
that your insurance com- 
pany requires for proof of 
lownershipv 

•Keep items that may 
not be insurable in fire- 
resistant, tamper-proof 
boxes. , , 

'^Bcwgrt of Gimmicks" courlMy of 
Coiisumrrs Digtcl. 



Mayors 

Breakfast 

Scheduled 

Thursday, November 
17. 1983 is the date set for 
the 8th annual Tidewater 
Mayors Prayer Breakfast. 

Anticipated speaker is 
Dr. Richard Halverson, 
Chaplain of the U.S. Sen- 
ate, Washington, D.C. 
The Breakfast will ' again 
be sponsored by the Law 
Enforcement Officers 
Fellowship, as it has beeh 
since it began eight years 




Peateot, piarept's mcowI laifctt aotonaker, has developed robots to drive cars on company test 
grou^ ia eaalfni Fra«ce. T^ robots occHpy the rear seat of a test car; the front (shown here) accom- 
modates a MMBpater oa the pasaeager side and on the driver's i^ide, complex machinery manipulates the 
dutch, brakes, accelerator aad slecriag. Tke track siaiulates African trails fnd Belgian cobblestones and is- 
too roagk for kaaua dtlvcn. Aa averse test takes 14 weeks of non-stop 24-hour-»-day- driving. 



When we work for 

you, we really work 

for you. 

If you entrust someone with the 
selling of your home, you should 
know a little something about them. 

Last week we sold six of our 
listings. In five of the six sales, 
the buyers were found by the same 
agents who listed these properties! 

Sometimes, knowing a Uttle can 
help you a lot! 



Goodman Segar Hogan 

Great Bridge Shopping Ctr. 
237 S. Battlefield Blvd. 

482-3395 




tEALTCM 



Tidwater Board OfRealtors HonOre 

Ricarig)1s ^Jte)p Dollar Club 

Award Winners 





Tom Sciidoii 

Assoc. Broker 
GoM Award 



DciiMk Register 

Assoc. Broker, 
Bronze Awtitl 





Irene A. Capps 
Bronze Award 



MkbdeBriakley.ti.R.i. 

Assoc. Broker 
Bronze Award 



Saturday. March 5th, these 4 top professionals received 

their awards at the Annual REALTORS Banquet. We 

would like to salute these professionals also for their 

outstanding sales performance in 1982 making it 

OUR BEST YEAR EVER! 

WK ARK NO. I IN GRKAT BRIIKiF. 

RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 

^IJOHNSTOWM aOAD CHESAMAKE, VA. 

S47 4S55 

In Th* H««>t (M OfMl Irkf )• 



Almost 2,000 people at- 
tended the 1982 breakfast. 
It is anticipated the 1983 
Breakfast will be of 
similar size and scope. 




Contract To * < J Had A Dream 

Norfolk Firm 



5> 



Chesapeake Enter- 
prises, Inc. of ^4cM'foik is 
the recipient of a signifi- 
cant contract to provide 
mess attendant services at 
the Naval Air Station at . 
Quantanamo Bay, Cuba. 

M. Hawley Smith, 
IXrector of the Richmond 
District Office of the U.S. 
Small Business Admini- 
stration announced execu- 
tion of the contract. 
Valued at $472,000. the 
contract was awarded 
under the SBA's 8(a) pro- 
gram. Participants in the 
8(a) prc^ram are firms 
that have been declared 
socially and eccmomically 
disadvantaged by Public 
Uws 95-507 and %-481. 
The intent of the program 
is to assist such firms in 
achieving specified busi- 
ness , development goals 
whici will ultimately lead 
to a' hu^er degree of 
canparability ,with non- 
disadvamagecj firms. 



By Rip Coard 

David Cdvin "had a 
dream." David is owner 
of the Cedar Cove Inn, an 
elegant new restaurant 
located in the Fernwood 
Section, off Great Bridge 
Boulevard and on the 
Albemarle Canal in 
Chesapeake, He and his 
wife Robin, brought a 
wealth of experience to 
the new venture. The 
husband-wife team also 
have successful restau- 
rant/lounges in Nwfdk 
and Virginia Beach, but 
this one, said Dave is 
"exciting" and "my 
every waking hour is 
spent in finding ways to 
make it even better." TTie 
property Cedar Cove is 
situated on is practically 
surrounded by inland 
waterways that provide a 
beautiful setting for din- 
ing." From practically 
every vantage point, Mit' 
cafi enjoy ' the 'view 



through large picture win- 
dows. The interior is ser- 
ved by a tremendous bar 
situated center-room, a 
seafood bar, banquet 
roan for fifty, fireplace 
for elegant ^d rcHnantic 
fireside dining aild the 
warmth of natural wood 
and beautiful greenery 
throughout. 

The patio will seat over 
200 in the summer, and 
there are plans for an 
enormous playground fw 
the kids adjacent to the 
arch-style patio. 

Situated as it is, the 
Marina , docking facilities 
and gas staticms serve the 
boating community well. 
Add the ihterior seating 
capacity of 170 to the 50 in 
the banquet room and 
potential 200 on the patio 
and it doesn't take Icmg to 
realize this is an enw- 
trWrti'S restauriWt."'' '"'^' ■' 

"Ihafta «eMiS«!«rid' 



Dave last week, "and it's 
coming to fruition." 
Colvin is so right! Having 
eaten at the Cedu- Cove 
Inn on two occasions 
already, I and many of my 
staff can attest to the fact 
that Dave Colvin "ha» 
arrived," and Chesapeake 
is to be well served by his 
arrival! The food, prepar- 
ed by Chef Spike 
Markatos, formerly of 
Athens, Greece and a 
highly professional, total- 
ly creative "old-country- 
chef ' with over 27 years 
experience, is superb. 

The service is the 
friendliest down-home 
style I've witnessed f(x 
such an elegant restau- 
rant. It is a pleasure to be 
served so quickly and 
courteously. 

A class act, unlike any 
other in' Oiesapeake to 
-dar^knowlodg^. 



Serving The Real Estate Needs 
Of Chesapeake 

WAINWRIGHT REALTY 

Are you consideririg selling your home? If so, now is the ideal 
time. Call us for « free, no obligation market analysis. We will in- 
form you of the best methods of disposing of your property, 
various types of financing available and other information per- 
tinent to the sale of your property. 

3237 Western Branch Blvd. 

In The Heart Of Churchland 




484-7777 



Members of Portsmouth, Chesapeake Multiple Listing Service 
^ilelroMultiple Listing Service 
Portsmouth, Chesapralie Boawl of Realtow 




-1- 

/ 

/ 




SCHOOL 

ISN'TJUST 
FOR KIDS.... 



Since 1972 we've trained 

some of the most successful 

realtors and brokers in the 

Tidewater Area. Our graduates 

come from all walks of life. 

Some make Real Estate a 

career, other enjoy the 

freedom of part time selling, 

while many home owners 

take our course for 

their own personal 

knowledge. If you've 

ever been intrigued by 

Real Estate, give us a 

call today. Going to 

school can be fun. . .and profitable. 



SURETY 

REAL ESTATE SCHOOL 

5737 Princes Anne Road 
Virfinia Beach, VA 23462(804)499-23^ 







141 Virginia Beach Blvd. West 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

Phone (804)623-3831 

A DIVISION OF 0QU3MA1.SE«VK3C0M»0>ATI0H 



tlKAdantk P^rnaiieiit MoilgBge Comiiany 

A Whidly Owned SiAnifor? of Atlantic Pmnaaait Federal 
Saviflas & Loan Association 

944 Indepoidence Blvd. 
Virginia &ach, Virginia 234SS 

(804)460.1376/2810 



iSo/imea/ 




^oni^uimu 



A DIVISION OF (XHXmiAL^RVICECOIirOKATION 

Virginia Be»;h B<Mlevard West 

Norfolk. Virginia 23310 

Phone (804) 623-3753 



L^oionial cJitie 

A DIVtMW OF COLONIAL SERVICBOOkKMATION 

141 Virginia Bej^h Blvd. West 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

Tekphone: (W4) ^3.383 1 



"^^Wi 



1^" 



■^^MBinnv 



mw^nmrn^m^^mmt 



Virginii BMch Sun, March 16, 1983 13 



Business, Real Estate ft Finance 



Realtors Propose 
"Double Freeze*' 



The I^tiooal Associa- 
tion of Realtor today 
proposed to congren that 
a "double freeze" u> put 
into effect, starting with 
the fisi»l 1984 federal 
budget and coisisting of a 
freeze on aggregate real 
spending and a freeze on 
changes in tax rates. 

Dr. Jack Carlson, chief 
economist and executive 
vice president of the Asso- 
ciation, described the pro- 
posal and the beneficial 
effects that would result 
in testimony presented to 
the House Budget Com- 
mittee. 

The benefits would 
include: 

•A strengthening of 
the current recovery from 
recession, including 
greater growth in output, 
income and employment; 

•A reduction in the 
inflation rate and a lessing 
of fears that inflation will 
once again skyrocket; 

•Declines in interest 
rates to levels closer to 
their historic relationships 
with inflation which would 
result in increased job 
opportunities and increas- 
ed investment in general 
and specifically in hous- 
ing; 

•An improved standard 
of living for most Ameri- 
cans. 

The Association recono- 
mends that Congress 
restrict increases in 
aggregate federal spend- 
ing during fiscal years 
1984-86 to no mcM-e than 
the 5 percent growth of 
inflaticm in 1984. 

This ^ivould require 
limiting the growth of cost 
of living adjustments 
(COIA) ^>i^d to public 
programs id 'match the 
OOLA growth in the ,pHn 
vate sector, which ranges 



from one-half to two- 
thirds of the changes in 
the Consumer Price 
Index. Congress also 
would have to consider 
slowing the growth of 
defense spending to S 
percent to 7 percent above 
the inflation rate-a range 
previ<wsly supported by 
Presidents Reagan, Car- 
ter and Ford, Carlson 
said. 

"The multi-year freeze 
in spending alone would 
produce a significantly 
better fiscal condition 
compared to the presi- 
dent's proposal of a one- 
year spending freeze and 
then spending growth as 
usual," Carlson said. "By 
1986, spending would be 
$104.3 billim less, the 
trigger tax in 1986 would 
not be necessary, tax 
receipts would be S46 
billicm lower and the 
deficit would be down to 
$129 bilUon-trending to 
zero by 1989." 

In addition, there 
should be no across-the- 
board tax rate increase or 
decrease in \9B3 or' 1984- 
which would mean elimi- 
nating the 1983 cut in 
personal income taxes of 
10 percent and moving the 
effective date for indexing 
personal income tax brac- 
kets to Jan. 1. 1984-and 
no tax rate changes in 
1985 or 1986. the econo- 
mist said. 

"The double freeze 
would lower the deficit 
every year from %2ffJJ 
bilUon in FY 1983 to 
achieve a balanced budget 
at high employment by 
the end of 1986 and a 
potential $47 billion sur- 
plus during 1987-which 
would be used to g^erate 
Sr^terrsavaifx, .or cufc 
I? ;, or increase govern- 



ment spending." Carlson 
told the committee. 

"If tax cuts are con- 
sidered, they should be 
aimed at increasing sav- 
ings and investment in 
both human capital (train- 
ing and education) and 
physical capital (residen- 
tial, commercial and 
industrial structures and 
equipment)," he noted. 

This improved fiscal 
policy would allow a less 
restrictive monetary 
policy resulting in lower 
inflation, said Carlson. 
Cxxnbined with greater 
availability of savings for 
investment the reduced 
inflaticm will mean lower 
interest rates. Home 
mortgage rates, now 7 
percent to 8 percent above 
the inflation rate could be 
reducxd to a more normal 
4 percent above the rate of 
inflation, according to 
hbtional Association testi- 
mony. The lower level 
prevails in other industrial 
countries that have kept 
deficits down to reduce 
government's cwnpeting 
demand for private sav- 
ings. 

Between 1984 and 1987, 
lower real interest rates 
, would increase new home 
sales by 1.3 millioi, exist- 
ing home sales by 800.000 
and housing starts by 
323,000, according to 
National Association of 
Realtors calculations. The 
Gross National Product 
would improve by 1.1 
percent, there would be 
500,000 additicmal perma- 
nent jobs and an average 
$520 increase in wage 
earners' incomes, result- 
ing fr(xn lower interes' 
rates and inflation at.u 
. imfuoved productivity and 
iavestmeat. the calcula- 
tions show. 



Human 
Services to 
Meet 

The Chesapeake Hu- 
man Services Infonnatioii 
Network Advisory Com- 
mittee will meet on March 
15, l%3 at 11:30 a.m. at 
hfick's on Military High- 
way in ChesapeaJK. 

The program will be on 
Horticulture Resources (rf 
the Virginia Cooperative 
Extension Service. 

Tlie meeting is open to 
the public and reserva- 
tions are necessary. Call 
347-6348 to reserve a seat. 

Riviera 
Kitchens 
Establishes 
Headquarters 




The Builders 
Block 

By Dm^ WcltM* 

■mI Ertatc E«tor 

The BaiMen Block wlU 
be ■ fcatnrc MgMighURt 
Kw coMtrnciloR in 
Vlrfiaia Beach aad 
Chesapeake. 



Dan Hoffler, I^esident 
of the Armada/Hoffler 
Company, announced 
today that Riviera Kit- 
chens has established its 
headquarters in Green- 
brier Industrial and Of^ce 
Park. Formerly based in 
Florida, Riviera recently 
moved from its temporary 
headquarters in Chesa- 
peake to 6,000 square feet 
of office/industrial space 
in the Armada/Hoffler 
facility. Riviera manufac- 
tures and markets cabine- 
try thrcNighout the 50 
states and is part of the 
Shelter Productsgroup of 
Evans Products (Company. 

Evans entered the kit- 
chen cabinet business in 
1968 through the acquisi- 
tion of Red Wing, Minne- 
sota and Colorado 
Springs, Colorado. Addi- 
ticmal plants were called 
in Lancaster, (%io in 1969 
and Chester. New York ir^'-'P"" 
1972. 



This End May Be 
Your Beginning 

From Land's End, you're only eight blocto from the 
ocean, a few minutes from the expressway, and a short 
(farive puts you in the country. If this sounds good to you, 
you're in the company of a rapidly growing list <^ 
young, as well as older, professionals who have one 
thing in common, a love of leisure living. 

Land's End is designed to free you from the worry 
and drudgery of exterior home maintenance. The units 
are brick with cedar shake mansard style roofs, and the 
windows and sliding doors are resistant to the corrosive 
effects of salt air. 

Two townhome styles, with optional flomplans, and 
three garden type units, witii optional floorplans, 
comprise the Ave types of units available in the 
condominium. The garden units come eight to a 
building, the townhcmes, four. All units employ an L 
shaped design (if viewed from above the building takes 
the shape of a cross), which is quite efficient in that only 
half your walls are exterior ones, and each unit has the 
distinct advai^age of being an end unit. This design 
also allows for each unit to have a courtyard/patio, 
enclosed by a five foot wooden privacy fence. Also 
standard are detached storage sheds, wall to wall carpet, 
heat pump. and central air, energy efflcient appliances 
and generous closet space with mirrored doors. 

Land's End is the product of twenty yean of building 
experience. Ceorge Powell is the builder and developer 
who is realizing what many beach butldoi had scoffed 



at. Moderately priced, contempory uniu at the south 
end of the beach and near the ocean. "I've Uved at the 
north end for ynrs and I know nirhai beach weather can 
do to a house. Most peofrie just glance at the exterior 
and rush inside to see the ulterior and within a few 
years they'll pay for this mistake. But these brick and 
cedar shaike units can take it. Years from now, they'll 
be just as sound as when they were built, and with no 
maintenance." Powell should know, his past accom- 
plishments include: Dorchester Village, Qyndon 
Village, Willowood. Bumam Woods, Kings Grant 
Lamling North, Park Ave. <^partments, a five building 
office complex in Haygood, and Pinewood Square 
Shopping Center. Powell was abo active in Stratford 
Chase, Governor Square and Kings Grant Landing East 
and South. 

Pyle Realty, Inc. erf Virginia Beach is the marketing 
arm and driving force behind the eariy acceptance of 
Land's End. "We're available from morning to late 
afternoon and weekends to show these properties, and 
explain what condo living is. I think the word condo 
scares many people, but it shouldn't," ^aid Ann 
Hargroves, site agent for Pyle Realty. 

"I'm very pleased to be marketing Land's End. I feel 
we have a winning combination with George Powell, 
the location, the price and our agents. We have what 
the public wanu and can afford," said Roger Pyle. 
President of Pyle Realty. 

Pyle Realty is no stranger to success. They officially 
opened Station One condominium in Vvginia Beach on 
December 15th. and in less than three months, all 104 
units were sold. It appears Land's End will also be quite 
successful from early indications. Prices start at 
$44,600 and go to $66,300. 



a 

i 




Using A Hedge Effectively 



ODE 




TOWNE 



A Custom Townhouse Community in 

the Urban Tradition. We offer 

exceptional quality at 

affordable prices 




OIRECTIOMS Em hom CaprMMwr ~ 
South onto'ln<f«p«nd«nctBhd C«(H<nu« 
to N«« Ind«()«n()«nc4. turn nghi on 
SilnrlMl Or HoiMIl on Ktr 




KayAfdahl 
460-2770 



Hone 
460-1610 



Modd 
490-2356 



REALTY ONMENSIONS INC. 



Q ^ 



A HedM^ a form of 

portant' mVlPdUg todi in 
the production of livestock 
and crops, and vital man- 
agemenf piwtke for pro- 
cessors. 

Anyone owning a com- 
modity for a long pe* iod <^ 
time whether he's a pro- 
ducer, processor, or 
manufacturer, can suffer 
financial less by the own- 
ership. Adverse price 
movements on the ca^h 
market can wipe out a 
producer's profit. A sud- 
den—or steady— rise in 
the price of the commo- 

* dity required by a manu- 
facturer can undermine 
the pricing of his finished 

^product. 

A properly placed 



luedge can protect the 
limners and users d % 
cMBBiodity from such 
catastrophe. 

There are basically two 
types <tf hedges, the sell- 
ing, or short Iwdge and 
the buying, or long hedge. 

1) llie selling hedge is 
used to prcucl a commod- 
ity being produced, or in 
storage, against a {vkx 
decrease when it is evott- 
ually sdd. A cattle man 
feeding calves, a hog pro- 
ducer with a confinement 
house full of pigs, the 
farmer with a few hund- 
red acres of com, and the 
warehouse operator stor- 
ing pork bellies all own 
commodities at certain 
periods of time that are 
susceiHible to price de- 




cline. T^x 
co^tfcn 

Of^ 1 

own to asssore that j^kt 
level when they ewntual- 
ly seU the cdmiaodity on 
the cash market. 

If the cash i^ce goes 
down they recover the 
money through the fut- 
ures contract when they 
buy a contract at a kmft 
price to oflbet the one 
sold. If the futures market 
rises, the cash mshet 
always fdlows. So, if hi is 
forced to buy back h» 
futures contract at a high- 
er price, the rise in the 
cash market aShtta the 
kxs and assures the price 
he hedged at. 

2) A buying hedge is 
used to protect a user of a 



BrtJe.. 



stock J^tdtr requires a 
certain amoifflt of ctm- 
ma^m tbtMm tt a 
Mtp(l^fU0im^ pemit 
hii!^# i&he a pn^. Sixh 
Mopit buy a futures con- 
tract bi dw coBuiKidity. If 
the cash market on the 
coninodity rises, the ftit- 
ttts «r^ i^a They sell 
the contra^ teck at the 
hjflwr pri<x and receive 
Biy priM ri|e in tiK cash 
market. IT the futures 
aiarket iails, the cash 
price will abo. He buys 
the commodity at a tower 
cash prke, o^tting the 
toss in the ftature contitKt, 
and. again, assuring the 
price he hedged ai. 



LANDS END 




68 



JPERMO. 



LANDS END 




AFFORDABLE CONDOS 
AT THE BEACH 

♦Monthly Principle & Inter^t 
VHDA - 5 yr. Buy Down (Limited 
Ametmt) 

$^50.00 DOWN PAYMENT 

ADD $50 For Taxes & Insurance 

MODELS: OPEN 12-642M1W 

NIGHTS: Ann Hargroves 425-7142 

PYLE REALTY 4«.17r7 




Pyle Realty Promotes 
Virginia Beach 



Congratulations Are In 
Order For Two of Our Best 




SBvcff Awara 






Vivian Neal has been in the Real 

Estate business for six years 

and has received six - MILLION 

DOLLAR SALES AWARDS! 

This is the true test of a 

professional, to consistantly be a 

top achiever. 



^ 



Rhodes Realty, Ltd. 

Ulf r 23$5,BMkfkUBM.Om, 



m4) 492-4771 



*Wt^ 



nvfaf list wHhCEHTumr zr? 



Because wc can scM your bouse. 

• The CENTURY 21 $yst«n closes an average of 
deal every minute of the day. every day of the 
year. 

Number 1 in rec<^Bltioii 

• The CENTURY 21 system has 99% awareness 
among homebuyers and sellers. 

Number 1 in preference. 

• The CENTURY 21 system is preferred 3 to I 
over all of its national competitors conibined. 

Number 1 in advertising. 

• The CENTURY 21 system supportt its sales 
associates with •24 million in advertising - ihe 
lar^st ad program in the real estate industry. 

And more. Much more. 
Consumers believe that the 
CENTURY 21 system: 

• has the most professional and best trained sales 
associates among its natitntal ccMnpetitors. 

• can do morCtto help buyers and seUos arrant 
financing than any of iu national competitors. 
(In f«:t. we have more «(perience in this area 
than any other real esutc sales m-ganization 

anywhere.) 

• can do more than its national onnpetitors to 
move you anywiwre throughout the country. 

• can help you find a small real eute inveMnent 
property throughout the USA and Canada. 

METRO REALTY 

420-2000 

1341 S. MHtary Hwy 
<:hiilBiiiii, VA 23320 




"Quality^ 




I have noticed that i 
builders use much betta 
quality materials oa the 
exterior of the hmnes they 
build than othvs. Hie ex- 
terior of the home is ex- 
tremely important. That 
is the part that must 
fiue the elementt, which 
are hush in this area, and 
last for 30 to 50 yean. 
Unfortunately, some 
home buyers eagerly walk 
through the front door of 
the home wiihoui U4lly 
Uldng a hard k»k at the 
M»stn«:tion and quality 
t^ materials wed on the 
exterior. They are dazded 
by upgraded carp«t 
Mvl tancy extras that 
iomt iHulden u>e and 
base theff bone bttyiag 
dedsioB largely on ^ose 
fiKtors. 

Some General thii^ to 
kxA for on tiM exttrior: 
I. Door Moidings-quaHty 

<d miuerials, kwxtaks 

and poorly fitted joiitts 



2. Quality of Siding- I 
have seen some siding 
cut oo a diagonal that, 
wMIe k hm good thick- 
ness 00 one side, is thin 

enoi^ to poke your 
fbger throuf h on the 
other side. What kind 
sidii^ n used on the 
exterior? Cedar, Juni- 
per and Rednraod sid- 
ing is oMintenanM ^e 
and will last much 
longer than other types 
d wood. Better build- 
ders i»e Mck. Brida 
are maintenance free, 
wiO easfly last 40 to SO 
ytmn and are a better 
insulator. 

3. Go to the edge oS the 
builduig and k»k ak»g 
the waU fcr irregulari- 
ties in fittings aiui 

joittU. ixxk along the 
entire wall. Is it phmib 
or wavy? 

4. Beauty of the exterior te 
mpotian- ^n ccrnen 
mitered? Do architec- 
tural liiKS flow weD? 

Chimneys always add to 
arctutcaural eteganx. 
Ite boew siKJOld look 
|4es»ing and stiudy 
wUe ttitl giving con- 
vener and well engi- 
i^ered UveriHUy. 
Always take a hard look 
tt the exterior, b's criti- 
cal! 



:-iH 



.1 .; 



O 



Ig. 



MtfM 



wm^mmtmmmmmfmmmmmtmmmammmmmmmmmmmmmm 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, 1983 



Business, Real Estate ft Finance 

Consumer Dii 



est Alert 



Interest rates and the 
cost of money may well be 
the hoi potato of the 
eighties, but an alarming 
number of Americans are 
simply not paying atten- 
tion to the finer points of 
shopping for the best in- 
terest. In an article en- 
titled "Ins and Outs of In- 



terest Rates," in the Mar- 
ch/April issue of Con- 
sumers Digest, writer Don 
German hammers home 
the point: "as a consumer, 
you are now able to~and 
should-shop for loan 
rates as carefully as you 
would shop for the best 
price on a washing 



machine or refrigerator. It 
is patently foolish to save 
$100 on the purchase of an 
item, and then pay $200 in 
additional finance charges 
by failing to shop for 
lower rates." 

According to German, 
many consumers are 
pressured by the "heat of 



Financial Planning. .. 

The 

Key To 

Success 



the moment": A home is 
available, so buy now! 
The roof has to be fix^ 
for the next rain! So most 
borrowers will ask only 
two questions: Can I get 
the loan? What is the 
monthly payment? Con- 
sumers Digest emphasizes 
the need to ask a third 
question: How much will 



the loan cost-in the 
long run? 

For mortgages. Con- 
sumers Digest advises to 
both shop for the best 
rates and the shortest term 
mortgage that is 
possible. Also, never sign 
a mortgage with a 
prepayment penalty, or 
one that doesn't allow 



prepayment, which is 
another way of saving 
long term money. When 
you can afford to. Con- 
sumers Digest advises to 
make your current mor- 
tgage payment, plus the 
amount of principal on 
the last payment on the 
amortization schedule, 
which the lender wiU give 



By Madeline Fortuaato 

Financial Planning has 
become: a very important 
and necessary tool fw 
successful money man- 
agemettt. Families , 
individuals, and corpora- 
tions as well as small 



enterprises benefit fiom a 
confidential plan and per- 
sonal interview with a 
qualified planner. 

A good financial plan- 
ner will help you to 
achieve tomorrow's goals 
today. TTiese goals vary. 
For some it's reducing 
taxable income, for 
others, it's providing 
additional income at 
retirement with ccmtinued 
growth on the original 
principal. For most people 
it's whether your dollars 
are working as hard and 
as smart for you as they 
should be. What ever your 
goals may be, it is impo-- 
tant to accumulate those 



dollars in the best vehicle 
suitable to your objec- 
tives. 

How you choose your 
Tmancial planner is impor- 
tant. Sonne charge a fee 
for their personal time and 
services on the plan. 
Some, through their com- 
panies can offer it at no 
cost. In either case, 
usually commissions are 
earned by the planner if 
you dan see the advan- 
tages of following through 
on the recommendations 
made. 

The key to success, 
most importantly, is to not 
procrastinate! 



GSHAttends 

A Winner At 21! 



Goodman Segar Hogan 
Residential Sales Cor- 
poration was present at 
the International Conven- 
tion of Nationwide 
Relocation Service, Inc. 
held from February 27 - 
March 3 in Las Vegas. 
Nearly 300 real estate 
brokers and their guests 
from the United States, 
Canada, and the United 
Kingdom convened to ad- 
dress the subject of the 
progress of the relocation 
industry and how it per- 
tains to their individual 
businesses. 

"A Winner at Twenty- 
One!" was the theme for 



the convention, which 
recognized the 

organization's twenty first 
birthday. From its incep- 
tion in 1962, Nationwide 
has grown to over 600 
broker members with 
more than 20,000 sales 
associates in four coun- 
tries. The organization is 
dedicated to giving service 
to families who transfer 
and to companies that 
regularly relocate person- 
nel. 

Among the prominent 
speakers at the cdnvention 
were Harley Snyder, 
President of the National 
Association of 



Realtors; Washington Post 
syndicated real estate 
columinist Kenneth R. 
Harney: Dr. Stephen 
Covey, Associate 
Professor of 

Organizational Behavior 
and Business Maiiagement 
at ' Brigham Young 
University; the relocation 
consulting firm team of 
Richard J. Seals and Bill 
Heald, Dallas, TX; and 
Joe E. Hanauer, Coldwell 
Banker Residential Group 
Senior Vice-President. 

The four day conven- 
tion also featured 
workshops and brain- 
storming sessions during 
which participants shared 
successful methodology 
employed in their respec- 
tive real estate businesses. 



you, usually for a $10 ser- 
vice fee. 

Consumers can save 
finance charges on in- 
stallment loans by 
following the Consumers 
Digest mortgage rule- 
shop low rates and go for 
the short term. The loan- 
shopper should check 
several banks, particularly 
where he/she already has 
an account, for rates-and 
ask for the lowest rates. 
Credit Unions may offer 
comparable loan oppor- 
tunities. It is also possible 
to borrow against a life in- 
surance policy for low 
rates. 

Borrowers should also 
inv^tigate a one-payment 
loan, with the entire 
balance due on maturity. 
Though it costs a higher 
interest rate, you'll have 
the money longer, and can 
invest it in a highyield' 
money bearing account, 
offsetting the cost of the 
Toan. . 



Credit cards enable 
Americans to live high on 




IRA "Blitz" At Peoples Bank 



lRA"Blitz" slated for 
March 26th and April 2nd 
at People's Bank of 
Chesapeake. 

The Tax Man cometh... 
and People's Bank of 
Chesapeake is helping to 
take the confusion out of 
understanding bidividual 



Retirement Accounts by 
holding "schod" on Sat- 
urday, March 26th and 
i^ril 2nd at three of their 
locaticMis. 

According to Townsend 
Oast, President of 
Pec^le's Bank, highpoints 
of the "blitzes" will in- 



clude facts on minimum 
deposits, instalhnent pos- 
sibilities, tax savings, and 
funding IRA's with low 
interest loans. "We're 
anxicHis to help Chesa- 
peake's citizens under- 
stand IRAs and to assist 
them in every possible 
way to make the best use 



of their investments." 

The three People's 
Bank branches open for 
the Saturday IRA sessions 
are Great Bridge, Green- 
brier and Deep Creek. 
Times are 9:00 AM until 
6:00 PM on Saturday, 
March 26 and Saturday, 
i^ril 2. 



Consolidate Your Bills 

24 HOUR APPROVAL 

Home Owner Loans 



• Complete Appication 
over phone 



•Deal Directly 
with Lender 



PEOPLE'S BANK 

We\e all the hank you'll ever need. 

'. Sinu' /// 1966 

GREAT ailDGE: 320 Battlefield Boulevard SoutkDEEP CREEK: 1 124 Geoi^e Washington Highway NortKEDMONDS CORNER: 2030 

Battlefield Boulevard North.GREENBRIER: Battlefield Boulevard at Vdvo Parkway.CHURCHLAND: 3353 Wtstern Branch Boulevard 

in Farm FreshSCXTTH MILITARY HIGHWAY; 2005 South Military Highway, K-Mart Center, in Farm Fresh. 

LYNNHAV'EN: 453 South Lynnhaven Road, in Virginia Beach 

MEMBER FDIC 




9-6 pm M-F 

9-1 pm Sat. 



LANDBANK EQUITY CORP. 

CaU 1080 Laskin Rd. Va. Beach. Va. 23451 
Today ((04)425-6621 



Sl\( E 1886, M'V E 
MET UDEWMER'S 

nw^ciAL \b*;ds. 

WE'RE STII l\ 
(iROWI\(i TO MEET 
VOIRS. 



See us for lewarding savings plans and 
J. specialized loans. 

Homel^deml 

Savir^ and ban Association 

erf Norfolk Org4n r zrd 1886 

MMnOffiM: TOOBotMhStrael. Norfolli.\*/627-e431 

Bnneh Officas: Thomas Comer / PortsmouUi ' 

NeMpott News/ Hampton i Suffolk ' Hilltop 

DcnIHfh / GrsM Br idge ' Grafton 







J^idawaui 

Gmphic supplies & services 



Specialing in: 
•Drafting Supplies 
•Furniture 
•Blueprinting 
•Copying 
•Dry Mounting 

•Xerox Enlargement and Reductions 
•Engineering Photography 
•fs&i Dependable Service 





V 



FREE PICK-UP & 
DELIVERY 

5001 Cleveland St. 
Va. Beach. VA 23462 

490-2305 

Serving the architect, engineer, designer 
and industry over 50 years 




k Personalized Hnanciai 
Plan tailorad speciiicaily 
for youriamily 

Are you really satisfied that your family's financial program 
IS totally adequate fox today and for the future? Have you 
realistically considered those bothersome, confusing details 
that can seriously affect your plans— inflation taxes 
Social Security? Does your present method o( savings, 
investments ar>d life insurance ownership allow you to make 
maximum use of your after-tax dollars? 

Now there's an easy way to create a realistic financial plan 
for you and your family through our personalized Financial 
Planning Service. 

Here's How It Works 

1. Wo collect data from you corKerning your assets, your 
needs, your obiectives 

2. This information is processed through our computers- 
programmed by specialists in the fields of investments, 
insurance and financial planning— correlating inflatiortary 
factors and Social S«curity benefits 

3 You eceive a confidential 15- to 2S-pa^ report offering 
firm, realistic recommendations for your family's finan- 
cial program, based on your holdings, your needs, your 
budgetary limitations and your objectives 

THERE IS NO CHARGE KM THIS SERVICE . . . 

AND YOU ARE UNI^R NO OBLIGATION 

WHATEVBI TO BUY ANYTHING. 

WADDELL & REED, INC. 

3 LyealMVM EmcmUvc Park 

sei^zas 

Vlr^iiia BeKh, VA Z34S2 

Call 
Madeline Fortunato 
463-3081 





HinlUd <£Mfina^e,intnt ^xoufi, Una. 
donsuLlarUi 

United Management Group, Inc. is 
a financial and management 
consulting firm assisting 
individuals, small businesses and 
corporations in ultimate 
profitability and optimum 
efficiency. 




•MORTGAGE LOANS 

•SIGNATURE LOANS FOR PROFESSIONAL 

AND BUSINESS PEOPLE 

•DEVELOP UNES OF CREDrT 

•PROVIDE TAX AND ACCOUNTING 

SERVICES 

Hours By Appointment 
804-486-7116 

Yorktown Commerce Center 

228 N. Lynnhaven Rd. 

Suite 117 A 

Virginia BeacK Va. 23452 



THE 

BEACH 

SATURDAY 

BANK. 




SATURDAY HOURS 

DRIVE-IN LOBBY 

8:30 am- 12 pm 9 am -12pm 



VIRGINIA BEACH LOCATIONS 



BAYSltttOTFlCE 

t«l2 ImlcpcfidciKt Uvd. 

TIME MACHINE (24 how t 

CHINESE CORNER OFFICE 

S0ISVir^iii>aaKliH<4. 

INDIAN RIVER OFFICE 

tZIIIiHttu River Row! 

KEMPSVILLE OFFICE 

SDI PriBccn Amk ll(»d 

TIME MACHINE 04 how bnlihit) 



LASKIN ROAD OFF ICE 

ItMUBkiilRowl 

TIME MACHINE (24 hour iMnliii^) 

LYNNHAVEN WFKE 

2777 Vifiiiiia Icai.'h Bl<tf , 

TIME MACHINE (24 hour builMnU 

KJNGO OFFICE 

Pi^loSMiian 

SMOtE DRIVE OFFICE 

2tWSlKmI>m 

TIME MACHINE (24 hovrh«ftlin,| 



:8 



the hog conveniently- 
but they too are loans, and 
should be treated as such. 
To avoid the "credit card 
trap". Consumers Digest 
suggests: 

•Find the lowest annual 
fee. Some banks charge 
$15, some $20, and a few 

still charge nothing at all 
to regular customers.^ 

•Shop for rates. All 
credit cards are not equal, 
contrary to popular belief. 
Though most banks 
charge the maximum set 
by state law, some banks 
have moved their 
headqiiarters to South 
Dakota where there is no 
limit, and customers of 
such a bank pay 23% in- 
stead of the usual 18<^o on 
unpaid balance. 

•Look for a bank that 
offers a grace period, 
usually 25 days, aiul try to 
pay as much of the 
charges accrued within 
that period, as you can. 



•Pay as much as 
possible on your bill every .^.^^ 
month. 



t 

4'i 






) 
1 

3.' 

■A 






For Informatioii, Call 466-2615 

Hours of (^ration 
Moaday throagk Friday 

Drive-la LoMy 

%m%.m.4i9.m. MM.-M 9a.ai.-2#.H. Moh.-tIim 



The Bulk Thai Works fw Virginjaps. 

rFDK. 



4 












■kH 



mmm 



qaa^ 



IWjH-Ji 



JWMiW* 



TiMCliurcli 

ItTlMpMpI* 



Church Hews 



Virginia Beach Sun. Marcl) 16, 19t3 15 



Ai^nwCliwch 




CHURCH 
BULLETINS' 



This ministry 
also operates 
Dial-A-Praycr, 
which is 

available twen- 
ty-four hours a 
day and broad- 
casts Suivday 
morning services 
over WCPK- 
1600 on the AM 
dial at 11:00 
a.m. 



History Of 
First Baptist 
Church of 
Norfolk 

First Baptist Church of 
Norfolk, Virginia was 
organized as Cumberland 
Street Baptist Church in 
1805, the first sndces 
being held in a rented hall 
on Cumberland Street. On 
October 1, 1886 the name 
was officially changed to 
First Baptist Church, 
Cumberland Street. 

In April 1893 the church 
building of the Epworth 
Methodist Church on 
Oranby Street was pur- 
chased at a cost of 
$27,000. 

Due to its proximity to 
business locations, this 
building was sold in 1906 
and property purchased at 
the comer of Westover 
and Mo-an Avenues. Ded- 
ication services for a large 
granite gothic-style 
church building were held 
on June 21, 1910, the 
oiginal building being 
ox^structed at a cost of 
$68,213.81. 



During these years the 
Church cmitinued to ex- 
perience growth and in 
1956, the Church began a 
mission wwk in the Thalia 
area of Virjginia Beach, 
the same being constitut- 
ed as Thalia Lynn Baptist 
Church on June 30, 1957. 




Rev. Hemphiil's Philoso phy 

^*Keep It Simple 



JJ 



KcancIbS.HcmpMII 

jvgain in 1959 a major 
expansion program was 
necessary and additional 
property was purchased, 
the auditorium remodeled 
education area expanded 
to accommodate 1000 
people, and a taping and 
broadcasting facility was 
added. Beginning in the 
late 1950's and continuing 
through the 1960's, Nor- 
folk experienced an 
exodus of an urban 
population moving to the 
suburbs. This resulted in a 
declining membership. On 
Sunday, October 2. 1%9, 
fire completely destroyed 
the sanctuary and party of 
the educational structures, 
educational structures. 

For a period of time 
services were held at the 
Lakewood Elementary 
School and the Freemason 
Street Baptist Church. In 
March 1971 the present 
seven acre site of land was 
purchased and in 1972 
construction began on the 
present 700 seat audi- 
torium. 



"Reach people for 
Christ and equip them in 
the word," is Dr. Kenneth 
Ifemphill's "keep it sim- 
ple" philosophy for 
Christian descipleship. 
Rev. Hemphill, pastor of 
The First Baptist Church 
of Norfolk, has a large 
vision and passion to 
minister to the entire 
Tidewater community. 

There is an infectious 
sense of excitement 
among the First Baptist 
family resulting from an 
unusual 80% growth rate 
since Feb. 1981. A prime 
location in the heart of 
Tidewater provides an 
unparalleled opportunity 
to reach people fa- Christ. 
Even more exciting than 
the location is the 
strength of the ministries 
through excellent lay- 
leadership. 

Pastor Hemphill's plan 
to reach peqjlc f<x Christ 
will be accomplished 
through a specially de- 
signed program structur- 
ed around Descipleship 
Ministry. This plan will be 
conducted in four phases. 

(I) Study The Bible— In 
Studying the bible, Rev. 
Hemphill has designed a 
program of Bible Study 
which enables each indi- 
vidual to grow in the 
knowledge of Oirist. The 
Sunday School Bible stu- 
dies luve an average at- 
tendance of 784 members, 
reaching aU the needs of 
the congregation, includ- 



Indlan River Baptist Church 

If I Should Die brings together some 
very respected Christian doctors, 
'^theologians and psychologists to in- 
vestigate this subject and how it relates to 
history's most consistent textbook on 
death and dying - THE BIBLE. 

The fibn will be shown March 27 ^ 
7:30 p.in. ^ '^ ■ ^ ^* 



Church Of Tlie Asccniioa 

On March 26 from 9 am. to 3: IS pm., a 
program, to help Girl Scout leaders and 
other interested adults understand critical 
problems impacting on today's child. 

The church is located on^33 Priscns 
Anne Road in Virginia Beiu^h. 



LOOKING FOrCOD 



Some $ay you find God just as well In a garden, ti 
the woods, or on a golf course as in a church — tlmt 
God is everywhere. But be honest about it. 

Are you not more apt to think of weeds, or 
mosquitoes, or a poor shot than ytm 0rt of God? 
And qfter all, you have made this outing to seek 
plemtre. 

But when you go to church, it Is with the specific 
intention of worshipping. Here you engine in prayer, 
praiu and thanksgiving. Here you mingle with 
people who are seeking God and have come to feel 
His presence. In the quiet beauty of a mnetuary you 
fMfewou^thdl^ractit^andyou 
know that this place Is (M^Ued to the 
servl^ofGod. 

For /woe* aiui luppbtess whkh 
comes from reaUy feeUi^ God*s 
presence, worship in tlu houu of 
the Lord this w»k — amke it a 
r^ular practice. 




Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesdi 


Matthew 


Mark 


Ijjke 


John 


11:1-19 


12:18-27 


7:11-17 


11:1-16 



Thursday 

John 
11:28-44 



Friday 

Luke 

24:1-12 



Saturday 

Luke 
24:36-49 



Cedar l^oad ^6imnibl^ of Qod 




•KCeMRROM 
OMATMIOQE 



iHtfNONC Mr-M(1 w 



unam 



I) ltJla.a. 

y«UiA*ito..7:3tpjB. 
Fwib^NI^7Ji>ji. 



HThe 
Open Door (m) 34o-i44i 
Oiapd 

3177 Va. BeKb Blvd., Va. BcmIi, Va., 23452 

SUNDAY TUESDAY 

SwiaySAMi »:1SAM liUcSW^ I«HNAM 

Wonh^SMvfec fcMAM 

....WMMM WEDNESDAY 

PraiwScnrIn fcMm MM-«crit8cfvicc....7:«PM 



\ 



^ > PI 



.^^ 



^S f ABf}/^^ 



^C. 



'%. Barn " i 



PROVIDENCE ROAD - VIRCWIA SEACM. VIRCWIA 

, i!,M„., H.rj^ K.«i,j^ —J i.^««. *>j«' *— " , 



<? 



Pastor: Rev. John R. Carrawakr 
Phone 424-2276 



Ing a MentiUy Retarded 
class and monthly class 
for Vietnamese. The 
entire training program is 
aimed to practical instruc- 
tions in Christian living 
and in personal ministry. 
The Sunday Schod mini- 
stries attempt to build a 
strong church by spread- 
ing God's word through, 
reading, teaching, win- 
ning and developing dis- 
ciples. 

(2) Prayer and Wor- 
ship— lYit Prayer and 
Worship program, meets 
the basic needs (tf every 
age group through effec- 
tive prayer fo increase an 
inner personal relation- 
ship with Christ and a 
period of Worship which 
will encourage and uplift 
every member. 

(3) Share Your Faith— 
Sharing your foith, is the 
reason First Baptist has 
experienced a substantial 
growth by telling others 
about Jesus Christ. The 
First Baptist family is 
committed to an emphasis 
on evangelism and out- 
reach, hi explaining the 
basic doctrine of the 
church Rev. Hemphil 
says, "public profession 
of faith and believers 
baiAism are prerequisites 
of membership. Each 
Christian has direct ac- 
cess to God through 
Christ. The ultimate 
soitrce of authority in 
Jesus Christ the Lord, and 
every area of life is sub- 



^^ef^rtt Lordship. The 
Bible is the impired reve- 
lation of God's wiU and 
way. It is our authoritative 
rule of faith and |tf«c- 
tice. 

(4J Discover Your Gift 
and Use h— Discovering 
your gift and using it is an 
area that all Christians 
should seek "What can I 
do best and how can I do it 
to please God." 

Another ministry of 
First Baptist n in church 
training which enccHn- 
passes courses in Mble 
Study, "ACTS" Adult 
Christian Training Ses- 
sions, and two Youth 
classes. 

The music ministry pro- 
vides a complete gniided 
choir program consisting 
of 9 (nine) choirs (104 
enrolled in Uie adult cirair, 
66 enrolled in the Youth 
choir and 142 enrolled 
in childrens dioir). Spe- 
cial groups include Youth 
and Adult ensenbles, 
various duets, trios and 
quartets; and organized 
HandbeU choirs for child- 
ren, youth and adults. 
First Baptist started its 
own orchestra this year 
with 12 regular memben 
performing at the jHresent 
time. 

In February 1981, Or. 
Kenneth S. HemphiU be- 
came pastor ct this 874- 
member church which 
was organized in 1803. 
Today's membenihip to- 
tals 2018. 




On The Gi^JCoum? 
In The Woods? 
In A Garden? 
In Your Church? 




N«w8— diyitoratuWnnMyl.WiaB. 

llin*nW<wMpUija. 
E*Mk«WonMp7p.a. 

Ken HtmpMU, Pastor 

, NwfMk. Va., 21M1 4tl-tm 




CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

4925 Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard Campbell, Pastor 

495-1004 
Youth L.I.F.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. 




OMmmiS 



nmoAV 

•sMAJM. 

MMAJt. 




H. L. Kay, Pastor T^Btty R. 'ThOtms,Astocmle Peslor 



Kings Grant Baptist Church 

873 Little Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



SUNDAV 

S— dnScfcool Maa.aN 

f SchOn* * ■ . > lv4v Safll. 



WDWESDAY 

CmtttCWinm'a 

Clafci.. .....4Jif,i 

Prayer Sendee fc^p.i 



Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
3404)902 




will&baumer' 



AathMind Deafer 

See us for your 
special Easter Needs 



Candles 



Longs Religious 
Supply 

trfto Ave, WdiWfc. Va. 




4M «mr4 noN 19 nKHMTurs 

ttOOLmmlAymm 
CftM^Mto, Vte., 2392S 

P/mtt W. McSmrim, Jr. PtMor 
424^700 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, 1985 



wmmmtmmm 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



Consumer Digest Alert 



interest rates and the 
cost of money may well be 
the hot potato of the 
eighties, but an alarming 
number of Arnericans are 
simply not paying atten- 
tion to the finer points of 
shopping for the best in- 
terest. In an article en- 
titled "Ins and Outs of In- 



terest Rates," in the Mar- 
ch/April issue of Con- 
sumers Digest, writer Don 
German hammers home 
the point: "as a consumer, 
you are now able to-and 
should--shop for loan 
rates as carefully as you 
would shop for the best 
price on a washing 



machine or refrigerator. It 
is patently foolish to save 
$100 on the purchase of an 
item, and then p^y $200 in 
additional finance charges 
by failing to shop for 
lower rates." 

According to German, 
many consumers are 
pressured by the "heat of 



Financial Planning... 



the moment": A home is 
available, so buy now! 
The roof has to be fixed 
for the next rain! So most 
borrowers will ask only 
two questions: Can I get 
the loan? What is the 
monthly payment? Con- 
sumers Digest emphasizes 
the need to ask a third 
question: How much will 



the loan cost-in the 
long run? 

For mortgages. Con- 
sumers Digest advises to 
both shop for the best 
rates and the shortest term 
mortgage that is 
possible. Also, never sign 
a mortgage with a 
prepayment penalty, or 
one that doesn't allow 



prepayment, which is 
another way of saving 
long term money. When 
you can afford to. Con- 
sumers Digest advises to 
make your current mor- 
tgage payment, plus the 
amount of principal on 
the last payment on the 
amortization schedule, 
which the lender will give 




Key To 
Success 

By Madeline Fortunato 



Financial Planning has 
become a very important 
and necessary tool fw 
successi\il money man- 
agement. Families, 
individuals, and corpota- 
tions as well as smaU 



enterprises benefit from a 
confidential plan and per- 
swial interview with a 
qualified planner. 

A good financial plan- 
ner will help you to 
achieve tomorrow's goals 
today. These goals vary. 
For some it's reducing 
taxable income, for 
others, it's providing 
additional income at 
retirement with continued 
growth on the original 
principal. For most pec^le 
it's whether your dollars 
are working as hard and 
as smart for yoa as they 
should be. What ever your 
goals may be, it is impor- 
tant to accumulate those 



dollars in the best vehicle 
suitable to your objec- 
tives. 

How you choose your 
financial planner is impor- 
tant. Some charge a fee 
for their personal time and 
services on the plan. 
Some, through their com- 
panies can offer it at no 
cost. In either case, 
usually commissions are 
earned by the planner if 
you dan see the advan- 
tages of following through 
on the recommendaticsis 
made. 

The key to success, 
most importantly, is to not 
procrastinate! 



GSH Attends 

A Winner At 21! 



Goodman Segar Hogan 
Residential Sales Cor- 
poration was present at 
the International Conven- 
tion of Nationwide 
Relocation Service, Inc. 
held from February 27 - 
March 3 in Las Vegas. 
Nearly 300 real estate 
brokers and their guests 
from the United States, 
Canada, and the United 
Kingdom convened to ad- 
dress the subject of the 
progress of the relocation 
industry and how it per- 
tains to their individual 
businesses. 

"A Winner at Twenty- 
One!" was the theme for 



the convention, yvhich 
recogni:i;ed the 

organization's twenty first 
birthday. From its incep- 
tion in 1962, Nationwide 
has grown to over 600 
broker members with 
more than 20,000 sales 
associates in four coun- 
tries. The organization is 
dedicated to giving service 
to families who transfer 
and to companies that 
regularly relocate person- 
nel. 

Among the prominent 
speakers at the cdnvention 
were Harley Snyder, 
President of the National 
Association of 



Realtors; Washington Post 
syndicated real estate 
coiuminist Kenneth R. 
Harney; Dr. Stephen 
Covey, Associate 
Professor of 

Organizational Behavior 
and Business Management 
at ' Brigham Young 
University; the relocation 
consulting firm team of 
Richard J. Seals and Bill 
Heald, Dallas. TX; and 
Joe E. Hanauer, Coldwell 
Banker Residential Group 
Senior Vice-President. 

The four day conven- 
tion also featured 
workshops and brain- 
storming sessions during 
which participants shared 
successful methodology 
employed in their respec- 
tive real estate businesses. 



you, usually for a $10 ser- 
vice fee. 

Consumers can save 
finance charges on in- 
stallment loans by 
following the Consumers 
Digest mortgage rule- 
shop low rates and go for 
the short term. The loan- 
shopper should check 
several banks, particularly 
where he/she alre»ly has 
an account, for rates~and 
ask for the lowest rates. 
Credit Unions may offer 
comparable loan oppor- 
tunities. It is also possible 
to borrow against a life in- 
surance policy for low 
rates. 



Borrowers should also 
investigate a one-payment 
loan, with the entire 
balance due on maturity. 
Though it costs a higher 
interest rate, you'll have 
the money longer, and can 
invest it in a highyield- 
money bearing account, 
offsetting the cost of the 
loan. 



Credit cards enable 
Americans to live high on 



the hog conveniently - 
but they too are loans, and 
should be treated as such. 
To avoid the "credit card 
trap", Consumers Digest 
suggests: 

•Find the lowest annual 
fee. Some banks charge 
$15, some $20, and a few 

still charge nothing at all 
to regular customers. 

•Shop for rates. All 
credit cards are not equal, 
contrary to popular belief. 
Though most banks 
charge the maximum set 
by state law, some banks 
have moved their 
headqiiarters to South 
Dakota where there is no 
limit, and customers of 
such a bank pay 23% in- 
stead of the usual 18<^o on 
unpaid balance. 

•Look for a bank that 
offers a grace period,, 
usually 25 days, and try to 
pay as much of the 
charges accrued within 
that period, as you can. 

•Pay as much as 
possible on your bill every 
month. 




PEORLE'S BANK 

We're oil the bank you'll ever need. 

.Sma-///(%6 

GREAT fflUDGE: 320 Battlefield Boulevard SoutkDEEP CREEK: 1124 Geor^ WashinKton Highway NortKEIDMONDS CORNER: 2030 

BatflefieU Boulevard North.GREENBRJER: Battlefield Boulevard at Vdvo Parkway.CHURCHLAND: 3353 VMestem Branch Boulevard 

in Farm Fresh50UTH MILITARY HIGHWAY: 2005 South Military Highway, K-Mart Center, in Farm Fresh. 

LYNNHA\'EN: 453 South Lynnhaven Road, in Virginia Beach 

MEMBER FDIC 



Graphic supplies & services 



Specialing in: 
•Drafting Supplies 
•Furniture 
•Blueprinting 
•Copying 
•Dry Mounting 

•Xerox Enlargement and Reductions 
•Engineering Photography 
•Fast Dependable Service 





V 



freepiCk-up& 
delivery 

5001 Clevela^ St. 
Va. Beach, VA 23462 

490-2305 

Serving the architect, engineer, designer 
and industry over 50 years 




A Personalized Rnancial 
nan tailored spociiicany 
for your ftimily 

Are you really ^tisfied that your family's financial program 
is totally adeqiiate for today and for the future? Have you 
realistically considered those bothersome, confusing details 
that can serioi^sly affect your plans— inflation taxes 
Social Security'' Does your present method of savings, 
investments and life insurance ownership allow you to make 
maximum use of your after-tax dollars? 

Now there's an easy way to create a realistic financial plan 
for you and your family through our personalized Financial 
Planning Service 7 

Here's How It Works 

1 We collect data from you concerning your assets, your 
needs, your objectives 

2. This information is processed through our computers- 
programmed by specialists in the fields of investments, 
insurance and financial planning— correlating inflationary 
factors and Social Socurity benefits 

3 You eceive a confidential 15- to 25-page report offering 
firm, realistic recommendations for your family's finan- 
cial program, based on your holdings, your needs, your 
budgetary limitations and your objectives 

THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR THIS SERVICE . . . 

AND YOU ARE UNDBI NO OM.IGATION 

WHATEVER TO BUY ANYTHING. 

WADDELL & REED, INC. 

3 Lrmkav«ii EJwc«thc Pail 

Salens 
Vln^ria Bewk, VA 23452 | 

CaU 
Madeline Fortunato 
463-3081 




IRA * 'Blitz'' At Peoples Bank 



IRA"Blitz" slated for 
March 26th and April 2nd 
at People's Bank of 
Chesapeake. 

TTie Tax Man cometh... 
and People's Bank of 
Chesapeake is helping to 
take the confusion out of 
understanding Individual 



Retirement Accounts by 
holding "schod" on Sat- 
urday, March 26th and 
April 2nd at three of their 
locations. 

According to Townsend 
Oast, President of 
People's Bank, highpdnts 
of the "blitzes" will in- 



Consolidate Your Bills 

24 HOUR APPROVAL 

Home Owner Loans 

• Complete Appication •Deal Directly 

over phone with Lender 




9-6 pm M-F 
9-1 pm Sat. 



LANDBANK EQUITY CORP. 

Call 1080 Laskin Rd. Va. Beach, Va. 234S1 
Today (804)425-6621 




United y^ana^tmtnt ^tou^ Dne. 
ComuLlanli 

United Management Group, Inc. is 
a financial and management 
consulting Hrm assisting 
individuals, small businesses and 
corporations in ultimate 
proHtability and optimum 
efficiency. 




•MORTGAGE LOANS 

•SIGNATURE LOANS FOR PROFESSIONAL 

AND BUSINE^ PEOPLE 

•DEVELOP LINES OF CREDIT 

•PROVIDE TAX AND ACCOUNTING 

SERVICES 



Hours By Appointment 
804-486-7116 



Yorktown Commerce Center 

228 N. Lynnhaven Rd. 

Suite 117A 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 



elude facts on minimum 
deposits, installment pos- 
sibilities, tax savings, and 
funding IRA's with low 
interest loans. "We're 
anxious to help Chesa- 
peake's citizens under- 
stand IRAs and to assist 
them in every possible 
way to make the best use 



of their investments." 

The three People's 
Bank branches c^n fcnr 
the Saturday IRA sessions 
are Great Bridge, Green- 
brier and Deep Creek. 
Times are 9:00 AM until 
6:00 PM on Saturday, 
March 26 and Saturday, 
April 2. 



Sl^( E 1886, \ITTE 
MET TIDEW/fER'S 

Fi\A\ciAi, \be;ds. 

WE'RE STII l\ 
(iROWING TO ^tEET 
YOIRS. 



See lis for rewarding savings plans and 
specialized loans. 




Home F^iHl 

Savir^ and loan Association 



of Norfolk Oiginized 188* 

IMn Office: TOOBoushSiieet.Norfolk.MV '6276431 

Brancti Office*: Thomas Comer / Portsmoutti ' 

Nawinn News ' Hampton i Suffolk ' f^ilitop 

OenOigh / Greet Bridge ' Gtafton 



ttlSl 



THE 

BEACH 

SATURDAY 

BANK. 




SATURDAY HOURS 

DRIVE-IN LOBBY 

8:30 am -12 pm 9 am -12 pm 

VIRGINIA BEACH LOCATIONS 



BAVSIDE OFFICE 

Itl2 Indcpcmknct Blvd. 

TIME MACHINE (24 Iwur beiikii«) 

CHINESE CORNER OFFICE 

JOISVirtiai«l<wkH«d. 

INDIAN RIVER OFFICE 

(21J IikNui Rivtf Roed 

KEMPSVILU OFFICE 

Sill Priacat Aunt Read 

TIME MACHINE (14 hour l)«akii«) 



LASWNROADOFFICE 

■tot Laskia Road 

TIME MACHINE (24 luur bankinii 

LYNNHAVEN OFFICE 

rm Virfiaia Beadi Bl«d 

HME MACHINE (24 hour twakint) 

PUNGOOFFICl 

Pyi^D Station 

SHfMlE DRIVE OFFIt L 

2W5SiwnDri%T 

nME MACHINE (Mhourloniint) 



For Informatioii, Call 466-2615 

Hours of Operatioii 
MoMbiy threagk Friday 



Drivc-lB 

t:M«.M.-«9.i 



Lobfcy 

•fW 94.M.-2P.M. Mmi..TIi^ 
H^..2p.«i..3:3»^.Bi. irt 











AS. 



) 
\ 



5/ 

Ob 



so 



The tenk TTat W<wks f« Virginians. 









m^^ 



mm 



iMPvni 



-^fr^m^m^mm 



^g^m^^^^mmi^^mm 



Th* Church 
ltTh«Pt«pl« 



Church Hews 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, 1M3 IS 



Th«P«opl« 
Ar« Th« Church 



Rev. Hem phJirA 




CHURCH 
BULLETINS 



This ministry 
also operates 
Dial-A-Prayer, 
which is 

available twen- 
ty-four hours a 
day and broad- 
casts Sunday 
morning services 
over WCPK- 
1600 on the AM 
dial at 11:00 
a.m. 



History Of 
First Baptist 
Church of 
Norfolk 

First Baptist Church of 
Norfolk, Virginia was 
oi^anized as Qimberland 
Street Baptist Church in 
1805, the first srviccs 
being held in a rented hall 
on Cumberland Street. On 
October 1, 1886 the name 
was officially changed to 
First Baptist Church, 
Cumberland Street. 

Inw^ril 189S the church 
building of the Epworth 
Methodist Church on 
Gk'anby Street was pur- 
chased at a cost of 
$27,000. 

Due to its proximity to 
business locations, this 
building was sold in 1906 
and property purchased at 
the cwner of Westover 
and Moran Avenues. Ded- 
ication semces for a large 
granite gothic-style 
church building were held 
on June 21, 1910, the 
niginal building being 
constructed at a cost of 
$68,213.81. 



During these years the 
Church coitinued to ex- 
perience growth and in 
19S6, the Church began a 
missicxi work in the Thalia 
area of Virjginia Beach, 
the same being constitut- 
ed as Thalia Lynn Baptist 
Church en June 30, 1957. 




**Keep It Simple 



JJ 



KdiBclbS.HcniiUII 

<\gain in 1959 a majcH' 
expansion program was 
necessary and additional 
property was purchased, 
the auditorium remodeled 
education area expanded 
to accommodate 1000 
people, and a taping and 
broadcasting facility was 
added. Beginning in the 
late 1950's and continuing 
through the 1960's, Nor- 
folk , experienced an 
exodus of an urban 
population moving to the 
suburbs. This resulted in a 
declining membership. On 
Sunday, October 2, 1969, 
fire completely destroyed 
the sanctuary and party of 
the educational structures, 
educational structures. 

For a period of time 
services were held at the 
Lakewood Elementary 
School and the Freemason 
Street Baptist Church, hi 
March 1971 the present 
seven acre site of land was 
purchased and in 1972 
construction began on the 
present 700 seat audi- 
tmum. 



"Reach people for 
Christ and equip them in 
the word," is Dr. Kenneth 
HeftiphiU's "keep it sim- 
ple" philosophy for 
Christian descipleship. 
Rev. Hemphill, pastor of 
The First Baptist Church 
of Norfolk, has a large 
vision and passion to 
minister to the entire 
Tidewater community. 

There is an infectious 
sense of excitement 
among the First Baptist 
family resulting from an 
unusual 80fo growth rate 
since Feb. 1981. A prime 
location in the heart of 
Tidewater provides an 
unparalleled opportunity 
to reach people for Christ. 
Even more exciting than 
the location is the 
strength of the ministries 
through excellent lay- 
leadership. 

Pastor Hemphill's plan 
to reach people for Christ 
will be accomplished 
through a specially de- 
signed program structur- 
ed around Descipleship 
Ministry. This plan will be 
conducted in four phases. 

(0 Study The Bible— In 
Studying the bible. Rev. 
Hemphill has designed a 
pr(%ram of Bible Study 
which enables each indi- 
vidual to grow in the 
knowledge oS Christ. Hw 
Sunday School Bible stu- 
dies have an average at- 
tendance of 784 members, 
reaching all the needs of 
the congregation, includ- 



ing a Mentally Retarded 
class and monthly class 
for Vietnamese. The 
entire training program is 
aimed to practical instnu:- 
tions in Christian living 
and in personal ministry. 
The Sunday Schod mini- 
stries attempt to build a 
strong church by spread- 
ing God's word through, 
reading, teaching, win- 
ning and develq^ing dis- 
ciples. 

(2) Prayer and Wor- 
ship— V&t Prayer and 
Worship program, meets 
the basic needs of every 
age group through effec- 
tive prayer to increase an 
inner personal relation- 
ship with Christ and a 
period of Worship which 
will encourage and uplift 
every member. 

i3) Share Your Faith— 

Sharing your fiuth, is the 
reason First Baptist has 
experienced a substantial 
growth by telling others 
about Jesus Christ. The 
First Baptist Aunily is 
committed to an emphasis 
on evangelism and out- 
reach. In explaining the 
basic doctrine of the 
church Rev. Hemphil 
says, "public pri^ssioD 
of faith and believers 
baptism are prerequisites 
of membership. Each 
Christian has direct ac- 
cess to God through 
Christ. The ultimate 
source of authority in 
Jesus Christ the Lord, and 
every area of life is sub- 



ject to his Lordship. Ihe 
Bible is the inspired reve- 
lation of God's will and 
way. It is our authoritative 
rule oS faith and |»ac- 
tice. 

(4) Discover Your Gift 
and Use It— Discovering 
your gift and using it is an 
area that all Christians 
should seek "What can I 
do best and how can I do it 
to please God." 

Another ministry of 
Firat Baptist is in church 
training which enccHn- 
IMSses courses in Mble 
Study, "ACTS" Adult 
Christian Tndnlng Ses- 
sions, and two Youth 
classes. 

The music ministry pro- 
vides a (xmpktt graided 
choir program consisting 
of 9 (nine) dioirs (104 
enrolled in the adult choir, 
66 enrolled in the Youth 
choir and 142 enrolled 
in childrens choir). Spe- 
cial groups include Youth 
and Adult ensembles, 
various duets, trios and 
quartets; and organized 
HandbeU choin for chUd- 
ren, youth and adults, 
Firat Baptist started its 
own ordiestra this year 
with 12 regular memben 
performing at tlM present 
time. 

In February 1981, Dr. 
Kenneth S. Hemphil] be- 
came pastor of this 874- 
member church which 
was organized in 1803. 
Today's membership to- 
tals 2018. 



Indian River Baptist Church 

// / Should Die brings together some 
very respected Christian doctors, 
'^theologians and psychologists to in- 
vestigate this subject and how it relates to 
history's most consistent textbook on 
death and dying - THE BIBLE. 

The fitei will be shown March 27 at 
7:30p.m. :^ ,^ '. iw iy ; i $ a 



Church Of The Asccuioa 

On March 26 from 9 am. to 3: IS pm., a 
program, to help Girl Scout leaders and 
other interested adults understand critical 
problems impacting on today's child. 

The church is located Oh 4853 Princns 
Anne Road in Virginia Beach. 



LOOKING FOR: GOD 



Some say you find God just as well In a garden, tn 
the woods, or on a golf course asbia church — that 
God Is everywhere. But be honest about It, 

Are you not more apt to think of weeds, or 
mosquitoes, or a poor shot than you are of God? 
And aftvr aU, you have made this outing to seek 
pleasure. 

But what you go to church, it Is with the specific 
Mention of worshipping. Hmnyou engine in prayer, 
praiu and thanksgiving. Here you mingle with 
people who are seekUig God and have come to /ee/ 
His presence. In the quiet beauty of a sanctuary you 
fbwlfew outside distractions, and you 

tknow that this place Is dedkated to tht 
swkeofGod. 
For peace and happlnas which 
comes from really feding God's 
_ present, worsh^ In the house of 

the Lord this wmk — make It a 
ngutar prtKttet. 





Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Matthew 


Mark 


Luke 


11:1-19 


12:18-27 


7:11-17 



Wednesday 

John 

11:1-16 



Thursday 

John 
11:28-44 



New S«a^ Morale W«nM|i 1:31 BA 



912 



EvMtal Wonli^ 7 p.a. 

Ken Hemphill, Pastor 

■Ml, N«rf«lK, Va., 33Sn 4«1-M3» 



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Ttic 
^gOpcnDoor 

Chapel 



(904) $40-1441 



3177 Va. Beach Blvd., Va. Beach, Va.. 23452 



SUNDAY 

SaaiaySchetM 9:15 AM 

Wonk^Scfvlce I:MAM 

....M-JtAM 
PnteScrvkt <JtnM 



TUISDAV 

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PROVIDENCE ROAD - VIRCIIIIA aEACH. vmCMIIA V 

ii,i.'.,., li.c.!..., K.^w-, — J l»i«« X-J" *i-" 



Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 . 



CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

4925 Providenpe Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard Campbell, Pastor 

495-1004 
Youth L.I.F.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. 




CyiDIBMB^ 



SUNDAY 

lUtAJI. 



9m\ S. Ncwtomi I 
^NafMk.Va..23M2 



4<1^M1 



WEDNEaiAY 

iMn.y 



R. L. Kay, Ao/or ftmnyR.Thomas,-4sR>«Hfftaiof 



Kings Grunt Baptist Churcli 

873 Little Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



WNDAV 

H^On^l^^ ^vw^hI^P ■ ■ • w^^V aB^V< 

SmJi) Scfceal *m%.m. 

SwdwSckmrf wmmm. 

Mwak« Worak^ . . 11 M «.■. 
E«Hl«W«i4ip ...7Mp.H. 

Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
3^)-0902 



WfSNESDAY 
FmhI^ r«N|M DiMcr. AMp-a. 
Gn4eiCM*«a'i 

Owin «:3ep.M. 

Pi;v«r$(n^ fc4Sp.H. 




will&baumer' 



Candles 



Longs Religious 

Ste us for your amuMfcdto A*t.. mmm, Va. 
spnrial Easter Needs tt?.#4M 




MM WNniklWI DO IBilMnElfl 

IC00LMPtl4v«MW 

PIM0 W. MeSwdbty ir. H^or 
424-^700 



mtmimmammmmmmmmmmmmamm^Ktt^mmB 



16 Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, 1983 



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Guide To Virginia Beach 



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Schedule of Events 



p4ri6 &Crafi 



Women's Avx lo (he VBMS 
2nd Annual Craft Show 

Health Education Ctr. at 
Va. Beach General Hospital 



March 25 



Va. Beach Art Ctr. Art Festival March 24 - 20; 

J«^''"°? . 428^222 Info 

Youth Craft Day Every Tuesday. Ages 6-17 

Va. Beach Recreation Ctr. 463-0505 Info 



Yesterdays' 

■^ — ^ ^feasures 
T'odays' 

Wandicraft^ 
'^^^orrows' - 

heirlooms 







Carraway House 

317 S. Witchduck Road ., 



l/l delightful trip into the 
\pasl with I8lh century 
I reproduclions and ainiques. 
1 We carry someifiin$ for 
I everyone from Siieff 
I Pewier and Baldwin Brass 
10 beauii/ul Madison 
Square furniture. Also' 
country items like candia, 
folk art, primitive pain- 
lings, etc... gift Hems of a 
wide variety. Hours 10 til 5 
{ daily, I HI 5 Sun. Closed 
iWed. 












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jordan^s Country 

corner of S^^ 

mre. old fashioned Teddy 
"^.imkets shore inr^^i 











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/. Hoffman Galkries 
2. Corner Cottage 

(ilHIIIIifll 



i. 
4. 



Jordan 's Country Shop 
Countryside Shops 



5. The Lady Peddier 

6. hfmmUibi Cntfts 



7. 



Grandma's A ttk. Inc. 
Carraway HtMi$e 



WiilMHIIiliHIIMiiiii^ 



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I 
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Virginia Beac^ Sun, March 16, 1983 ^7 



Council In The Middle 



VOG Officers Explain Firing 



OHitiniMd tiom Page I 

"There would be no^istification for city councO 
to cut us off," Barr continued. "We plan oo 
serving the citizens d* Virginia Beach as mudi as 
ever-we'd just be doing it without Noona. But, 
the show must go oi." 

"We think we deserve that money and we are 
going to do everything we can to inake sure we 
iceep it," said Jerry Hayik, eicatfvt director of 
the VOG. "Tlie Virginia Pops and the Qty of Vir- 
ginia Beach have the VCX3's ftiU commitment. A 
loss of that kind o{ money would have severe 
effects oh the VOG, and I think that would be very 
un£ur." 

Added LoHls Ryn, the VOG's tMOthrc vice 
presMent: "Our commitment to Virginia Beach is 
unwavering. We're not going to atemdon the 
community. The VOG is here to serve the entire 
region. There is no reason for this to be turned 
into a Norfdk versus Virginia Beadi thing. We 
serve Virginia Beach, and that foct should not be 
lost upon city council, which seems commited to 
furthering hkxna's career." 



" Walter ^s intemperate comments in the 
press, coupled with his efforts to take 
away money from the VOG are the only 
reasons why he wm dismissed. If Walter 
hadn V gone to the press, and if he hadn 7 
gone to the Arts and Humanities Com- 
mission, we might have had a different 
scenario. Instead, we feel as though we 
have been betrayed'* - Louis Ryan, VOG 
executive vice president. 

^4oona's supporters claim, however, that the 
VOG is uncraicemed with Virginia Beach, and it 
was demonstrated by Noona's firing. 

One such supporter is Thomas A. liadsey, a 
40-year Virginia Beach resident, and the only 
member of the VOG to abstain in the 26-13 vote 
ousting Noona. "A lot of people at the Beach are 
disappointed by the VOG's firing of Noona, and 
they will show it by suppcMting a new orchestra 
under his direction at the Beach," he said. 

"Virginia Beach has been thrown out of the 
VOG," said Roebuck. "How can the VOG have 
p<^ concerts without Noona? Noona is 'Mr. 
Pq?s.' the VOG's attempt to reduce Mr. Noona's 
status within the organizaticxi was both a slap in 
his face and in the face of every Virginia Beach 
citian. The VOG made a gross errw, because a 
pc^s without Noona would be sadly lacking." 

Hictdnflkt *^- C ^^ 

The conflict came to blows two weeks igo wnen ' 
the VOG terminated Noona's services, replacing 
him with Virginia Phiharmonic Director Wchanl 
Waiiams. The pojM and the philharmonic are 
actuaUy one and the same, created in 1979 when 
the old Virginia Beach Pops under Noona merged 
with the old Nwfdk and Peninsula smyphonies. 
forming the VOG. The same musicians from the 
pops also perform in the philharmonic. Williams 
was previously the music director of the 
philharmonic, while Noona was music director of 
the pops. The Virginia Beach Conununity 
Orchestra, a group of amateur musicians umter 
the direction of conductor David Kunkel, also 
serves the region. 



VOG members had in recent months become 
dissatisfied with several aspects of Noaia's job 
performance, notably questions raised by nine 
first-chair pops musicians who criticized the 
maestro's conducting techniques. Also, critical 
reviews by staff writer Judith Greene in The 
ilrginian-nioi and Ledger-Star were used by the 
VOG to ascertain Noona's conducting compe- 
tence, according to a prepared statement. issued 
by Barr. 



*'We were aware of certain problems 
with Mr. Noona, so we came up with a 
new contract offer for him that would 
alUvUite those problems. We had been 
eyeing changes in our structure for quite a 
while, and we came to the realization that 
changes had' to be made. Mr. Noona 
rejected our offer'^ - Clay H. Barr, VOG 
president 

Jtioom was then offered a new contract, the 
terms of which included elimination of his title of 
music directs of the pops; reductirai from eight to 
five the number of subscription concerts for which 
Notma would be conducting next season; and an 
$ll,060 cut in salary. Noona. quoted in The 
Virginian'Pilot. called the offer "degrading, 
demeaning and entirely unacceptable." He said 
he would resign. 

But, on Feb. 26, Noona appeared before 
members of the Arts and Humanities Commission 
to propose the refwmation of his own orchestra in 
Virginia Beach. Roebuck went before City Council 
two days later and requested the withdrawal of 
city funding to the VOG, and suggested instead 
the money be used for a new Noona-led pops. 

Three days thereafter, Noona's $32,000 con- 
tract was disoxitinued. 

Why Noona Was fired 
According to Barr, No<Mia*s firing was based 
strictly upon musical caisiderations. "We were 
aware of certain pr(*lems with Mr. Noona, so we 
came up with a new contract offer for him that 
would alleviate those problems," she said. "We 
had been eyeing changes in our structure for quite 
a while, and we came to the realization that 
changes had to be made. Mr. Noona rejected our 
offer." 

Barr, who has been involved with the VOG 
(formerly the Norfolk Symphony) for 10 years, 
said the (Vganization, "cannot topple just because 
one man has left. Arthur Fiedler left the Boston 
Pops and.thcy are still flourishingi" V 
'" Bair'aSdecf that her decision wasl>ased neither 
on Greene's reviews nor on newspaper acc(xin^ 
of NocMia's arrest last November for allegctl 
shoplifting in a Farm Fresh store. Haynie and 
Ryan also dismissed any prejudices becguse of 
newspaper stories about Noona. 

Haynie said the VOG has had difficulties with 
Noona for quite some time. "We've had continual 
pr<^lems ever since the merger," he skid. "Our 
prdblem has been figuring out what part of his 
talent best fit in the organization. Once we figured 
it out, Walter flat refused to accept structure 
changes. 

"When it geu down to it, though, there are 
really two reasons why Walter Noona was fired," 



Havnie continued. "His going to the newsjapers 
complaining about the structure chaises, arid his 
efforts to divert public funds from the VOG while 
he was still employed here were viewed by the 
VOG as the major breakoff." 

Ryan echoed Haynie. "Walter'^ intemperate 
comments in the press, coupled with his efTmts to 
take away money from the VOG are the only 
reascms why he was dismissed," he said. "If 
Walter hadn't gone to the press, and if he Hadn't 
gone to the Arts and Humanities Commission, we 
might have had a different scenario, instead, we 
feel as though we have been betrayed. 

"People seem to think there has been some sort 
of sinister plot to sack Noona and undermine 
Virginia Beach," Ryan continued. "That's crazy. 
I'm from Richmond. Why would 1 want U» promote 
Norfolk any more than I would Vu-giiiia Beach?" 

Lindsey contends, however, that Ryan, who is 
the corporate secretary for Landmark Communi- 
cations, parent corpwation of The Virgiman-Pitot 
and The Ledger-Star, and the VOG would both 
benefit with the demise of Noona. 

"Landmark is responsible for Noona's firing," 
said Lindsey. "Why did Landmark want to get rid 
of him? Because Frank Batten (Landmark's 
Chairman of the Board) has a great deal invested 
in Norfolk, and anything that goes into N(M^foik is 
^better for Landmark and better for Batten." 
Lyndsey added that he feh Greene was ordered to 
write unfavorable reviews of Nocaia's ^Jdps 
performances. 

mm^mmamm^mmmmmammmmm 

*' Landmark is responsible for Noona's 
firing. Why did Landmark want to get rid 
of him? Because Frank Batten has'a great 
deal invested in Norfolk, and anything 
that goes into Norfolk is better for Lan- 
dmark and better for Batten...! can't say 
concolsuvely there was a conspiracy, but I 
will say things were organized very will 
against Noona" - Thomas Lindsey, 
VOG member 




Joaa (0 ■iKi Will daring bMMdktiwi. 



Center Is Named 
After Slain Hero 



\ 



Iwona, 



"I can't say conclusively there was a conspir- 
acy, but 1 will say things were organized very well 
against Noona," Lindsey said. "Then again, 
Norfolk is always organized well." 

Neither Batten nor Greene could be reached for 
cement. 

dubbed by RoebUCk, •ra reco^rtWd 

tourist attraction, along with the Boardwalk Art 
Sluw and the Neptune Festival," likewise could 
not be reached for comment. 

When the VOG was formed, Noona had oeen 
conducting both the Virginia Beach Pops and the 
Virginia Beach Sunday Pops since 1971. The two 
pops groups alternated Sunday perfcrmances at 
the Virginia Beach Civic Center. Noona disserved 
the amateur Sunday Pc^s in 1981^ citing his 
desire to work full-time with professional musi- 
cians. The Sunday Pops have been reformed as 
the Virginia Beach Community Orchestra under 
Kunkel. 



The City of Virginia 
Beach recently paid 
tribute to a slain police of- 
ficer by naming the police 
department's training 
facility in his honor. 

Approximately 100 
police officers and city 
dignitaries were on hand 
at the Virginia Beach 
Police Training Center on 
Leroy Drive, as Mayor 
Louis R. Jones unveiled a 
sign proclaiming the 
facility as the "Daniel T. 
Maloney Police Training 
Center." 

Maloney, who died 
December 27, 1981, was 
the first-ever Virginia 
Beach police officer killed 
in the line of duty. He was 
feloniously assaulted and 
killed by a man who had 
escaped from a Maryland 
correctional facility and 
who was being sought 



profession, he said. 

Police Chief Charles R. 
Wall said the training 
facility, through which 
every police officer passes 
at least once a year, is 
ideal for a memorial. 
"Every policeman who 
comes through here will 
remember Maloney and 
will be that much more 
careful," he said. 

The center, first opened 
in 1%7, is used primarily 
as a training grounds for 
firearms, according to 
Capt. E. F. Buzzy, an 
administrative aide to 
Wall. Through the years, 
Buzzy said, the center has 
doubled its firing capacity 
and has added moving 
targets, streetlight 
simulation, night training 
and a canine training 
range. 

,A11 Virginia Beach 



locally for questioning )n police .Officers are 
another criminal in- required to annuaUy un- 



"The first 40 years rfli^ give us the text; the ne^ 30 
supply the conuMntary on it." 

/ SchopenhaMer 



Agriculture Activities Are Scheduled 



USE THIS FORM 
TO SUBSCRIBE TO 

THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 
138 ROSEMONT ROAD 

Virginia Bcacli. Vs., 23452 

Call Robin at 5^-4571 

1SAME_ 

ADDRESS_. . 

CITY 

STATE, 

ZIP. 
PHONE. 



The Virginia Beach 
Department of Agricul- 
ture has announced the 
following acuvities: 

Saturday, March 19: 
creative and performing 
arts worksht^, 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m. at the Pavilioi the- 
atre. 



Maiday, March 21: 4-H 
monthly update meeting, 
7:30 p.m. at the 4-H 
office, Virginia Beach 
Municipal Center. 

Wednesday. March 23: 
Virginia Beach Civic 
Recognition Dinner, 
7 p,«i. at the Pavilion. 



I' 



WITHIN TIDEWATER AREA 

D Om year '9.0t 
nTw«¥Mn»15.ft 

Only 17C Am Imk! 
ALL OTHER AREA 

DOmYmt'ILM 
OTw\mnm.m 

PLEASE CHECK HERE if this is 
a new subscription. D ^ 
PLEASE CHECK HERE if you 
arc now rc<«iving THE VIRWNiA 
BEACH SUN and are renewing 
j your sutecripUonjD^ 




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Thursday, March 24: 
4-H sewing class, 7 to 9 
p.m. at the 4-H office. 

Monday, March 28: Vir- 
ginia Beach Association of 
Adult 4-H Volunteer 
Leaders, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
at the 4-H office. Virginia 
Beach 4-H teen leaders, 






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AU CUeWWJ AlWMil ■« -fW OCSWBMff POST AWO n« WrOiaA BiACH a« 

Fwr ti^ irttti your tfa^fted mi, pteate aiM S47-4571. 



7:30 to 9:30 p.m., 4-H 
office. 

Thursday, NIarch 31: 
4-H Achievement Record 
Workshop, 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m., 4-H office. ' 

Friday, April 1: 4-H 
livestock tour; deadline 
for honeybee essay 
entries and dbtrict horse 
program cover entries 
due. 

y^ril 7-11: Ocean Fun 
Horse Show. 

April 8: meeting for 
district contest work crew, 
7 p.m., 4-H office. 

April 9: district 4-H 
contest, all day, Princess 
Anne High School. 



vestigation. 

The brief ceremony, 
punctuated by constant 
drizzle, was also attended 
by Maloney's widow, 
Kathleen, and his parents, 
James and Dolores 
Maloney. 

Jones told the crowd 
that in his 2S years as a 
local funeral director he 
had come to know many 
Virginia Beach police of- 
ficers. In that time, the 
mayor said, he learn«i 
much about the dangers of 
being a police officer. 
Maloney's death, which 
Jones called "tragic," 
serves to remind the com- 
munity of the risks 
inherent in the police 



dergo firearms testing at 

the center. Federal agen- 
cies such as the FBI also 
us^ the facility, Buzzy 
said. 

Various groups and 
individuals have attem|M- 
ed for some time to per- 
suade city officials to 
name buildings after 
Maloney. In January, 
uniformed officers and 
members of a local frater- 
nal order of pdiceman 
asked the city's school 
board to name a new 
elementary school in 
Maloney's honor. The 
board voted insteKi to 
name the school, 
"Centerville Elemen- 
tary." 



Sciortino Sees Need For 
47 More Prosecutors 



Continued from Page I 

intolerable as I do and let 
the members of the Com- 
pensation Board and their 
state delegates and sen- 
ators know how they 
feel." 

The board, which funds 
two-thirds of Sciortino's 
budget, may allocate 
additional funds at any 
time. 



LIQUlffATION 
SALE 

COMPLETE 
INVENTORY MUST 
GO 

ALL MERCHANDISE 

AT LEAST 

50% OFF AND MORE 

Fashions By The Shore 

224S Seaskore Shoppes 
Virginia Beack, VA 23451 




The Qty <rf Virginia 
Beach pays the remaining 
third of the common- 
wealth's attorney's 
budget. Sciortino said the 
city has not dismissed the 
possibility of increasing 
its funding to the (rffice. 
But, Sciortino is also 
depending on iiu^reased 
funding from the state 
board. 

h) a Feb. 23 tetter to 
John M. Rasnick. Jr.. 
executive secretary. Com- 
monwealth of Virginia 
Compensation Board, 
Scirotino concludes the 
12-|»ge letter by suting. 
"The situation in Virginia 
Beach is critical. Whether 
it remains in a critical 
condition now depends in 
large measure on tlw 
Gxnpensation Board. 

The Virginia Beach 
commonwealth's attor- 
ney's office has 12 attor- 
nies, including Sckrtino. 
The number of active 
cases in aU Virgiiua Beadi 
caam, as at March 7, 
1983. is 1070. 

Sciortino would lil» to 
have 43 auomies by 1W5 
and 59 by 1995. 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



18 Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, 1983 



di 



Virsinia BeacK Public Notices 




"In Jail", left to right, were: Councilmen John 
Baum and Jack Jennings, who are joined by the 
city's Director of Data Processing, C. W. Smith. 



Photo by Joan Ashley 



; 20 Beachers 'Busted' 
; To Benefit Charity 

More than 20 Virginia Beach residents were 
"arrested" for MS recently at Lynnhaven Mall 
and raised more than $7,000 f(»- the Naticxial 
Multiple Sclerosis Society. Those confined could 
not be released until they have raised over $100 in 
"bail money." 

"Arrested," and how much they raised, were 

Virginia Beach residents : 

Virginia Beach City Councilman Harold 
Heischober, who raised the most money, 5800; 
Mary Sass, Commonwealth Health Care, $520; 
Paul Utterbach, Commonwealth Health Care, 
$500; Art Tharp, Investment Corporation of 
Virginia and Virginia Beach Association of 
Underwriters, $300; C. William Smith, director, 
Virginia Beach Data Processing Department, 
$263; Verlin Adams, Hc^land Elementary Scho<rf, 
$218.79; Cdr. Robert McFarland, Uttle Qeek 
Amphibious Base. $218; Nancy Creech, Virginia 
.B«u:h Qty Council, $195; Kim Smith, youth vs 
MS fa Bill Cqses, $161.50; Jim Casner, Systems 
"'CftgirtWrtflg n«ewi«tGhal:, $160; Mdly Cooper, 
Home Bewtficial Jthd Virginia Beach Association 
of Underwriters, $152; Chris Harliclter, Rices 
Nachman's, Lynnhaven Hall, $140; Mrs. Rc*ert 
McFarland, Womble Realty, $133; and Barbara 
Henley, Virginia Beach Qty Council, $115. 

Ihose raising $160 were: Hardd Mullins, 
Nfofluu- ireicGtive Services, bic; Cassie Meyer, 
Computer Related Services; Allen Fuentes, 
Computer Dynamics; John Baum, Virginia Beach 
Oty Council; Qcnn McQanan, Virginia Beach 
attorney and member of the Virginia House of 
Delegates; Paul A. SciOTtino, Virginia Beach 
Commwealth's Attorney; and H. Jack Jennings, 
Virginia Beach Gty Council. 

Raising $101 was Howard O^land, Virginia 




Photo by Joan Ashley 

After being "arrested" by Anthony 
ScarangeNa, Virginia Beach Commonwealth's At- 
torney Paul Sciortino is taken to "Jail." 

Beach attorney and member of the House of 
Delegates; Oral Lambert, director, Virginia Beach 
Public Works, raised $99.50; Norie Bastl, 
teachers vs. MS, raised $95; Richard Pippin, Jr., 
Life Federal Savings and Loan Association, 
$50.75. 



Beach Franchise Agreement 



I Continued from Page 8 , ^ 

i innovati(»is were already being done by the present 

( services with the exception of the patrd boat. "I'm n« 

( sure I'd put that much weight on the innovative part." 

! He said Council would have to be very careftil or the 

' franchise may be given to scsneone who may not be 

working for the ccmipany and may be just another 

' employee who may leave fcM" one reason or another. 

I Councilwoman Nancy Creech said she had the same 

[concerns. She said she did not want to take chances. 

She then suggeted holding interviews with the bidders. 

She said that Council might understand things better 

face to face. Gty Attorney Dale BimscHi said that the 

interviews would have to be held publicly. 

Creech said she did not dbycci to that. She said 
Council could ask questions directly instead of making 
\ interpretations. 

I Councilman Harold Heischober said he agreed and 
hated to put the safety of the tourists and the local 
. people who use the beach in jeopardy. 

He said there is no substitute for experience and is 
c(xicerned tht the bid did not lock in the cost of rental. 
"Absentee ownership trcxibles me a whole lot," he 
added. The present c^ratws are right there on the job, 
he said. Kuehn, the perscm delegated to be on thejob 
fOT the Beach Patrd, could be dismissed at any time, he 
J said. 

1 Kuehn has ten years experience with the Virginia 

L Beach Patrd, for the past five years as head supervisor 

for the Ncwth Beach Services operated by Kitchin. He 

has a B.S. degree in recreational management from 

VPI-SU. 

Other officers of Beach PatrcJ, who also are 
stockhdders, are James W. Hall, secreatary, R.R. 
McChesBcy, treasurer and E.S. Garcia, assistant 
secretary, all of Virginia Beach, 

Heischc^r said he could make a decision Mcmday 

but that it wcwld mx be in agreement with the staffs. 

Councihnan Dr. J. Henry McCc^ Jr. ccmmended the 

staffs analysis but "that doesn't mean I'll go along 

with it." 

Ccwncilwcxnan Reba McQanan said she was surpris- 
ed at the bid docuBwnts themselves. She said she 
understood how tte staff arrived at its decisicm, but 



said, "No one awards a contract on the basis ot 
brochure." She said that further discussioi was 
essential. "Sometimes people who have been providing 
services take them for granted," she said, and 
suggested that was what the present (^ratOTS may 
have done.d 

Councilman Jack Jennings said that Virginia Beach 
Patrol made an excellent proposal. H^ said he hated to 
give the impression that the "new giys on the block" 
are not being given consideratirti. "I want them to 
persevere, give everygody a fair shake." 

"All we want it to talk to everytme," Creech said. 

Vice Mayor Barbara Henley said that everyone fills 
out a form in a different way. She asked for a report <m 
services which have been offered by the present 
operators. 

R. Jones s{iid he had misgivings about the whole 
thing and questioned Council's legal position. 

Bimson said he would talk to Council about that in 
the executive session. 

Heischober also wanted to know whether the 
franchises could be asked to restrict increased in rental 
fees over the five-year period, while Mayo- Jaones was 
interested in knowing who the stockholders are. 

Officers of Ocean Rescue are R.L Kent Hinnant, 
president; lorraine L Hihhant, secretary/treasurer, 
who also serve on the board of directors with Graham 
K. Hinnant. Holding 100 percent of the stock are 
Graham and R.L. Hinnant. 

Kitchin who has 50 years experience renting beach 
equipment and providing lifeguard service, is the sde 
owner and stockhdder of his canpany. 

/^ong the innovatirais offered by Beach patrol are a 
boat patrol, telephOTes at the lifeguard stands 
connected to a central cc»nmunications center, pwtable 
radios for the patrol captain, franchise manager and all 
supervisOTs. Completion by all lifeguards of a 1,000 
yard run-swim run-swim-run test, training in the surf 
rescue schod (grated by the patrd, preparation of an 
c^ratiois and training manual, daily drill of life- 
guards, a full-time beach patrol captain, a four-wheel 
drive jeep and firsi-aid-equipped bicycles, and other 
offerings. 

Councilman W H. Kitchin III, son of one of the 
bidders did not participate in the discussion. 



Superior Court For 
The State of Abiska 
Third Judicial District 
In the Matter of the Adop- 
tion of Robbi Jo Bertrand 
and Robert Wayne Ber- 
trand, minors. 
CaseNo.3AN-83-72P/A 
To: Robert Wayne Ber- 
trand 



NOTICE OF ABSENT 
DEFENDANT 

You, the natural fatho- 
of the above minor 
children, are hereby 
notified that a Petition has 
been filed in the above 
Court for the adoption of 
the above named minor 
children and that the 
hearing upon said Petition 
is set for the 23 rd day of 
May, 1983, at the hour of 
2:30 p.m., in Room 237 of 
the above Superior Court, 
303 K Street, Anchorage, 
Alaska. Grounds for 
dispensing with your con- 
sent to this adoption are 
that you have failed to 
communicate meaning- 
fully with the child and to 
provide for the child's 
support for more than one 
year without justifiable 
cause. Any objections to 
the granting of the 
Petition must be presented 
at the time and place set 
for hearing and failure to 
do so may result in the en- 
try of a Decree of Adop- 
tion forever terminating 
your parental rights with 
respect to said minors. 



Dated this 8 day of 
March, 1983. 
Mary F. LaFollette 
Attorney for Petitioner 
191-2 3T 3/30 VB 



Public Notice 
Notice is hereby given 
that on February 23, 1983, 
rVirghiia Beach Television, 
(Inc. riJed » ap^ication 
with <he Federal Com- 
munications Commission 
for construction permit 
for a new UHF Television 
Broadcast Station on 
Channel 43. 644-650 
MHz, at Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. This station 
would operate with 
maximum effective 
radiated power of 331.9 
kilowatts visual, 33.2 
aural, and tise an antenna 
with height of 518 feet 
above average terrain. The 
transmitter would be 
locaated 0.7 miles southeast 
of the junction of Princess 
Anne and Indian River 
Roads, Pungo borough, 



city of Virginia Beach. 
Tlie main studio w(wld be 
located within Virginia 
Beach at a site to be 
determin»l. The officers, 
directors and 10 percoit <» 
greater stockholders of 
Virginia B«ich Tekvision, 
Inc. are as follows: Har- 
vey m. Budd, Mark Kane 
Goldstein, Thomas G. 
Sonsini, Dennis J. Kelly 
and American Satellite 
and Television. Inc. 

A copy of this ap- 
plication, together with all 
amendments and related 
materials, is available for 
public inspection week- 
days during regular 
business hours at the 
Virginia Beach Public 
Library, 936 Indepen- 
dence Boulevard. Virginia 
Beach. Virginia. 
189-11 3T 3/23 VB 

Public Notice 
Notice is hereby givm 
that on February 22, 
1983 an application was 
filed with the Federal 
Communications Com- 
mission in Washington, 
D.C. by Tklewater Broad- 
casthig Company, Inc. for 
authority to construct a 
new commercial television 
station on UHF Channel 
43-i-, in Virginia Beach. 
Virginia, with the 
following technical 
facilities: Channel 43 -t-. 
644-650 Mhz; 5.000 kW 
visual and 500 kW aural 
effective radiated power. 
The proposed transmitter 
site is 2.2 miles West of 
the Intersection of Route 
17 and Route 64 with 
geographic coordinates 
North Utitude 36* 45' 
23" and West Longitude 
76' 23* 06". Height above 
average terrain of 522.9 
feet, with nondirectional 
antenna. Studio location: 
a site within the Virginia 
Beach city limits to be 
determined at a later date. 
The officer, director 
and so)f shareholder of 
Tidewater Broadcasting 
Company, Inc. is 
Celestine L. Willis. 

A copy of this ap- 
plication is available for 
public inspection during 
regular business hours at 
the following address: 
6636 Chartwell Drive, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
23464. 
189-3T3/23VB 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

On Feb. 23, 1983, 
Atlantic Telecasting Ltd. 
partnership filed with the 
Federal Communications 
Commission in Washing- 
ton, D.C. an application 



for authorizadon to con- 
struct a new UHF 
television station to 
operate on Channel 43 in 
Virginia B^urh, VA with 
affective radiatnl tower of 
5000 kilowatts maxium* 
visual and 500 kilowatts 
maximum aural. The 
proposed antenna site will 
be approximately 1.0 
miles north of city limits 
of Moyock, North 
Carolina (North latitude 
36*, 32 minutes, 57 secon- 
ds; West longitude 76*, 1 1 
minutes. 21 seconds). The 
main studio will be 



located on a site to be 
determined in Virginia 
Beach. The general par- 
tners of the applicant are 
Mrs. Carletta Marie Lloyd 
and Mr. Larry L. Harris. 
The limited partner of the 
applicant is Mrs. Marilyn 
Goldman. Copies of the 
application, amendments 
and related materials are 
on file for public inspec- 
tion at Virginia Beach 
Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va. Mon- 
day through Friday during 
normal business hours. 
189-4 3T 3/16 VB 



Bayside Victorious 

In Beach District 
Forensics Meet 



Bayside High School forensics team members and 
captured first place in six of nine events of the Beadi 
DMtrict Forensics Meet held recently at Princess ^ine 
High School, hi addition, Bayside team member won a 
second place and a third in two other events. 

The Bayside team scored a total ai 34 points; 
KemptviUe lOgb Sclunl was second with 14 points and 
one first ptacc; Princeis Anne was third, with 13 points 
and a first pla^ in the remaining two eveitts. Bayside 
captured the district champicnship for the third 
consecutive year and was to compete in the Eastern 

^SSay^M^cht'' " '''^ ^''' "^'^ ^*»«- » 

team, to her 12 yean as coach, Bayside has woo eight 
dutrict championships and four regional champion- 
ships. Fifteen of her students have also been state 
winners m past years. 

The Bayside first place winners in the Beach I&tria 
this year were: Scott Baradell, boys' extemporaneous 
spealdng; Jewell Lim. girls' extempcraneous speaking; 
David Arnold, boys' original oratory; Kathynin Brock, 
girls' original oratory; Charlotte Eike. girls' poetry 
reading; and Lara Williams, spelling. Gharkstte Eike is 
the only member of the team who was also a team 
number last year, when she {Placed first in the regional 
meet and third in the state meet. 

PriAcess Mne wiimers were Bryan Harrell and 
Gretchen Sellers, who lock first {rfaoe in bo^' prose 
rewling and girls' prose reading, respectively. Scott 
dvk (tf Kempsville Ifigh claimed first place in the 
boys' poetry reading event. 

The forensics events, under the sponsorship of the 
Vtfgiina Hgh ScIkx4 League, are the only competitive 
acwtemic events in whidi schools throughout the state 
pdrticqMte. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regutar meeting of the Gty Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the Gty 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Vu-ginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, March 
28, 1983, at 7:00 p.m. at which time the fdlowing 
applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon implication of Nelson P. Tibbitt, 
Jr., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFI- 
CATION from R-6 Residential District to A-2 Apart- 
ment District on certun property located at the 
Southeast comer of P*mbr<*e Boulevard and Witch- 
duck Road, running a distance of 715 feet al(xig the 
East side of Witchduck Road, running a distance of 100 
fieet in a Southeasterly direction, nmning a distance of 
262.08 feet in a Northeasterly direction, running a 
distance of 169.8 feet in an Easterly direction, running 
a distance of 237.5 feet in a Ncntheasterly directicm, 
running a distance of 40.12 feet in an Easterly 
direction, running a distance of 138 feet in a 
Northeasterly direction, runnmg a distance of 101.70 
feet in a Westerly directioi, running aidstance of 44 
feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 
39 feet in a Northeasterly direction, running a distance 
of 65.90 feet in a Northwesterly direction, running 
adistance of 84.80 feet in a Northeasterly direction and 
running a distance of 256.94 feet in a Northwesterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 7 acres mort or less. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

VIROIMA BEACH BOROUGH: 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Runnington 
Uivestment Corp., for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CIASSIFICATION firom I-l light tadustrial 
District to B-4 Resort Conunercial restrict on the South 
side of Pinewood Drive, 100 feet West of Mediter- 
ranean Avenue. Said parcel is located on Lots 17 and 
18, Block 8, Pinewood, and contains 6381 square feet. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 
C0ra)rnC»4AL USE PERMITS: 

V1RGINL\ BEACH BOROUGH: 

3. >^ Ordinance upon Application oi Sea Pines 
Associates for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
temporary parking lot oi certain property located at the 
Southwest corner of Atlantic Avenue and 34th Street, 
running a distance of 210 feet altmg the West side of 
Atlantic Avenue, running a distance of 130 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 90 feet in a 
Southerly direction, running a distance of 100 feet 
along the North side 33rd Street, running a distance of 
300 feet along the East side of Pacific Avenue and 
running a distance of 230 feet along the South side of 
34th Street. Said parcel contains 1.31 acres. VIRGINL\ 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

BAYSmE BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Jdm C. Aspinwall 
for a CONDWONAL USE PERMIT for mini-ware- 
houses ion certain property located on the Soith side of 
Shore Drive begiiming at a point 600 feet more ca less 
West of Independence Boulevard, running a distance of 
160.24 feet along the South side of Shore Drive, 
running a distandc ot 531.65 feet along the Western 
property line, running a distance of 40 feet in a 
Southwesterly direction, running a distant^ of 25 feet in 
a Southeasteriy directioA running a distance of 410 feet 
in a Northeasterly direoion, running a distance of 415 
feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 
280.06 fieet in a Northerly direction, running a distance 
of 137.09 feet in a Westerly directirai, running a 
distance of 1 17.34 ieetin a Soitherly direction, runnmg 
a distant of 355 feet in a Westerly direction and 
running a distance of 260 feet in a Northerly direction. 
Said parcel contains 4.4 aaes. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
PUNGO BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of John H. and 
Thomas F. Gray for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for 2 single fibnily homes in the AG-1 Agricultural 
District on lots located on the East side of Knotts Island 
Road banning at a pcnnt 311.06 feet North of the 
Virginia-North Caroliiui State line, running a distance 
of 15.64 feet along the East side of Knotts Island R(»d, 
running a distance of 451.69 fMt in an Easterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 472.94 feet in a Northerly 
direction, running a dUtance of 570.64 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 15.62 feet 
along the East side of Knotts Island Road, running a 
(Ustance of 1388.40 feet along the Northern property 
line, running a distance of 5^.82 feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a distance of 1281.70 feet 
along the Southern property line. Said parcels contains 
13.5 acres. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
PUNGO BCHUXKjH: 

6. ^peal fitjm Decisions of Administrative CMIicers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdiviiiai Ordi- 
nance, Subdivision for John H. and Thomas F. Oay. 
Said property is located on the East side of Knotts 
bland Road. 311.06 fieet North of the Virginia-North 
drolina &ate Use. Plats with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in tht Department (^ Hanning 
PUNGO B0R0UC». 

Plats with more detailed information are available in 

the Department of Planning. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth (fodges Smith 

Gty Gerk 

187-10 2T3/16VB 



mmgmmmmm 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, 1983 19 



Classified Ads 









4Mm 




10.Nfl^WMM 




n.FmHm 




24.MfaiittdT«liiy 




3t.lMiIrtite 




^U^ 





tVHK CARS AND TRUCKS 

Towed free. Some bought. Call 
485-1961 or 485-5859. 
ITFii 

FREE ■ PREPARATORY cour- 
se for Real Eitate License 
examination. For details call 
Russell Harrison 420-31% or 
nighti 547-5500. HIGGINGS 
REALTY INC. 

— . l-M-*/6 

CREDIT PROBLEMS? - 
Receive a Mastercard or Visa, 
Guaranteed, No body refused; 
for free Brochure send Sdf Ad- 
dressed Stamped envelope to 
CREDIT DATA. P.O. Box 
271084, Dallas Texas 75227 or 
call ANYTIME 214;324-5944. 

l-4t-4/6 



EXnSIMENTAL PMX»AM 

FREE 

UPHOLSTERY CLEANING 

With paid ai^lication of scotch- 
fwtfd. AppHcatioa per fttrmtnie 
piece, SIO.OO, first 100 callers 
only. Spectrum Upholstery 
Oeamrs, 422-4489. 

1 IT 3-16 

gSEDIT PROBLfJMS? Receive 
a Mastercard or Visa, Guaran- 
teed. Nobody refused; for free 
^ochure soul Self Addressed 
Stamped envelope to CREDIT 
DATA, P.O. Box 271084, Dallas 
Texas 75227 or call ANYTIME 
214-324-5944. 

l-«-4/6 



Any Pwpoie Real Estate LoaM 

Viil^iila-North Carolu 
WITH GOOD CREDIT UP TO 

100<7o Of Value 

Reflaancc Mortwcs 

1st, 2Bd, or 3nlfl 

fai loiiie case* iatefctt at low as 

12% 

BADqtEDIT 

with safflciciity cqnity 

Guaranteed 
Approval 

stop Foreclosures 
Pay Judgements Or 

IRS 

Abo VA A FHA Rcflnandag 

Open Till 8 PM 

S«I.10TIU2PM. 

Capital Astodala 

499-1854 4884288 

After Honrs 486-4285 



INCX)ME TAX • and Account- 
ing (including tax audiu). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Call 463-6608. 

ITFN 




CREDIT PROBLEM? 

Receive a Mastercard or Visa, 
Guaranteed, nobody refused; for 
free Brochure send Self Ad- 
dressed Stamped Envel<^ to 
Credit Data, Box 271084, DaUas 
Texas 75227 or Call Anytime 
214-324-5944. 
1 4T4/6 

NEED CREDIT HELP? - 

Receive a Mastercard or Visa, 
Guaranteed, Nobody refused; 
for free brochure send S.A.S.E. 
to House of Credit, Box 280570. 
Dallas, Texas 75228 or call 
Anytime 1-214-324-5944. 
24T3/I6 

DIET AND HEALTH SEEKERS 

Safest most effective diet and 
nutrition plan now available. 
AMA and pDA approval. In- 
dividual or group program 
guaranteed to build health. Call 
421-3116. 
24T3/30 

LAOIE Wrrn a jeep ■ would 
like to meet-a man with boat. 
Object is outdoor recreation. 
Reply to P. O. Box 1282, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 . 

— r^ iMM 

RECEIVE A MASTERCARD 
OR Visa. Guaranteed, nobody 
refused; for free brochure fall 
House of Credit, toll free 1-8C0- 
442-1531 anytime. 

ttFS 



If you want to Df) I P^^ 
that's your busines^l, 




If you waht to STOP 
Call:499-8865 

Private/Confidential 

(phone if someone close 
needs het(> ) 



3.LMtftrMNd 



HlXSV -»Mk<iaVfakftr^wk8)Md 
n-ipitmnei:. i Ofeatt »a#|<iai«iitai 
v^hie. Lost Great Bridge top- 
ping Center area. Reward. Call 
421-2866. 

3 4T3/I6 



4.AiitM 



dSS 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Homes <fi Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 
333 Providence Rd. 



CALL 464-9317 



1974 GRAN TORINO - Dark 
Green. Good student transpor- 
tation, just inspected. Runs very 
good. $895.00. 421-9279 or 421- 
9060. 
44T3-30 

TOYOTA - Corolta, 1975, new 
inspection, new tires, in good 
mechanical condititm, does not 
burn oil, good milMge, body in 
very good condition. $1595 
negotiable. Call 583-9343. 

44T3-23 



High Quality Ai Lou Price 

BABY 
BAZAAR 

Baby i'urniiurc by Ba>scii 
Nursery AcccitMirirs , 

iiixxial tiifi* Iw Spwial Hahio ' 






IRU JAV AWAV 



467-5032 

ISM LymHnven Pliw). 

iri iintm Rur 

M-» W4 Mai W-S 



^>^ii^ii^>^ii4y»i^n^i^>^( 



MAZDA • IfT), dw, awlor BO 
good. Rx2 four door. SlOO or 
best offer. CaU420:-O468. 

4-H-?/» 

PARTS - 1968 Skylark Buick, 
excellent engine and tran- 
smission. S75 lakes the whole 
car. Call Wednesday thru Sun- 
day ar 427-1901. 

4TFN 



1979 HONDA • 185 Tmn Star, 
black, electric kick start, dual 
extaust. Was $795 only $595. 
CaU anytiflM home 427-1477, 
work 463-5040. 

7TFN 



i0.ii«^ilrMtid 



TELEPHONE SALES - Mor- 
ning hours, salary and bonuses. 
No experience necessary. We , 
train. Great for studenU and 
housewives. Call 627-1999. 

lOTFN 

OWNBR-OPERATORS 
ICC Country Wide General 
Commodity Specialized Carrier. 
Long or short runs • vans, flats 
or rotfers, with or without 
trailers)) 2 years over road ex- 
perienG*,. 25 years minimum age, 
73 or later tractor, terminal ad- 
.vances and payoffs. Immediate 
openings, call (804) 798-9097 Mr. 
Bowman. 

102T316 
SINCERE BOOK SALES - 
Agents wanted now, part time or 
full, do not confuse wi|h usual 
worn-out offer. No experience 
needed. For details send $1 to 
Beech Sales, 44]2-B, 
Schoolhouse Path, Portsmouth, 
V A 23703. 

I04T3I6 

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER 
General Superintendent. 
Medium sized and growing 
commercial/industrial contrac- 
tor seeking mature self starting 
indivldud with indepth construc- 
tion knowledge and hands on ex- 
perience, must be capable of 
communicating with properly 
motivating job superintendent as 
well as communicating with 
owner/customers. Send com- 
plete resjime to:,L. White Co., 
IHc, -^ kUifigifli Rd.. Fretf- 
ricks. VA 22401. M\ replies held 
confidential upon request. 

10 5T 3/30 

PROCESS MAIL AT HOME - 
$30.00 per hundred! No ex- 
perience. Part or full time. Start 
-imiliediately. Detalb, send self- 
addnssed, stamped envelope. 
Haiku Distributors, 113 
Watpalani Rd., Haiku, HI 
96708. 
lO-TFN 

CLERK - Afcounts Receivable 
H.S. Grad.,'good with flgures 
company betiefits. CaU for ap- 
pointment.' Ms. Edwards, 627- 
8634. 
_^____^ 10IT3I6 

NEW OPENINGS - For nation- 
wide industry, no sales, will 
train, $15,000 plus a year. For 
informaUon caU 1 -3 1 2-93 1 -705 1 . 
' 104T4-6 






HOME 
IMPROVEMENT 

Room additions for ail 
purposes. Convert 
garage, nrisc dormers. 

Any type of improv- 
ment. Bathroom and 
Kitchen remodeling. 

R.H. BLACK 

399-1359 397-7171 



KST PART -mm JOB IN 

TOWN. Need two amMlious 
women to anit in fast growing 
business. $150 per week. 10 hrs a 
week. For interview appointment 
call 422-0076 or 467-2678. 

10 IT 3/16 



* 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



20 words or less • $4.40. Additional words • 22^ each. 
Please print clearly using one word per box. 









































4.40 


462 


4.84 


5.06 


SJS 


5.50 


5.Z2 


5.94 


• 16 


«.» 


6.60 



Please run ad for 

Mail to: 

Byerty Publications 
P.O. BOX 1527 
Chesapeake, va. 23320 



is^es. or until cancelled ( ). 



Cost of single ad $ 

Number times to run 
Amount enclosed $ _ 



Name 

Address 
CltY_ 



_state_ 



^P- 



Your telephone number 



L 



AU OA^MED AOS RUN m THE OttSAPEAKE POST AW T^ V«KW«A KACM SM. 

For help With your cl»«flefl ad, pfc 1547-4571. 



J 



11. Pmhmm Wanlan 



G^ERAL HOUSE Oeaning 
reliable and experienced. Call 
340-1389. HTFN 



12. ill— w O p p w l— l ty 



nNEST ONE MAN Business 
for the out going person, retfdy 
to start now earning big dollars 
in a business of your o*.n. Qdl 
Mr. Hall I 919-633-0372. 
12 IT 3-1 

UNKUEVABLE Opportunity 
- With Franklin Marketing 
Company. Extra income, no 
risk, minimum monthly invest- 
ment for super returns. Call 
Wayne at 547-2059. 
12 4T 3-16 



tlMs 



GOLDEN RfTTiUaVER ' For 

Stud, AKC registered, dark 

golden, 2Vi year old, chanfton 

bloodline. Choice of fee or pick 

of Utter. Call after 5, 804-653- 

2051. 

lilEN 

STOP LIVING IN FEAR- 

Complete Dog Training 3 mon- 
ths to 3 years. Licensed ft'bm 
largnt K-9 Corp. in the nation., 
Call 481-6999. 
lilEN 

SIAMESE KITTENS - Red 

Point, registered; champioa 
nred, show quality, $200. 481- 
3358 

13TFN 



GERMAN SHEPARD Pup- 
pies - AKC regittncd, for pet 
or show. $130 and up. 
COUNTRY JSQUIRE 
SHEPARDS, Call48H085< 
JJ-T^N 



rjrv 



iBi 



"11311 

'Ji 



MSHWASHES • Ncc(b gasket. 
$25. CaU 420-7719. 

13 TI?,' 



lS.ArtieiMF«rfali 




Mnm. M tk iM. iwn im 

mmem mm wul mm IriuHt 
Mm Mm uu nwttaiCM: 

litlMiMati:*) 



mI imTiiliumm K «> 



SOTA AND CHAim • brown 
and tan plaid, 3 cushion, sofa, 2 
olive greoi velveteen barrel back 
chain, $75 each. Black vinyl bar, 
$50. 2 bean bag chain, white and 
yeUow $5. Call 420-7719. 
17TFN 

3 PIECE SOUD TEAKWOOO 

Stereo Cabinet - 85" long, lou of 
storage space for tapas and 
records. Has Sony reeWo-reel 
tape deck and Sony receiver 
SR6050, 30 watts per channel. 2 
Sansui speakers, SP2000. Space 
in cabinet for turntable. All for 
$800. Call 588-5811. 

I7TFN 



SWIMMING POOL SUDE - 

$250, Galviniznl Big T Gym set, 
$20. 3 by 5 black slate black 
board, $15. Call 420-7719. 
I6TFN 

METAL PYRAMID SHELVING - 

18 foot long, 4 feet wide. Some 
shelves missing.^ $25. Call 4W>- 
31 13 weekdays. 9-5. 

16 4T 3-30 



Iva AMn^lMS 



Zl 



ANTIQUE KITCHEN 

Wood/coal stove. Good con- 
dition. Call days at 547-4571 af- 
ter 6 caU 485-4684. 
^ I8TFN 

IVORY COLLECTION • 

Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
Krecns, silks. Cloisonne neck- 
laces; Vases and Boxes. 1804 
Granby St., 625-9119. Daily 10- 
5. 

.. I8TFN 



It-McyelM 



GIRLS BIKES - 20 inch, $13. 10 
speed $35, i speed $25. Call 420- 
7719. 

19 TFN 



21.T«itvisl«i/$terM 



REALISTIC RECEIVER ■ STA 

225, 65 watts per channel. Ex- 
cellent' condition. $225. Call 547- 
4571 ask for Mike or after S:00 
caU 420-6953. 
?1TFN 

SEARS STEREO - AM/FM. 8 

track, turn table. $50. CaU 420- 
7719. 

2I4TTFN 



^ 



22.hmky 



flES JEWELRY FOR SALE 
ladks cocktatf tiag with 41 
Dnds and is 14 carat yellow 
laoU. Also a 14 carat white gold 
^ jewel ladies Biilova watch. 
Rftif anvalsed at $3400 and 
wauh appraised at $1900. WiU 
sell either for half the appraised 
value. Call 547-0858 after 5:00 



p.m. 



22 TFN 



14 KT GOLD HEART - With 
Diamond pendent, purchased at 
Fine Jewlery Store. Never worn. 
Call 623-4040. 

22 4T 3-19 



24.WMiMToliiy 



TABLE SAW • Prefer carbide 
blade. Will pay cash. Call 627- 
5020 8 - 5 p.m. Ask for Lisa. 

yUNK CABS Wrecked or run- 
ning, cash-free towing. We also 
buy used radiaton and battericf . 
7 days a week. CaU 487-9222 or 
after 6^.m. 340-1059. 

24TFN 



WANfID 

TO IMY 

SCMP 

comR 



t 

CALL 
Joe M. Dedfier 
Cai^Mny, Inc. 

622-19S0 



iHaL. 



When Something Needs 
Building or Repaired, You Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 

Home Improvemeni 
Spcciuii.sl.s 
>UiiiliiiiigC'oiilr:icitir«R(x>ls|L'arpiirtN*CiaiaKc:« 
•Ball) Kcfii(>dcled*Room Additions 
•Aluminum Sidinp»Kilchen Remodeling 

545-7318 

llnKhK.Bterk.Sr. 





Commo-cial & R^idential 

D^ign - Build 

Dean P. Edwards, Inc. 

Room i^ktiti<Mf 

Oan$ia 

Decks 

Ctesapeake 

804^21-9273 



Remo<kUng 

New Hmi» ConsnictioM 
919-261-2901 



CASH PAID - Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire housefulls. Also, good 
used furniture. Call 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24 TFN 



2S.fiM4TMi«sT«Eat 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS • 

Across from Hurd Seafood 
Restaurant. Shucked in own 
natural jucies. By quarts, pints, 
or busheU. Call 340-5171. 

25-TFN 



HOME RLNTALS - Urgently 
needed in the Tidewater area. Let 
us handle your property for per- 
sonal attention. Call Ellen at 

,481-3177 or 481-0612. Lelour- 
neou Realty. 

364Ii:21. 

FOR SALE - By owner. Large 
Brick Colonial Rancher on 63 
acres, 35 miles ^th of Peter- 
sburg, near 1-85. Reduced sub- 
stantially to $120,000. Brochures 
available. P.O. Box 56, Alberta, 
VA 23821. 

• 36-2t-3/16 






D 



FOR SALE-70 Ballroom dance 
lessons. Call Larry Dunn for 
more information 480-2154. 
26-TFN 



n.LnmftfiardM 



LANDSCAPING SERVICE ■ 

Lawn and Garcten restoration, 
grading and seeding. Free 
estimates. 421-7350. 
28 TFN 

Cofflncfclal • Rciidcnlial 
Laadscaping Services 
TORO Sprinkler Systems In- 
stalled. North Landing Nursery 
(Next to Farmers Market), 
Virginia Beach. 427-6886 
i2IEN 

JOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and lawn ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-4949. 
29TI 

IT'S SPRING Planting time! 
Free copy 48 page Planting 
Guide-Catalog in color, offering 
one of the most complete lines of 
fruit trees, nut trees, berry plan- 
u, grape vines, landscaping plant 
material. Waynesboro Nurseries 
Inc., Waynesboro VA 22980. 
29 4T 3-30 

MULCH-BUTLER AND SOI. 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
woodj trackload, any tize. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
while on sale. We deliver in one 
day. 853-0250 or 855-7467. 

29 TFN 



32.lwiiiMtFwtMrt 



STORES AND STORAGE areas 
- AU sizes. Properties unlimited. 
Marvin Goldfarb. 399-8390, 484- 
1275. 

32 TFN 



33. A^MlRMirtt Far iMit 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, Apartmenu for adulu. I 
and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
2 bedroom townhouses. We pay 
heat and hot water. The Pines. 
Call 468-2000. 

33-TFN 

APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
locations, one and 2 bedroom 
apartments. From $260. Rental 
ofnce, 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

33 TFN 



35.NMnMFM'llMrt 



WILSON HEIGHTS 

Chesapeake, One year old 3 
bedrocmi Cape Code, IVi bath, 
great room with a fire place, 
large country kitchoi, formal 
dining room, garage. $575 a 
month. Call 547-4555. 

35 IT 3/16 



RiFiUIIS 
— sffaAL LM turn 



PUNIMIie-aECTIUCAl 

CN^nTRY ■ PANTaiG 

Pool Service and Supplies 

Butm Eninpristi I3ayt/E«c>: 
340-8981 



37.Ut«FBrM« 



CDMETERY LOTS - ^oodlawn 
Memorial Gardens, 2 lou in St. 
Lukes section. Paid $800 wiU sail 
for $700. Call 583-9343. 



3S. Mtbit Nbmbs 



HOLIDAY - 1975, excellent 
condition, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 
and appliances, new vinyl skir- 
ting, plus many exras. Moving 
must sell. Home must be moved. 
$9,400 or best offer. Call 468- 
0770. If no answer call 427-2176. 
38 TFN 



INCOME TAX - and Account- 
ing (including tax audiu). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd., (near 
Rosemont Rd.) CaU 463-6608. 
^ 39-TFN 



BOOKKEEPING • Monthly 
balance-sheet, P & L detailed 
trial balance from your checks 
and receipU, stubs, or resiater 
Upes. 941 's and VA-S's. Up to 
200 checkbook transactions 
monthly; $45. Payables, receiv- 
able, small payroU. Chesapeake 
only. CaU 420^23. 

39-TFN 

BOOKKEEPING SERVICE • 

Including quarterly payroll 
reports and bank account recon- 
ciliation. Specializing in tmaU 
proprietorships. Pick up and 
delivery. Retired profeiiional. 
Call 420-5624. 

39 TFN 



40. Services 



PRESTON PEST CONTROL 

Today Special Only. Treat for 
mice and rau March 24. CaU 
before 12 o'clock most places. 
$10,543-1898. 

<0 IT 3/16 

EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM 

FRE£ 
UPHOLSTERY CLEANING 
With paid api^cation of scotch- 
guard. Application per furniture 
piece. $10.00, Tint 100 caUen 
only. Spectrum Upholstery 
Cleaners. 422-4489. 
«>\T i\^ 

TAX RETURNS 

Dave Huff 

Accountant 

Call 481-2687 

Bookkeeping and Tax Planning 

49-4T . LJi 

BOOKKEEPER • Will do books 
in my home. Experienced in 
payroll and quarterly returns. 
Pick-up and delivery service. 
CaU 545-4096 after 5 p.m. for 
more information and rates. 

40HTFN 



TXPING SERVICE - For 

businesses and individuals. 7 
days a week, IBM Sclectric. 
Reasonabte rates. Call atber 
467-7112, KeropsvUk area, or 
463-0236, Hilltop/Pembroke 
area. 
40 TFN 

INCOME TAX SERVICE • 

Over 25 years combined ex- 
perience, low tax fees, tame day 
serviix. Call Commonwealth for 
free estimate, 461-4508. 

407X4-6 



Jk 



OOMINIOMKENNELS 

9tS Doaitalas Bi^. S. 
CTwiapiafcf. VA 23323 
(IN) 547-5922 
Healed/ Air CiNMUlioMd l-adUUcs 
Kxperienccd-PenoiiyiMd Allealioa 

ladoor-INiHtoor Rmm 
Visilon Welciinc By AppotolaMil 



ALL TYPE8 ALTERNATORS 

and starters repaired. Baulefield 
Auto Electric. Call 547-3230. 

40-TFN 



Mary Luise Semans 



Jankx Carlson 




JiX 12 Dutch Ban 

$795.00 

(CALLTOIMYI 

STATE LINE BUILDERS 

Gan^^ • UtUity Barns • Any Si^ 
||^ck,N.C.279« JWLEWe 






llABY! ITTING • Regular basis, 
excelleni care, hoi lunches, and 
snacks. Lots of attention. 
Sparrow Road area, call 420- 
4239. 

424T3-I6 



4i.CifpiBlvy 



CARPENTRY, PAINTING. 
ROCNING - and all types of 
maintenanM. Storm windows, 
gutters and screens repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanders Con- 
struction. 4204453. 

41 TFN 



41. 



PRfSTON PEST CONTROL - 

We don't require a contractr 
special |mcc on commercial and 
apartmenu, monthly rate, most 
3 room homes or mobile homes 
$15. CaU for free estimate at 543- 
1898. 

45 4T4-6 

MASTER PEST Control - 
Scientific rxterroination. Sand 
and moisture control, windowsill 
and jolce repair, house jacking. 
Free Termite inspection. $5 off 
on termite control, $50 off on 
roach control with this ad. 
F.H.A. & V.A. reporu given. 
CaU 487-4024. 

45-66t-3/9/J4 



^f . HBBM nBpfvVBBNn* 



ADDITTONS - Rooms, garai^, 

convert garages, decks, etc. 

Quality work by a licensed 

builder. Free estimates. CaU 340- 

2511. 

47 TFN 

ADDITIONS, ROOMS - car- 
pentry, roofing, tiding, storm 
window, storm doon, plastering, 
ele^jic, concrete work, plum- 
bing, guttering, remodeling, kit- 
chen and baths, brick and Mock 
work, aluminum siding, 
fireplaces, carptUng painting, 
spcdaUziag in parkii^ areas and 
driveways, all type of 
dmolHipn. f^ eattmatc without 
nbljliatipn, prompt service. Ser- 
ving all of Tidewater. Bonded 
and Insured, State Registered. 
CaU 05-7435, 623-6148, or 499- 
5516. 

47.TFN 






ANMR80N RCMOIWUNG • 

AU types of home rqwirs. Pain- 
ting, roofing, siding, orpentry, 
etc. Work guaranteed. Free 
estimates. Insured and bonded. 
CaU 588-2558. 

49 TFN 



SI. 



WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTlNG-FMt and friendly 
service, local references fur- 
nished. Call us for a free 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contracton. 420- 
3471. 

5ITFIf 



PAINTING • Large or imail 
jobs. Intoior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
inKes. Referoiccs available upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, nd light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

51 TFN 



S2> rWlBIPBpBy 



THE LEIGH PHOTOGRA- 
PHIC SERVICE - Offers fuU 
covtfase of your needs at yo«ir 
wedding. PleaK caU for more in- 
formation and open dates. 482- 
1312. 

52-TFN 



BATHROmi RnmOEUNG • 

Old and new. Specializing in 
ocraaic tile walls and floor 
covering. Reasonablr rates. Free 
catfaia. 30 yean experience in 
Tidewater area. S^ail and iarfe 
ioiw. GtMramee aU work. CaB 
547-4774 anytime. 

55TFN 



sa. icv^tf a atenMiH 



SEARS SEWING MACHINa • 

I with crtiact, S75. I wiUww 
c*biM($25.C^ttO-77l9. 

% TFN 




20 Virginia Beach Sun, March 16, 1983 




Wynne Motor Corp. - Quality Late-Model AutomobUes. 



Since early 1958, Wyn- 
ne has- been a name 
associated with excellent 
automotive dealerships in 
Tidewater. The name, the 
new location and new 
spaces, and the selection 



of Mr. Jeff Wynne as 
owner operator present a 
formidable combination 
that should prove to be 
Wynne Motor Cor- 
poration's formula for 
success! Presently located 



at 6414 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, the new firm 
handle^ quality late-model 
autmnobiles. The original 
Wynne Motor Corp. was 
started by Jeff's father 
Dubby Wynne back in 



1^38 at 21st and Colonial 
Avenue in Norfolk. In 
1977 the operation moved 
to 1414 South Military 
Highway, the present 
location of Greenbrier 
Chrysler Plymouth Im- 



l 



SPECIAL OF THE WEEK 
1981 Datsun 280 ZX 

Grand Luxury Package which includes power windows, dual reclining seats, AM-FM 
cassette, power remote mirrors, cruise control, delay wipers, lighted passenger vanity 
mirror. New Bridgestone Potenza Radial tires. 15,000 miles. One oiwner, like Brand New. 



Turbo ZX. It's An 
Awesome Feeling 

Listen closely! There it 
is. Hear it? That barely 
audible, high-pitched 
tone. That's a turbo 
charger spinning at 
100,000 revolutions per 
minute. That's awesome. 
That's power. And that's 
just one of the things that 
puts the Datsun Turbo 
280-ZX ahead of 
everything else. 

The Turbo ZX builds 
on the Z.-Car l^end and 
redefines high performan- 



ce. The power of its tur- 
bocharged, 2.8 liter, 
overhead-cam, fuel- 
injected engine... the han- 
dling of its power-assisted 
rack-and-pinion steering., 
the sure stopping power of 
its four-wheel, power- 
assisted disc brakes— can 
only be described by one 
word:awesome. 

The moment you take 
control of the Turbo ZX, 
the loop closes. Man and 
machine become as one. 
The controls and in- 
struments are right there; 



the seats hold you just so; 
the car responds like an 
extension of your mind 
and body. 

The Balance Of Power 

What is it about the 
280-ZX that stirs people's 
juices? Perhaps it satisfies 
the moods and impulses 
that make us tick. We pick 
and choose the mood to fit 
the moment, and the rest 
of the time we stay in 
balance. 

Balance, That's it. The 
280-ZX has performance 
that's awesome, but at the 



same time it's as luxurious 
as a first-class compar- 
tment on the Orient Ex- 
press. Its seats hug us. Its 
air conditioning keeps us 
comfy. Its AM/FM 
multiplex stereo soothes 
us with music. One day, 
we drive to the market and 
pack the ample storage 
area under the hatch with 
groceries for the week; the 
next day we're slicing 
through the switch-backs 
of a mountain road, heel - 
and-toeing throttle and 
brake, flicking through 
the gears. 




Perry Buick 

Presents The 

1983 
Buick Full Line 



March Into 
RK Today... 




1982Chevelte4 0r. 
Stock #6113 Featuring 
Stereo radio, this car 
is a great buy! Special 
Savings Price '5,600 



1982 Corvette 
Slock #6532 Loaded 
with every option that 
makes this car special 
and famous. A Musi 

See.Ovfr Deakr Cos« 2% 



1982 Malibu 4 Door. 
Automatic transmission, air conditioning, 
stereo and many extras. This beautiful 
automatic features size and fuel-economy, so g^ 



_ 



I SI |)( \KS|»|( 



PERRY BUICK 



MIS VnCINIA BEACH BLVD. 
IN NORFOLK AT NEWTOWN ROAD 

SERVING TIDKWATER 
OVER 52 YEARS 

461-S855 



1981 PLYMOUTH RELIANT 

4 dr.. beige, 4 cyL, aulonulk 
IransmiitsioR, power sleering, 
power brakes, air condiUoiiiiig, 
slock no. 13564 *4995 

IMI FORD I UTURA 

2 dr., maroon, aulomalk tran- 
smission, air conditioning, 
stereo tape deck, slock no. 

15SIA *4995 

1977 GRAND PRIX 
SUver, V-S engine, automatic 
transmission, air coMlitionIng, 
extra clean, slock no. in3A 

•4995 



nm 



CHIVROin 



1977 GRAND PRIX 
Silver, 4 tcpeed transmission, 
power steering, air condiliong, 
stereo, stock no. 6544B 

•4795 

1979 CHEVY NOVA 
4 dr., bine, 6 c}l., antoaialif 
transfflbsion, power steering, 
power brakes, air condliioniag, 
low miles, stock no. I336A 

•3895 

19g I CUTLASS CALAIS 
Green, two lone, V-« en^nc, 
automatic transmission, air 
coBditioning, caiaellc, slock 
no. I3MA '710^ 



LYNNHflVtN PKWY 

AT 

VA BtflCH BLVD 



486-2222 




Wynne Motor Corp.. located at 6414 Va. Beach Blvd. 



periaJ Van world. 

"Our intent is to handle 
the cleanest late model 
used automobiles and 
trucics in the area and of- 
fer a two year or 24,000 
mile warranty with every 
purchase to provide the 
customer with a 'secure" 
feeling with every pur- 
chase," said Jeff recently. 

"There is, and always 
will be, a tremendous 
demand for quality 



automobiles, reasonably 
priced and we look for- 
ward to the expanding 
market of the 80's with 
optimism. 

What we intend to 
remain ever aware of is 
our reputation, which we 
will uphold come what 
may, because the 
customer is first with us, 
and they always have 
been, and always will be," 
said Wynne. 



For Quality Used Cars 

At Reasonable Prices 

C^ 

461-6800 



WYNNE MOTOR 
CORP. 



•I2.W5 



\;h} !i \ 1-1 \ ■>.. /\ 



12.55V 



III M K KM, \l I 



'5,W5 



Ni II \ i-i \ ;i(ii I M 

\.ii.. \ I \St I M 



M,895 



|N( I I I I NS 



\M 1 M ■^iiun ( 



'' ( li)ih s(iii-,, S(i( 



4,195 



24 MONTH. 24.000 MILE WARR 



IWH 



VVVNM MOrORCORP 



Mr. Jeff Wynae, Owner-Operator, Wynne Motor Corp. 



4c»i-oN(H; 




First Time Ever! 



NOW AVAILABU 
WITH 

•.a LITUI Misn„ 





KLINE Chevrolet 



1495 S. Military Highway 

3 Miles South Of Military Circle 424- 1811 



TOIMHVtMIMI. 
INSTJUmAKB4IZI 







11.9% 

Financing 



You don't give up 

a thing at Budget where you're ffl 

• Low rates by tte day, weekcmi or longer 

• Free pick np and delivery 

• Most major credit cards honored 

• For out-of-town racrvalions, toll frcc> 

dial "1" & then 800-527-0700 

FOR LOCAL RESERVATIONS CALL 

Norf irih inleniaiiumt Ainiorl - NorfiA. Va ISS-MSS 

MM N. MIMtwy Hwf . - Norf«*, V« KS-iaJt 

331t Vlr^nia BcMh Mvd. ■ Vk^tt IckIi. Vi 340-S413 

Filridi H««y Altport - NcivyaH Newg, V« l74-$794 

1I4M JrffWTO* Ave. - Newport Newi. V« S99-31S2 

1740 Pocahonlas Trail -WMHiAwi.Va. 2M-3SU 




■ tl Hi i* i iil » i ^l >^ 



On All New 

Pontiacs and 

Volvos 

Parkway 



420-5450 



mm 



«p 






Senator Joe 
Canada^ on left, ex- 
pects competition in 
the 8th District in 
Nov.; Councilman 
Bob Jones is seriously 
considering opposing 
Canada; and Dr. 
Clarence Holland^ on 
right, will face a 
Republican candidate 
in the 7th. 



Canada 



Jones 



Holland 



For State Senate 



Canada Wants Opponent; 
Jones Not 'Committed' 



By Greg Goldfarb 
Sun Editor 

The State Senate veteran A. Joseph Canada, Jr. 
expects oppositicm in the November election. But from 
whom? The Republican has been opposed for his seat 
three times before, but a challenger has yet to take the 
8th District Wginia Beach seat away from him. 

At-large Virginia Beach Gty Councilman Robert G. 
"Bob" Jones is the only man, thus far, publicly 
ccmsidering opposing Canada. But, he has not made up 
his mind. 

"The fact is that I haven't finally committed," he 
said from his office on South Lynnhaven Road. "I've 
been in the ball game long enough to know it's going to 
take a good organization, a lot of committee pe(^le, and 
more money than I've ever spent cm a campaign." 

Jcmes ran unsuccessfiilly for the House of Delegates 
in 1982, losing by 314 votes. Last spring he was 
^elected to council, thus indirectly adding another 
reason to his skepticism about running. 

"The fact is that I haven't finally 
committed. I've been in the ball game 
long^nough to know it's going to take a 
good organization, a lot of committee 
people, and more money than I've ever 
spent on a campaign" - Bob Jones, 
possible Senate can didate 

"I'm <*viously reluctant to go back to the pecqjle who 
elected me to city council," he said. He said some of his 
supporters might reason, "and now you want me to 
contribute to get you crff that (council) and on 
something else?" 

JcHies said his reason for considering running for the 
senate seat is much the same as he had in running for 
the House. 

"I w«ild very much like to be in the Virginia General 
Assembly," he said. He also said he c«ild be more 



effective than Canada. 
"Hike Joe. J^think he's a very nice person," Joies, 

"I'd be disappointed if I didn 't have 
opposition" - Senator Joe Canada 

an attorney, said. "I think the realities of the political 
structure crfthe senate of Virginia, as Dr. Holland said, 
is that the Republicans don't do much for their 
constituents.' I really think I can do a lot more in the 

See CANADA, Pm* 9 



"No Preference*' 

Holland Doesn't Care 
Who Challenges Him 

By Greg Goldfarb 

Sun Editor 

Hs father, Sbirley T. Holland, served in the Virginia 
House of Delegates from 1946 to 1966. His brother, 
Rich«<l. has tervisd four years in the state senate. And 
now Dr. Qarence A. HoUand, after 12 years on city 
council, including two as mayw, is running for the 
senate, 7th District. 

Hdland has been resting from council for a year now. 
He has had a chance to look back over his years in 
office, and also to reflect over his political future. Fran 
his medical office on Pleasure House Road, Holland 



All Virginia Beach 
Delegates To Run Again 

In addititm to two senate races on the Nov. 8 
ballot, all five House of Delegate seats will be 
open. However, all the incumbents intend to 
retain them. 

Delegate QeM B. McOanan, (D), 84th 
EHstfict, 12 years in the House. 

Running? "I expect to." 

Challengers: "I hope not." 

Goal? "I want to give as much craistructive 
service to the people of th^ 84th District that I 
possibly can." 

Dekgatc J.W. "Bily" O'Brien, (D), 83rd 
District, 10 years. — 

Running? "Yes." 

ChaUengers: "No. Nfat Yet. I'm sure I will." 

Goal? "It was my bill that came very close to 
sucweding in 1981 in changing the road 
allocation. That's one of the greatest issues in 
Vu-ginia Beach. I also came very close in the 
lottery." 

W.R "Bwter" O'Brien, (R), 82nd ESstrict, 

four years. 
Running? "As far as I know; I'm sure I'm going 

to." 

Challengers: "I don't know yet." 

Delegate JnUe L Smltli, (D), 85th District, one 
year. 

Running? "Yes." 

ChaUengers: "I don't have Vae vaguest idea. I 
don't perceive any diaOenge in the Democratic 
party." 

Goal? "I just got elected one year ago. It takes 
some time to get anythmg done in any legislative 
body. If reelected, htwwver, I have a good shot at 
being qjpointed to the nx^ committee." 

Deici^ 0«iCB B. FklKtt. (D), 81st District, 12 
^ars. 

Running? "Yes." 

Challengers: "I would hope not." 

Goal? "There are some jwojects I've been 
working an...ttaitt I feel Uke I have an insight, the 
time ami knowtedge that has been acquired and I 
wouM Uke to ^ their continuatioo. 



Oberndorf Or Heischober? 

"/ think you're talking about two different can- 
didates. You have one candidate who has fairly high 
name identification. You have another candidate who 
has shown some abUlty In his short time to work with 
peoi^ at maybe a Uttk better level than the other 
one. " - Dr. Oarence HoUand, State Senate candidate 



said that the General Assembly's recent redistricting 
actions, giving Virginia Beach two full senate seats 
instead of one. really prompted his intention to run. 

Why is HdO»Bd running? 

"I think as much as anything else, a brand new seat 
being created with no incumbent in the seat; and it's an 
opportunity for Virginia Beach to have at least half of its 
population served; and hopefully, if I'm elected, I wUl 
be a member of the senate of the dominant party," 
Hdland said. "We hfve not had a member to represent 
SeeNO,Pate9 



Political Biographies 

The following are biographies prepared by can- 
didates, and some possible candidates for Virginia 
Beach's two senate races. 

A Jmeph Canada, Jr.. 928 HoUiday Point. 
Bom, May 8, 1939 in Lynchburg, Va. He 
graduated from Hampden-Sidney College, Hamp- 
den-Sydney, Va., in 196S. with a B.A. degree and 
from the T.C. Williams Schod of Law, University 
(rf Richmond, Richmond, Va., in 1965. 

He has been an aid to the Secretary of Ifealth, 
Education and Welfiwe, Washingtcm, D.C., and 
served as an assistant axnmonwealth's attorney, 
Vtfginia Beach, from 1965 to 1967. He has been in 
private i»'a(tice since 1967. 

Canada's dvic affrurs include, former secretary 
ami legal counsel, Virginia Beach Jay(xes; 
Princess Anne lion's Qub, past president; board 
0[ directors, the Virginia Counsel on Akdidism 
ami Drug DependeiKX, Inc.; board erf directors, 
^ginia Beach Boys' Oub; board of directors. Big 
Brothers (rf Virginia Beach, be; board of 
directors, Ais^tkan Council of Young Pditical 
Leaden; ^^inia Trial Lawyers Association, 
member; Virginia Beach, and Virginia State Bar 
Assodittion, member; Virginia Wildlife Federa- 
tion, member. 

His {»-esent political position is sute senator, 
8th districUjPty <rf Vu-ginia Beach. He was 
elwted to the senate in 1971 . 

Political at^ivitks indiule. Republican State 
Senate Ceim^ Committee, nKmber; steering 
ommittee far Oongressman O. William White- 
hurst's 1972 onqMUgn, member; state a>-chair- 
man, Reagan far President oimmittee; seqnKl 

SeeK»JTICAL.P^9 -^ 




Shamrock Runners 



Tom Thomas of Hickory, N.C. (1756); Bill Dclk of Alolhign, Va. (1 192); and Ernest Parson of Newport Newt wcft Miiong 1,900 
runners in recent Shamrock Marathon, Story, page 7. 



^Partners In Aftercare ' 



Program Helps Troubled Teenage Girls 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Suff Writer 

They are called "in- 
corrigible," the 11 
Virginia Beach girls bet- 
ween 13 and 21 years-old 
sentenced last year by the 
city's Juvenile and 
Domestic Relations District 
Court to serve from seven 
to 10 months in the state- 
run Bon Air Learning 
Center near Richmond. 

"They have no respect 
« T authority, and they 
have proven again and 
again that they are unable 
to abide by any limits set 
by authority figures," said 
Susan L. Woolf, a 
probation counselor for 
the Juvenile and Domestic 
Relations District Court. 
Their crimes, she said, in- 
clude car theft, truancy, 
running away, hitch- 
hiking, and breaking of 
curfews and probations. 

But, Woolf em- 
phasized, society can ill- 
afford to lock up these 
girls and throw the keys 
away. "These are not 
criminals," she said. 
"These arc all very nice 
young ladies who are just 
a little mixed up." 

The most crucial period 
during the rehabilitation 
comes after the girls have 
been released from the 
facility, Woolf said. 
"Most people have a real 
horrible vision of what 
plac^ like Bon Air are 
really all about," she said. 
Consequently, the girls 
have difficulties blending 
in at their old schools, 
within their families and 
in the job market. 

"They need a friend; 
someone to tell them, 
'Hey, you're okay,"' said 
Woolf. 

Six months ago, Woolf 
helped design and im- 
plement a new volunteer 
program which provides 
camaraderie for troubled 
girls called "Partners in 
Aftercare." There are 
currently nine Virginia 
Beach girls who have been 
commited to the state 
department of correc- 
tions, and because of the 
program, each has been 
pair^ up with a "par- 
tner" back in Virginia 
Beach. 

"Partners" arc women 
from the community who 
have volunteered to be 
friends for the girls. They 
write letters to the girls 
once a week while they are 
incarcerated. They visit 
the girls once a month at 
the institution. They help 
the girls adjust to the out- 
side world upon release by 
providing friendship, sup- 
port and transportation 
for job-hunting. They 



continue to see the girls 
for at least four hours per 
week for six months 
following release. 

Partners undergo four 
weeks of intensive 
training, which includes 
instruction in preparation 
for setbacks and failures, 
curfew and rules of 
probation, peer infor- 



mation, jobs and appren- 
ticeship information, and 
games kids play. Also, 
partners observe the 
juvenile court and they 
tour the Bon Air facility. 

Qualifications to be a 
partner include having 
time to invest in the 
training and with the girls, 
a stable home life and per- 



sonality, a proven ability 

to establish rapport with 

■teenagers, and a 

willingness to accept 

See PARTNERS, Page 6 



Special Study Denied 



Council Chooses Thalia 



By Lee CahilJ 
Sun Council Reporter 
Virginia Beach will go 
ahead with plans to con- 
struct its central library at 
Thalia. 

City Council Monday 
afternoon voted 9-2 
against a prc^al to 
change the location of the 
90,000 square-foot, $11 
million project to a site at 
Tidewater Community 
Cdlege (Ml Princess Anne 
Road. 

Councilman Jack 
Jennings Jr. supported 
the TCC plan as the more 
econcMnical because the 
city owns the property and 
because of the assistance 



which migh be forthcom- 
ing from the State as a 
joint project with the com- 
munity college. He also 
thought the location of the 
library there would be 
beneficial because of its 
proximity to the high tech 
industrial park. 

On Feb. 14 he submitt- 
ed his proposal and asked 
the Library Board and city 
staff to assess the cost and 
benefits of locating the 
new central library on 
city-owned property 
adjacent to Tidewater 
Community College's Vir- 
ginia Beach Campus and 
the prc^Ksed new high 



Mrs. G. Bush 
To Visit Beach 

The Edocatioa Com- 
mtttcc of the ^rglnla 
Bcadh Chamber of Onb- 
mcrcc hat annoiuKcd 
tluit Mrs. BarlNua Bull 
wJH be in VbMt Beach 
on Tuesday, April 19 to 
address iMrticipaats la 
the Chamber-sponsored 
Business Indostry Edn- 
cation Day. 

Mn. Bush Is the wife 
irf Vice PrctideBt George 
Bush. 



teach industrial park. 

Jennings said Monday 
afterncKxi he was "sur- 
prised and disappdnted" 
with the response sub- 
mitted by the Library 
Board and library staff in 
a report dated March 2. 
He said the report was 
merely a justification for 
the llialia site, on V\t- 

Sec THALIA, Pages 




With crafU for the apcoming sale, left to right are: Barbara Chalkiey, pretiiknt. 
Sea Sprite arde of the King's Daughter's Hospital; Hekn McDonald, bazaar 
project ckairraaB; and Flora Dunham, poblicity chairman. 



The Sea Sprite Circle of the King's Etoughtera, 
Mrs. Barbara Chalkiey, pr^ident, will hold a luri- 
cheon, card party and bazaar on Thursday April 
21 at 10:30 a.m. at the Health Education Building 
of General Hospital of Virginia Be«;h. Mrs. 
Helen McDonald is Chairman of the event. 

Tickeu may be obtained from any meml«r of 
the Circle or by contacting Mrs. Mary Lou Brick- 
house 340-5141 , ticket chairman. 



Sea Sprite 
Women Plan 
Bazaar 



■Hi 






■«■■■■■ 



HMl 



m 



^Virginia Beach Sun, March 23, 1983 



-i»"*' 



/ 



Sun Commentary 



> ♦ 




4 



Editorials 



Political Fever 



It's springtime, and political fever is 
here. 

Catching it early was Meyera Ober- 
ndorf and Harold Heischober, both 
republicans, one of whom will oppose Dr. 
Clarence Holland for the newly created 
7th senatorial district seat. 

The Republicans will hold a nominating 
convention in June to determine which of 
the two current at-large council members 
will contest Holland. Holland says he 
doesn't care who wins; he'll campaign the 
same against either, he says. 

In the 8th district, Joe Canada is sitting 
back, waiting to see if he'll be opposed for 



his fourth term in the senate. He is aware 
that at-large council member Bob Jones is 
eyeing the seat, but is not overreacting to 
the prospect. In fact, he is reacting very 
little. Canada expects to be opposed. 
Jones, however, does not want begin a 
rigorous campaign, without plenty of 
support. In the House, no challengers so 
far. 

It's still early, but in the upcoming 
months local residents can expect to see 
plenty of politics between now and 
November. Hopefully, the issues will be. 
defined, and the campaigning pure. 
— G.D.G. 



Partners 



If not for the community-minded 
spirits of many Virginia Beach citizens, 
one may suspect that some wheels of the 
city's governmental machine might 
quickly come to a screeching halt. 

One city department which is vitally 
reliant upon voluntecrism is the Juvenile 
and Domestic Relations District Court. 
According to Judge John K. Moore the 
court could not function without such in- 
»dividuals. 

Specifically, Moore is addressing a new 
program called "Partners in Aftercare," 
designed to aid female juveniles work 
their way back into the mainstream of 
society after release from the state correc- 
tional facility. The program is conducted 
entirely by volunteers, 10 of them to be 
exact, who are coordinated by one city 
employee. 

"We don't have the funding to perform 
this service," said Mpore. "Without' the 
volunteers, we couldn't even function." 

Moore says the fortitude displayed by 
the volunteers in the Partners in Aftercare 
program is exemplary of the spirit of 
Virginia Beach residents. Indeed, volun- 
teerism abounds all over this city. 

Witness such organizations as the 
volunteer rescue squad, hospital 
auxiliaries. Meals on Wheels, scouting 
and youth sports programs. There are the 
many fine projects undertaken by civic 



groups such as the Jaycees, the Rotary 
clubs, the Chamber of Commerce and the 
many women's and senior citizens 
organizations. All such groups provide 
much-needed services to Virginia Beach. 
All are extremely reliant upon their mem- 
bers donating their time and efforts free 
of charge. 

These facts are not lost upon the city's 
leaders. Every year, a special dinner is 
held to honor Virginia Beach's volun- 
teers. This year, the Seventh Annual 
Volunteer's Recognition dinner is slated 
for Wednesday, March 23 at 7 p.m. in the 
Pavilion, hosted by the city council and 
the mayor's office. More than 1,900 
volunteers are expected to be honored. 

At The Virginia Beach Sun, there is a 
profound respect and sense of admiration 
for these volunteers. That is why several 
months ago, this newspaper launched a 
new regular feature called "Citizen-of- 
the-Week," designed to highlight the 
otherwise unheralded acts of these unsung 
individuals. 

If you would like to nominate someone 
for citizen-of-the-week, simply send a let- 
ter to The Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, 
Virginia Beach, 234S2, or call the 
newspaper at 486-3430. 

Each of these individuals has an impor- 
tant story to be told. Help us to tell those 
stories.— M.M.G. 



Education 



Ihe recently created Education Com- 
mittee of the Virginia Beach Chamber of 
Commerce has announced that Mrs. Bar- 
bara Bush, the Vice President's wife, will 
visit Virginia Beach on Tuesday, April 19. 
That's not bad news coming from a com- 
mittee which was just put together at the 
beginning of 1983. 

The committee has only had two formal 
meetings. At the first, some ideas were 
discussed. At the second, some ideas were 
implemented. Mrs. Bush will come to the 
city for two hours, just long enough to 



discuss the importance of the relationship 
between business and industry and the 
public school system. For example, what 
qualities do businesses desire most from 
students? Are they being adequately 
trained to compete and contribute in the 
business world? Questions, and others 
like these, will be the topic of a one day 
program, sponsored by the education 
committee and the Chamber. Mrs. Bush's 
presence on that day certainly speaks well 
for the Chamber, the school system, and 
the entire city.— G.D.G. 



More Letters 



On The Line 



EcUtw: 

Cmnnionwealth's Attorney Paul Sciortino has laid it 
on the Une. Without ti^e f^inding, his office is going to 
be unable to prosecute some crimes. 

Criminals should be prosecuted to the full extent of 
the law. Otherwise, we are wasting our policeman's 
time and making a mockery of justice. 

S<xnehow, the money hu to be made available for 
Sciwtino to do his j(*. 

Sally Taylor 
^rginia Beach 



Noona Affair 

Editor: 

Y«ir story or the Walter Noona affair was a succmct 
capsule of the situation, and it gave a clear, 
well-rainded overview. 

My personal opinion is that the Virginia Orchestra 
Group may have made a big misuke in firing Noona. 
He was very pupular in Virginia Be«:h, and*people 
from Virginia Be^h might resent his firing and opt not 
to attend any further VOG events. 

Mrs. Shirley Johmon 
^Virginia Be»:h 



Letters To ffie£^r 

Reader Writes Robb After Article On Police Assaults 



Editor: 

After reading your March 9 article on police assaults, 
I wrote the following letter to Governcv Robb and 
present it .here for your publication. 

Regarding House Bill 220.. .A negative opicm. 

I am a respectable businessman who pays taxes in 
Virginia Beach. I am both a Commander in the U.S. 
Naval Reserve and the ex-president of PTA of a local 
elementary scho(4. Since my business invdves selling 
services and a product, it is to my distinct advantage to 
be able to "get along" with people. 

About a month ago I was stopped by two experienced 
Virginia Beach pdicemen for "driving 10 miles per 
hour under the posted speed limit..." For openen, the 
pdicemen were abusive, antagonistic and self-admit- 
tedly looking for trouble. (I was driving my IS year dd 



Thank You For MS Coverage 



Editor: 

Thank you fot the recent coverage of the Arrest 
MS fimd-raiser held on behalf of the Multiple 
Schlerosis Society at the Lynnhave Mall. The 
article which appeared in the March 16 issue 
promotes public awareness of the problem of 
multiple sclerosis and related neurdogical 
diseases which affect more than 500,000 ameri- 

cans. 

One minor cwrection to an otherwise perfect 
story is the fact that Richard Hppin, Jr. of the life 
Federal Savings and Loan Associatioi at Hilltop 
had spOTSOTship support of $150.75, not $50.75. 

Many of our Virginia Beach participants arc 

perscmal friends of Bill Q^s. former employee of 

the Virginia Beach Data Processing Department, 

who was diagnosed with MS approximately three 

years ago. Bill now uses a wheelchair and enjoyed 

the festivities at the Lynnhaven Mall that day, and 

jdns me in a grateful expressioi of gratitude to 

The Virginia Beach Sun and to the many arrestees 

who helped to make this event such a resounding 

success. 

Robert F. Kelley, 

Executive Krecta:, 
Natiwial Multiple- 
Sclerosis Society, 
Tidewater Chapter 



daughter home from a dance lesswi, and middle-aged 
men in such a situation can be armed and extremely 
dangerous!) , 

The bottom line was: These experienced men 
systematically pushed and (Utcrally) dragged me down 
the street with a manner and attitude which I last saw 
exhibited in South East Asia. 

Having had a very, very stressful day, week, and 
month, I was pushed to the pdnt of having to seriously 
COTsider the necessity of defending myself physically... 
It was a real possibility at <mc pdnt, and therein Ues the 
problem with House Bill Number 220! 

If the mandatory prison sentence provisicms had been 
in effect, and had I, in fear for my perscmal safety, 
presumed to defend against the completely unwarrant- 
ed physical restraints of aie of these men, 1 would be in 
jail at this moment. 

Granted, I had the sense nd to do something stupid; 
but with all due modesty, I am a very intelligent person 
(MBNSA #1003587) and a trained operatitmal thinker 
(Naval Academy, '61). What of those who use less 
fo-ethought and who are provoked into a rash act? 
What of the police officer who is, by nature, a bully? 
Both of these catagories of individual exist in numbers 
far greater than we wish to admit, so what happens 
when they inevitably meet? Bingo! A jail sentence ioi a 
dullard who might better be out earning a living and 
paying taxes. 

Additional pdnts: Our local Qmimonwealth's Attor- 
ney has stated that his case load was such that he may 
have to curtail prosecutiOT of some felonies which are 
presently wi the books. 

We don't have the space in our jails and prisons for 
those who are there now. Pdice officers in Virginia 
Beach have resOTted to civil suits against their 
attackers, aJid according to The Virginia Beach Sun 
they "all" win their cases. What better way is there? 

A conplaint to Virginia Beach authwities illicited, 
gratuitiously, comments frcrni two sources that "some 
of our officers are overly cautious." 

House Bill 220 is a blanket of immunity which certain 
officers and local ties will use to cloak their general 
inability to d^al with difficult situations in a peaceful, 
non-belliger^t manner. Its passage would be a giant 
step backwai^ds.. Bull Comer justice. 

As a Marine Captain, how many times did an enlisted 
man attack you? Was it because of some article in the 
UCMJ or was it because of the way that you carried 
yourself? From your own experience would you say that 
any officer, be ht USMC or Vu-ginia State Police, can 
totaUy avdd physical attack problems provided he 
exercises his authaity firmly, but with respect fw, the 

individuals with whom he deals? 

David Timm, 
Vurginia Beach 



For Running Books 



Run to The Library 



Library 
SUHIines 

9f Vh^ati jtgtchJlbrMtM D»vM rttaat 




Recently, the Virginia Beach Oceanft^ont was the site 
of the annual Shamrock Marathon. This event marks 
the beginning of Tidewater's spring running season. 
During the next few months, it will be ahnost 
impossible not to encamter ruimers as they dash for 
the finish line of various local marathons. 

Although these running events attract literally 
thousands of participants, the number of local 
non-competitive runners is even more astounding. This 
all goes to prove that running can no longer be called a 
fad. It is, in fact, a way of life for many Hampton Roads 
residents. 

For the last few years, the five area libraries of the 
Virgmia Beach Public library have been developing a 



book coUecti(»i designed to aid runner. Besides the 
standard wc^ks by running gurus James Fixx and 
George Sheehan, the library owns titles such as "The 
Running Expe'rience," "The Complete Runner," 
"Forty Common Errws in Running," and "The 
Hdistic Ruimer." There are running bodes written 
spedfically for women, books which list running trails 
in major U.S. dtles, books which extd the psychic 
power of running, and even biographies of ruimers. 
The list goes on and on. 

If by some chance you injure ycmrself when running, 
the library can also come to the rescue. "The Runner's 
Repair Manual" and "How to Heal Running and Other 
Sports hyuries" are just two titles which are devoted to 
either preventing or curing running injuries. 

Most boda on the subject of running can be found in 
the 7%.426 section of the library, while books abcnit 
running injuries are located in the 614.1027 area. Of 
course, any library staff member will be glad to help 
point the way. Finally, before leaving the library, be 
sure to stop and read the current issue of "Runner's 
Wo-ld" magazine. The Bayside, Great Neck, Ocean- 
front an^ Windsor Woods Area libraries all subscribe. 
CXi, yes. the library also owns a bode called "The Last 
Word on Ruiming"... but don't count on it! 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

The Virginia Beach Sun welcomes and encourages letten to the editor on any and all Virginia Beach 
issues, as well as any other issues, questions or concons affecting the well bdng of the Virginia Beach 
community. Letters should be typed, double spaced and include the writers name, uldress and telephone 
number. Mail letters to The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. Rosemont Road, Virginia B«u;h, Va. 23452. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



138 South Rosemont Road, Virginia Beacii, Va. 23452 Phone (804) 486-3430 
USPS-660-140; Pnlrfished Wednesdays 



Haan^wly 



GrcgGoMfarb 
Editor 

within Tidewater Area 

OneYear-$9 

All Other Areas 

One Year- $11 

TwoYMirs-$17 

Secoi^ Class P(»tage is {nid at Lynnhavoi Station, 

Virginia Brach, Virginia 

The Ki^^Ai^ AocASM/ttoiiTCiikcrorTMVii^teBcKbCSMBiknof Cmmbhcc 



mmmn^ 



hV'u^lnla Beach Happeninss This Week 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 23. 1983 3 

Send your happenings lo The Virginia 
Beach Sun, 138 S. Rosemonl Road,. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Wednesday 



y 



AtBMchBrtols 

Dr. Betty Diener will be the featured speaker at 
the Virginia Beach Chamber of Commerce's 
"Beach Briefs" on Wednesday, March 23 at 7:43 
a.m. at Orion's Roof, CavaUer Oceanfront Hotel, 
42nd Street and Atlantic Avenue. 



Thursday 



Pood Pair At Pombroko Mall 

A "We Have It Made In Virginia" food fair 
will be held March 24 through 26 at Pemborke 
Mall. / 

The food fair will feature product giveaways, 
food samples, prize drawings and free coupons. 

Among the exhibitors are Gwaltney of Smith- 
field, Ltd., Royal Crown Bottling Company of 
Virginia, ITT Continental Baking Company, 
Producers Peanut Company, Inc., Flowers 
Baking Company, Pruden Packing Company, 
Famous Foods of Virginia, Holland Produce and 
Champion Horseradish. 



"Owyt And Dolb" at VWC 

"Guys and Dolls," the spring production by the 
Virginia Wesleyan College theater and music 
departments, is scheduled for March 24-April 2 in 
the college's Hofheimer Theater. 

Curtain time for all shows will be 8 p.m., except 
for Sunday, March 27, when the only show will be 
a 2 p.m. matinee. Tickets are $3 and may be pur- 
chased at the door. However, reservations arc 
required and should be made by calling the college 
at 461-3232. 



National Society Daughters of the American 
Revolution will meet on Thursday, March 24 at 10 
a.m. at the home of Mrs. Guy V. Mallonee, 2704 
Hood Circle. Mrs. M. W. Edwards will serve as 
co-hostess. 

Special guest speaker will be Mr. David Sirg, 
assistant professor of Government at Tidewater 
Community College. His topic will be "We See In 
Political Frwdom the Key to Our Democracy." • 



Friday 



The Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture/ 
Cooperative Extension Service is offering three 
horticulture classes on Thursday, March 24 at the 
Virginia Beach Pavilion. 

Class topics and speakers are: Vegetable Gar- 
dening by Randal Jackson, Extension Agent; 
Gardening with my Friends The Natural Way by 
Jim Kincaid, WVEC and Jeany Carter, New 
Energy Window Systems; and Growing and 
Cooking with Herbs by Grace Sumner, food 
writer, Virginian Pilot /Ledger-Star and Ginger 
Hoggard, McDonald Garden Center. Class times 
are 10 a.m., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m. respectively. There 
is a one dollar per day fee which can be used for 
one or all of the programs. Tickets are available at 
the door. For more information, call 427-4769. 



•oYarmooiit Lnctwro At 

The Adam Thoroughgood Chapter of the 



The Schizophrenia Foundation of Virginia will 
hold a public meeting Friday, Marcyh 2S, at 7:30 
p.m. in the Auditorium of the Center for Effective 
Learning, 233 N. Witchduck Road. 

William W. Garry, Ph.D., Educational Advisor 
f the Commander, Atlantic Fleet Training Com- 
mand, will speak on "Stress Management: Con- 
trol Your Stress Before It Controls You." Dr. 
Garry is also President of Octrain, Inc., a 
management consulting firm specializing in the 
design of training programs. He teaches graduate 
courses at Golden Gate University, and has 
studied stress numagement at UCLA School of 
Medicine Extension. . 

Call 486-3983 for more information. 



Saturday 



Amival Ballot Po rf o rw aiico 

The Virginia Beach Community Ballet Com- 
pany will present its annual performance on Sat- 
urday, March 26 at 8 p.m. at the Pavilion Theater. 
This year, for the first time, the Ballet Company 
will be accompanied by the Virginia Beach Com- 
munity Orchestra. 

The highlight of the show will be "Peter and 
The Wolf by Prokofiev, a ballet of special in- 
terest to children, and other dances on the 
program include selections from "Copelia Ballet" 
by Delibes, "Berceuse" from "The Firebird" by 
Stravinsky, and "La Belle Helene" by Offenbach. 

Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for children un- 
der 12 years, and are available at the door. 

Further information may be obtained by calling 
the Ballet Company at 495-0989 or the Pavilion 
Box Office at 428-4222. 

Norwogiaa Lady Coromonlof 

The Ladies Auxiliary to the Virginia Brfach 
Borough Volunteer Fire Department will hold its 
21st annual Norwegian Lady Ceremony on Satur- 
day, March 26 at 2 p.m. 

The Norweigian Lady statue, located at 15th 
Street and Atlantic Avenue, was donated to the 
people of Virginia Beach by the citizens of Moss, 
Norway. 



FARM EQUIPMENr 




Carl Brickhouse 

1R48 Indian Crvek Koud 

(SI.BridciiSrcHon) 
Chesapeake. Va. 
L OCATION: From Norfolk, Va. or Elizabeth City. N.C. or Interstate 
64 East or West, take Battlefield Blvd.. South, Highway 168, to St. Brides 
Union 76 Self-Service Gas Station. Turn onto Indian Creek Road and follow 
auction signs 4'/: miles to sale. 

1-1975 Ford 5000 Diesel Tractor 

(real Clean- 1600 Hrs.) 

1-1964 John Deere 4020 Gas Tractor 

1 - 1964 John Deere 730 Gas Tractor 

1 - John Deere "B" Tractor (For Parts) 

1 - 4 Row Pittsburg Disc Harrow 

1 - 4 Row Long Disc Harrow 

1 - 4 Row Burch Disc B^ders 

I - 4 Row John Deere Middlebuster 

I - 4 Row Cultipacker 

I - 4 Row Ferguson Tillervator 

I - 4 Row Lilliston Rolling Cultivator 

1 - 4 Row John Deere #8300 Grain Drill 

(like new) 

1 - 2 Row Pittsburg Rotary Ho« 

1-3x16 John Deere Bottom Plow 

1-7' Ford Rotary Mower 

1 - 14' Tool Bar 

I - Set of AMCO Hyd. Row Markers 

1 - Clark Weed Sprayer with 100 Gal. 

Stainless Steel Tank 



1-7' Allis-Chalmers Sicklebar Mower 
4 - John Deere 71 Flex Planters 
I - 3 Pt. Sprayer with 100 Gal. 
Stainless Steel Tank & Booms 

1 - John Blue Liquid Fertilizer Rig 
with 150 Gal. Stainless Steel Tank, 3 pt. 

2 - Ford Grader Blades (6' &. T) 3 pt. 
1 - Tractor Tow Cart 
1 - AMCO Drain Digger, 3 pt. 
1 - 200 Bushel Grain Cart 
1 - New Holland *68 Hayliner Bailer 
1 - Oliver 82T Hay Bailer j 
1 - New Idea #400 Hay Rake, 3 pt. 
1-1964 Ford F-600 Truck with 12' 
Grain Body 

1 - 1%I Chev. C-60 Truck with 14* 
Grain Body. 

1 - John Deere Model 55 Gas Self- 
Propclled Combine with Cab, 14' 
Grain Table & 2 Row #234 Corn Head 

2 - 250 Gal. Fuel Tanks with pumps 



New 

Rescue 

Officers 

The Virginia Beach Vol- 
unteer Rescue Squad 
recently elected a new 
slate of officers for 1983. 
They are as follows: 

Captain, Virginia 
aipin; first It., Robert 
Glover; second It., David 
Whitley; supply sgt.. Bill 
Kiley; training officer, 
Bd? Niedzwiecki; secre- 
tary, Bobbye Michaels; 
treasurer, Sid Duval; fund 
drive chairman, Btmner 
Smith; chaplain. Clay 
Qunp; and public rela- 
ti«is officer. Rick Schoew. 
For further, in formation 

k contact Rick Schoew, 

i 428-1649. 



S 



A UCTIONEER'S NOTE: Mr. Brickhouse has discontinued his farming 
operation. This equipment is m good working condition. Most of it is 3 point 
hitch. If you need good equipment. Don't Miss This Auction. EVERYTHING 
SELLS! 
*^ In case of soow on day of auction, sale will be held the following W^aestfay, 
March 30lh, same time. Open for inspection Friday. March 25th, and morning 
before sale. TERMS: CASH OR CHECK. Payment in full on aU purchiaes 
must be made on day of sale to jack Peoples, Bonded Auctioneer. 

MANY nTHEaiTEMST <M> NUMEROUS TO MENTION 

-Saturday MARCH 26, 1983 10:30 A.M.—) 

S 



McRaMM'iMac 



Prisitltiii titcl 



Nirt Rm^mhWcTck AccMnl* 

— ror AMMm^ IrtonMita* Coatact — 

JACK PEOPLES 

Bomied Aactloocer 

1340 Head of River Road 

Chenpeake, Va., 23322 

Pboae (IM) 421-2525 or 421-2360 



LUNCH AVAILABLE 




IJCENSKD AND BONDED IN VIRGINIA & 



Sunday 



SMfOOd TlplilM / 

The Virginia Beach Departmeht of Agriculture/ 
Cooperative Extension Service has a Seafood 
Tipline available 24 hours a day. Topics include 
cooking seafood inside and outdoors, smoking 
fish, preparing soft shell crabs, selecting, buying 
and storage life of all seafood and many others. 
The recorded tapes are changed Mondays and 
Thursdays. 

.If the present message does not answer your 
question, leave your name and number and the 
Home Economist will get back with you. The 
number to call for the tipline is 427-9533. 




L«gcil S«cr«taries M«ttt 

The Virginia Beach Legal Secretaries 
Association will conduct its regular monthly din- 
ner meeting on Monday, March 28 at 6 p.m. The 
meeting will be held at Gus' Fishhouse, 57th Street 
and Atlantic Avenue, Virginia Beach. Casu^ 
Corners will present a wardrobe seminar. 



Tuesday 



The Virginia Beach 4-H Office is seeking pebple 
who are interested in working with the 4-H 
Therapeutic Riding Program. 

There will be an orientation meeting at the 
Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture on 
Tuesday, March 29, beginning at 7:30 p.m. , 

Mr. Leonard Warner, executive director. North 
American Riding for the Handicapped 
Association and Winnie W. Peele, extension 
agent, Virginia Cooperative Extension Service, 
Loudoun County office will be the guest speakers. 
Formore informationc all 427-4617. 

U pcomin g 



stress Lecture At Oceanf rent 

br. Daniel L Darby, a psychiatrist practicing in 
the Virginia Beach^rea, will give a lecture on 
stress management on March 30, at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Oceanfront Area Library in Virginia Beach. 

The lecture will teach participants how to con- « 
trol stressful situations that have ^i^iously con- 
trolled them. Dr. Darby's lecture is intended for 
adults and registration in advance is necessary. 

For more information and to register, contact 
the library at 428-41 13. 



Herticiiltwre Classes 

The Virginia Beach Department of 
Agriculture/Cooperative Extension Service is of- 
fering three horticulture classes on Thursday, 
March 31 at the Virginia Beach Pavilion. 

Class topics and speakers are: Food and Heat 
Producing Solar Greenhouses by Sam Cravotta 
and Jeany Carter, Tidewater Solar Energy 
Association; Selecting, Planting, and Pruning 
Trees and Shrubs by Greg Lonergan, Extension 
Agent; and Insect Pests of Ornamental by Dr. 
Pete Schultz, Entomologist, Research Station. 

Class times are 10 a.m., I p.m., and 3 p.m. 
respectively. There is a one dollar per day fee 
which can be used for one or all of the programs. 
Tickets are available at the door. For more infor- 
mation, call 427-4769. 



•eH Toemdneirt Set Per May 

The First Annual Virginia Beach Crime Solvers 
golf tournament will be held on Friday, May 6 at 



the Hell's Point Golf Course. It begins at 12:30 
p.m., followed by cocktails and buffet. 

Donaticm per player is $100. Funds will be used 
to help support Crime Solvers, which gives money 
awards for information on crimes. , 

Call 427-9205 for more information. 



Pree Pet Care Lecture 

"Heartworm Disease," a free pet care lecture at 
the Virginia Beach Campus of Tidewater Com- 
munity College, will be presented from 7:30 to 
8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 6. 

For more information, contact 428-6201 . 



Of Note 



P, A. Wemen Award Students 

The GFWC Princess Anne Woman's Club of 
Virginia Beach recently sponsored a Good Citizen- 
ship Essay Award, "What It Takes To Be A Good 
American Citizen in the 1980's," and Mrs. 
Preston E. Berry, Public "Affairs Chairman, an- 
nounces the winners: v 

David Bridges, 1st place, $50; Jaaet Rinaldi, 
2nd place, $35; and third place weftt to Renee 
Blanchard, fl5. All students arc-Jrqm Kellam 
High School. ^ 

A $2,000 four-year scholarship, $500 nursing 
scholarship, and three $60 awards for art, music 
and literary achievements will be made. 

Each year the club rotates the awards among the 
local high schools and all this year's winners will 
be from Kellam High School. 



TBA Heners Beachers 

Three Virginia Beach men are among the first of 
seven graduates to receive journeyman cer- 
tification following successful completion of 
Tidewater Builders Association's Manpower 
Training Program. 

Lynn Fontaine, Ron Brady and Tom Butler 
have been awarded journeyman's certificates in a 
special ceremony held at the Lake Wright Motor 
Inn in Norfolk. Fontaine was certified in heating 
Ventilation and air conditioning, Brady in the elec- 
trical field and Butler in building maintenance. 
Other recipients honored at this time were James , 
Gorham of Norfolk and Wallace Brown of Por- 
tsmouth, certified in building maintenance; 
Jerome Harris of Norfolk in bricklaying and 
Michael Gatsby, also of Norfolk, in electrical. 



V 



4001 Attend Dental Health Pair 

The Boys Club of Virginia Beach, 4441 South 
Boulevard, recently held a dental health fair for 
400 boys and girls. 

The fair included dental health care tec^iniques, 
puppet shows, and movies. 

The fair was organized by Mrs. Jerri Voecht, 
the Club's health committee cliairperson, in 
cooperation with faculty and students from 
O.D.U.'s School of Dental Hygiene. 

Cape Henry Wenien Win Mbbens 

The Cape Henry Woman's Club of Virginia 
Beach has been presented three ribbons at the 
recent Tidewater District Arts and Crafts show, 
held in Portsmouth. 

A blue ribbon was won by Mrs. Richard Coradi 
for smocking. Red ribbons were won by Mrs. Fred 
J. .Young for embroidery, candle wickinjr; and 
Mrs. B. Noel Fallwall for quilling and 
miscellaneous. A yellow ribbon was won by Mrs. 
George H. Mullany, Jr. 



Spring Perum Cancelled 

The Virginia Beach Department of Economic 
Devefopment, Spring Forum, on the Tax Equity 
and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982 and Its im- 
plications with respect to industrial revertue bond 
financing, scheduled for Tuesday, March 29, 1983 
at Pavilion Theatre has been cancelled. 

The program will be rescheduled and announ- 
ced at a later date. ^ 



Beach Walk-A-Then Set 

Virginia Beach 7-Eleven employees will march 
in Virginia Beach for the annual March of Dimes 
Walk-a-thon. The beach walk will be held on Sun- 
day, April 24. 

To make a pledge or for more information call 
499-8281. 




Wt can fill all your construction needs 



THIS IS NOT OUR AD BUT, 
ONE FOR OUR CUSTOMERS 



Our organiiafloB has lhriv«l for five >e«r$ wilboui advertisement. 
Our customer refemUs have kept M bwy tni we nould like >oy to 
consider us for ihii upcomiHg addiUoa, improvenent or remodcUHg 
lob. Your home, offtce or teriM» is JmI a reference •»«>. We do Ihe 
Job >oM want, the way yo« waat It tfoac. Our customers tell >ou how. 
Move on up with as. Oof pric«s coiw recommended as well. 



Farming is a continuing 
miracle wrought by the 
hand of God." 

Benjamin Franklin 



OFFSET 



PRINTING 



Decks • Fences • Room Additions • Remodeling 
Alterations • Vinyl Siding • Storm Window & Door 



Free Estimates 



Wayne Gibbs Building & Contracting Co. 



Licensed — Bonded — Stale Registered 



MICHAEL F. 

FASANARO, JR. 

Attorney 
At Law 

461-6121 

5 Koger Executive Center 
SUITE 220 

Norfolk, Va. 23502 



mmmmmi 



m 



m 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, March 23, 1983 



Virsinia Beach $un Hews 




Cravotta 



Covington 

New Design Additions 



Hie Design Cdlabora- 
tive, a Virginia Beach 
architectural firm, has 
announced two new addi- 
ticms to its professional 
staff in recent weeks. 

Margaret G. Covington, 
CSl, specifications writer, 
is a native of Richmond, 
living in Hdewater for the 
last nine years. Educated 
at J.S. Reyndds Com- 
munity College where she 
majored in construction 
management, and Old 
Dominion University 
where she obtained a cost 
estimating certiflcate, 
Mrs. Covington is experi- 
enced in construction con- 
tract lubninistratiOT as 
well. 

She is vice president of 
the Construction Specifi- 
cations Institute, Tide- 



water Chapter, and a 
member of the American 
Business Women's Asso- 
ciation. 

Sam Cravotta, an archi- 
tect with 15 years experi- 
ence, has been active in 
the sdar movement, as 
current vice president of 
the Virginia Sdar Energy 
Assofciatiwi, past presi- 
dent of the Virginia 
Renewable JEnergy Lobby 
and a key speaker at all 
three sdar summits and 
numerous other con- 
ferences. 

He has taught passive 
sdar architecture at the 
cdlege level, had his own 
firm in Winchester, Vir- 
ginia, received five sdar 
design awards and pub- 
lished three conference 
papers. 



WallacS" 
Receives 



Degree 

Nianza Emory Wallace, 
II, recently received his 
Juris Doctorate degree 
from the Detroit College 
of Law, Detroit, 
Michigan. He graduated 
cum laude, and will return 
to his home in Virginia 
Beach. 

During the summer of 
1981. Wallace served a 
clinical internship in Lon- 
don, England, under the 
sponsorship of the 
Syracuse University 
College of Law. He 
received his ,B.A. in 
history and political scien- 




Wallace 



ce from Virginia Wesleyan 
College in Norfolk, 
Virginia, in 1974. 

Wallace is married to 
the former Christine Anne 
Gaudreau; he is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Nianza E. 
Wallace of Virginia 
Beach. 



Sun On Interview Show 



Staff writer Mike 
Gooding of TAe Virginia 
Beach Sun recently ap- 
peared on "Tidewater 
Lifestyles," a variety/talk 
show on Cox Cable tele- 
vision's channel 1 1 . 

Gooding discussed the 
role of the community 
newspaper, his career, and 
some of the more in- 
teresting stories he has 
covered for the 



newspaper. The show was 
videotaped live at Pem- 
broke Mall. 

Appearing with 
Gooding on the program 
was Lewis McGehee, a 
singer and songwriter who 
performs regularly in 
Virginia Beach nightclubs. 

A spokesperson for the 
station said the show will 
air Monday, April 4 at 8 
p.m. 



Corrections/Clarification 

In last week's issue, the lead story accidently omitted 
the fact that, as everybody knows, Meyera Oberndorf 
dropp«l her law suit against Harold Heischober. Also, 
the cutline under the "Maloney Honored" picture was 
misleading. A memorial was not being dedicated in the 
late Daniel Maloney's name. Actually, the Virginia 
Beach Police Training Center was renamed the Daniel 
T. Maloney Police Training Center, in the slain Virginia 
Beach police officer's honor. 

At the most recent professional boxing and kick- 
boxing matches in Virginia Beach, Beach kick-boxer 
David James won a first-round TKO over Jim Herley. 




B.B. FULK 

OPTICAL COMPANY 



OPENING SPECIALS 



— FREE— 

Bottle of Eyeglass Cleaner 

PLUS 

Have Your Glasses Adjusted, Too! 

5847-B Poplar Hall Dr. 

Norfolk, Virginia 23502 

(beside Military Circle-«a-oss from Legsetu) 



461-3515 

RXOptidaB 
BevFolk 



Magnifiers 
Ray-Ban Sunglasses 



Hours: Mon-Fri 9-3 :«) 
Sat 9-1 
(No Appointment N«xssa 



Some Beachers Feel Fertilizing Urge 



Most Virginia Beach homeowners feel an urgent 
need to fertilize their lawns every spring. Spring and 
summer feeding of Bermudagrass, zoysia and centi- 
pede is required, but not recommended fw fescue 31. 

Fertilizer is c(Misidered by many turf professicaials as 
the most important management factor. Color, root 
devel(q}ment, food reserves, vigor, cold and heat 
tderance, arid insect and disease problems are 
influenced by fertilizer use. 

Nitrc^en is the most important single nutrient in 
fertilizer. It is vital to the manufacture of proteins, cell 



acids, enzymes and vitamins. Responses ttf nitrogen 
application occur quickly and are easily observed. Rate 
of growth, shoot elcmgatiai, root growth, density, 
color, disease tderance, and the ability to recover 
following injurious exposure to heat, cdd, or drought 
are all. influenced by the manner in ^hich nitrc^en is 
used in the management program. 

The most impOTtant point to keep in mind is that little 
or no nitrogen should be applied to fescue during the 
spring OT summer. 

The effect of nitrogen applications on cod season 
turfgrasses is of special significance in the transition 
zone (zone 8). The climatic conditions are highly 
variable and subject to repid and extreme changes in 
temperature. Moisture varies frwn excessive to 
drought coiditions. 

Under such ccmditions, the rate and schedule of 
nitrogen application assumes major importance. By 
controlling the amount of nitrogen applied and 
selecting the time of year it is applied, you can greatly 
enhance the perfOTmance of fescue 31 in Virginia 
Beach. On the other hand, nitrogen applications made 
at the wrong time, as in spring, weaken fescue and may 



lead to severe injury and sometimes loss during the 
stress oeriods of summer. , , . 

Te toy to maintaining a decent fescue lawn m ttaj 

atpa is timing of fertUizer aPPJ>'^"«?J- ^'^LS 
pScent of the nitrogen r'^^'^^d shcmld l« appb^^ 
between September and December. During this time of 
year, shorter days and lower temperatures resultm 
excessive top growth and a drastic reduction m food 
reserves. Tlie greatest cause of poor success with 
fescue is the large amounts of fertilizer we contmue to 
needlessly dump on the lawn each spring and summer. 

Library Needs Gift Books 

Friends of the Chesapeake PubUc Library need paper- 
back and hardbound books for the Book Fair to be 
held. June 25 and 26 at the Headquarters Library on 
Cedar Road. 

Gift books may be brought to any Chesapeake Bran- 
ch Library. The proceeds from the Book Fair will be 
used to benefit aU Chesapeake libraries. 

For further information call Mrs. Ann Davis 
Kristiansen, Chairman of the Book Sale, at 545-6833. 





The Estate of Joseph E. Korleski 

Capeviile, (Eastern Shore), Virgiiiia 



10:30 A.M. 



Locntioili From Norfolk, Va. or Salisbury, Md. take U.S. Hwy. #13 to Capeviile, Va, 
#624, 5 miles north of Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel and 100 miles south of Salisbury, 



]L 



at State 
Md. 



Route 



- 1978 I 



Allis-Chalmers Gas Forklift 



International 1086 Diesel Tractor with 
Canopy & 18.4 X 38 Duals (631 Hrs.) 
- 1971 Oliver 1655 Diesel Tractor 
Oliver 1650 Diesel Tractor 
Oliver 1850 Gas Tractor 



- 1969 

- 1966 

- 1965 

- 1969 

- 1963 

- 1961 

- 1962 



Oliver 1850, Gas 
Massey-Ferguson 
Ma^sey-Ferguson 
Massey-Ferguson 
Massey-Ferguson 



Tractor 

180 Gas Tractor 
65 Gas Tractor 
50 Gas Tractor 
35 Gas Tractor 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1974 

- 1972 

- 1970 

- 1969 

- 1969 

- 1967 

- 1970 

- 1965 

- 1962 

- 1970 

- 1965 

- 1966 

- 1967 

- 1978 

- 1973 

- 1956 



lev. C-60 Truck with 
Chev. C-60 Truck with 
Chev. C-60 Truck with 
Chev. C-50 Truck with 
Chev. C-50 Truck with 
Chev. C-50 Truck with 
Chev. C-50 Truck with 
Chev. C-20 Truck with 
Chev. C-10 Pickup Truck 
Ford F-600 Truck with Bulk Potato Body 
Int. 1600 Truck with Bulk Potato Body 
C-65 Truck with Bulk Potato Body 



15' Steel Tandem Axle Trailer 
4 Row Rotary Hoe 
4 X 16" Massey-Ferguson Plow 
1,000 Gal. Steel Tank 
20' Steel Flat Truck Body 

10' X 60' Cardinal Drive-On Platform Scales, 
(100,000 Lbs.- Electronic) 

y I'i.'ftiunTferbird irrigation System wi 

5" Aluraintm Pipe 
16 000' of 4", 6", 7" & 8" Aluminum Irrigation Pipe, 
Plus L's, T's, Plugs, Couplers, Reducers^ Jitc. 
Bulk Potato Body 160 - 4" Sprinklers ^ 

14' Steel Dump Body3 - Chrysler Gas Industrial 6" X 6" Irrigation Pumps 



Lth 1,440' of 



Bulk 
Bulk 
Bulk 
Bulk 
Bulk 



Potato 
Potato 
Potato 
Potato 
Potato 



10' Service 



Body 
Body 
Body 
Body 
Body 
Body 



Bulk 
Bulk 



Potato 
Potato 



Body 
Body 



Chev, 

Chev. C-60 Truck with 
Chev. C-50 Truck with 
Chevrolet El Camino 
Chevrolet El Camino 
G.M.C. Truck with 1,000 Gal 
Steel Fertilizer Tank 

- 1966 Chevrolet Sedan Automobile 

- 1958 Chev. Truck with Short Dirt Dump 

- 1970 Hatteras 12' X 50' Mobile Home Trailer 



Stainless 



1 - 1970 Hatteras 



tato Bodies (Haines & Lockwood) 
Oliver #1810 Frontend Loader 
12' John Deere #1630 Disc Harrow 
12' John Deere Disc Harrow 
4 Row McClenney Shank Cultivator 
4 Row John Deere Shank Cultivator 

4 Itow Massey-Ferguson Rolling Cultivator 
6' Disc Harrow 

7 X 16" Semi-Mount Bottom Plow 

5 X 16" Semi-Mount Bottom Plow 
12' Oliver Disc Harrow 

4 Row Disc Bedder with Gandy Boxes 

Meyers 500 Gal. Pull-Type Sprayer w/48' Booms 

12' John Deere Grain Drill 

12' Massey-Ferguson Grain Drill 

Set of 15.5 X 38 Duals (Fits Oliver Tractors) 



2 Row Holland Transplanter 
300 Gal. Weed Sprayer 
6' Ford Rotary Mower 

1 - Air Blast Sprayer 

S^on Equipment! 5 hp 

of Marquette Acetylene Outfits ^20 
Vise-, 200 AMP. P & H AC-DC Welder 

2 - 4- Drawer Metal File Cabinets, 



Deming 4" Pump with 10 HP, Electric Motor 
Irrigation Pioe .1«Jagons 

5-4 Slow Johri Deere Totato Kanters 

1975 Lockwood Mark 6 Potato Harvester 

Middleton Parrish Potato Harvesters 

Deilts-Wetzel Seed Cutters 

McConnell Seed Unloaders 

30' Haines Flume with Hydraulic Motor & Pximp 

15' Haines Chain Elevator 

6' & 8' Haines Washer 

7' Haines Sizer 

20' J.R. Dryer with 4' Opetjing 

10' American Roller Conveyor 

5' Haines Chef Machine 

12' & 20' Haines Belt Distribution Tables 

6' American Belt Pick-Out Table 

Boggs Picking Tables & Sizers 

8' L-Belt Conveyor 

Belt Conveyors from 5' to 50' Long (Various Makes) 

American Telescoping 78' with 50' Telescope 

Bulk or Bag Conveyor 
50 Lb. Haines Roller Baggers 

Ez-Way Automatic Bagger ^ 

14 Head Weighmatic for 5 & 10 Lb. Bags 
Weighmatic 5 Lb., 10 Lb. & 50 Lb. Baggers 
Weighmatic Automatic Master Packer, 5 to 50 Lbs. 
Fischbein Model 4380 Sewing Machines (Will slide 

under L Belts) 
Fischbein Hand Sewing Machines 
Fairbanks Platform Scales 
Hand Trucks 

4,000 Lb. Barrett Electric Pallet Jack 
5 ',000 Lb. B/T Hydraulic Pallet Jack 
5' X 6' Aluminum Loading Ramp 
Portable Johns 
Wooden Pallets 



1 - 

2 - 



1 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
10 
1 



V 



l^J 



I 



5 

i 

* 

V 

i 

1 



2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 

3 
4 
9 
1 
1 
1 
3 



|Everything 



200 

100 000 Paper, Master Pack, Burlap & Other Bags 
l'- Lot of Parts, Belts, Chain, Thread, Etc. 
AND, MANY OTHER ITEMS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION 
AMS Electric Air Compressor, Small Electric Air Compressor, 2 Sets 
Ton Hydraulic Press, Air Grease Gun. 30 Gal. Transmission Gun, Shop 
Plus Shop Tools and Parts. nffi#*« Efiiiinment. Desks 
Chairs. Sofa. Gas Heater & Tl 



P",rP EoulDment: 

above sells at ABSOLUTE AUCTION!! 



Aii rTinMFFR'ft MOTE: This is some of the finest equipment that we have been commissioned to sell this 
vear Before Mr Korleski passed away, he had all of this equipment ready to work. EVERYTHING WILL 
^KTT AT Ib^SlUtI AUCTION , with the exception of the land, residence, buildings and ^"P^^^f^JIf^^s and the 
soecial vehicles listed on the back of this sheet. If you need A-1 used equipment, DON T MISS THIS 
IuCTION: See reverse side for information on sale of land, buildings, improvements, & special vehicles. 
In case of snow and ice on day of auction, sale will be held the following Wednesday April 6th, same 
tLe Open for inspection griday. April ist and mornin, before sale. Paytnent in tuli on an purchases 
must be made day of sale to Jack Peoples . Bonded_Auctioneer\_ 



TERMS: CASH OR GOOD CHECK 

JACK PEOPLES 

Bonded Auctioneer 

1340 Head of River Road 

Chesapeake, Va. 233^ 

Phone (804^ 421-2525 or 421-2360 



SALE RAIN OR SHINE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS 

— Few Additional InlormaUon Contact — 




Any Announcements W»St 

On Sa;e Oiy Tikes 
Precedence Ovtf Tins Ad. 



LUNCH AVAILABLE 
BALE AU1B0RIZBD BY: 



N.C.A.L. fiin 



LICENSED AND BONDED IN VIRGINIA & NORTH CAROUNA 



BENJ. W. HEARS, JR., Executor 
Eastville, Va. 
(804) 678-5138 



mam 



wmm 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 23, 1983 5 



/iVirsinia Beach Sun Hews 



Voice Of The People 



Should City Council Fund A New Virginia Beach Pops 
Orchestra Under The Direction Of Conductor Walter Noona? 



•Wo. / think city 
council is already 
wasting too much money 
on foolishness like art 
and orchestras. Those 
sorts of things ought to 
be self-supporting. The 
city instead should spend 
its money on things that 
really matter; like im- 
provement of roads, in- 
creased pay for cops and 
teachers, and erosion 
control at the beach. 
Virginia Beach Pops... 
who needs them?" 

Mabelle McRory 
Seven-Eleven clerk 
three-year resident 




"No. It would be un- 
fair for council to go 
through all that trouble 
for the benefit of one 
man. Why should they? 
Th« city was already 
committed to funding 
that other group, so it 
should do so with or 
without the conductor, I 
don't agree with the 
idea, and I think it could 
set a precedent. 

MikeO'Brieni 
aircraft mechanic 
IVz -year resident 




•7 think Walter 
Noona has been done a 
great disservice by the 
people who fired him. 
He has done much for 
this region, it's a shame 
for him to now be 
without an orchestra to 
conduct. I think Virginia 
Beach would be foolish 
not to help him launch a 
new group. " 

Lynn Mergatroid 

Cab driver 

Four-year resident 




McRory 



O'Brien 



Mergatroid 



"No. Our city council 
is charged with the 
responsibility of making 
judgements and 

decisions based on those 
judgements for the good 
of all Virginia Beach 
citizens. If they were to 
go through with this, 
they'd be opening a 
Pandora's box. 

This,, city is too 
large to allow per- 
sonalities to conflict with 
decision-making. " 

Lillian Jessie 

Sales Associate 

21 -year resident 




Jessie 



DON'T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY! 



FARM FOR SALE 






ft PoHOj 



EQUIPMENT ATiPTTAM njjj. 






9 /CMKMtai 



■MP 1 



p o 



N O 



mi 



-a*oo 



fT. 



PL<kT or A CeHTAIH P909%M.-n 
IN TMt ISTATC OF 

JOStPH L KORLESKl 

HIAR 

CAPEVl LLE 
MtfefAiite na. mt r j*w t. cMtaot. 



TMI* W^t MM •»»» MIMKIO r«0» IMPO«PlATIO« 
(MBAMtfO f«On taVCMi. M,«1» IU«D ACRIAL *M«Te«RAWH>. 
A »U«V«X WAt SNOW VAUIAYIOH «H »OWt OIM»»«t«»H» 
AMP AMA» ►»©« 1»»0«« UtOWN MtMOn. ro» TM » « 

UtAtON, ■«• OIMH«»WH« AM OKUf AFFKO»»MAt». 






^»* 



<«o 



C3t3i! 



'M£attsatti£a-i& 



lOU 



•«»i 



•^ 



HO, 



ft** 



>2. 



«ii« 



This plat has been prepared for information only and does not necessarily represent the actual dimen- 
sions of the property. 

This property can be sold by contacting either Jack Peoples, Auctioneer or Ben j . W. Hears, Jr., Execu- 
tor of the Estate of Joseph E. Korleski. If this property and improvements has not been sold prior to 
day of Farm Equipment Auction, it will be offered at PUBLIC AUCTION Saturday, April 2, 1983, at 
12:00 Noon. * 

A 10% deposit by the accepted bidder will be required by cash or bank cashiers check or certified 
check, mkde p ayable to Ben.1 . W. Hears. Jr. . Executor of the Estate of Joseph E. Korleski, at conclusion 
of bidding, with settlement to take place within 30 days toiiowing the auction. Uwner reserves the , 
right to reject any and all bids. 

Thia would be an ideal setup for a produce packer or any other business that needs a hub of operation 
>r ior someone looking for a great investment opportunity. 




■<;PFr.!AI VEHICLES FOR SALE PRIOR TO AUCTION: * ^-* 



1983 flERCEDES-BENZ 300TD Diesel Station Wagon 
1983 Chevrolet El Camino 




If these special vehicles do not sell prior to auction, they 
also will be offered immediately following the sale of land, 
buildings and improvements. The owner reserves the right to 
reject any and all bids on these special vehicles only. 






^ 



ATTENTION BUYERS; 

The only things that can be sold prior to auction are the land, buildings and improvements. AND 

special vehicles. 

Everything on reverse side of sheet will be sold at ABSOLUTE AUCTION. 



— FOR INFORIiATION CONTACT — 



JACK PEOPLES 

Bonded Auctioneer 
1340 Head of River Road 
Chesapeake, Va. 23322 
(804) 421-2525 



/^^JiSSS^ 



OnSAtayTttes 



PrraUtnt Elect 





BENJ. W. MEARS. Executor 
OF Estate of Joseph E, Korleski 

Eastville, Va. 23347 
(804) 678-5138 



N.C.A.L. flSl? 



) 



Student Creative Corner 



These works were submitted by second 
teacher Mrs. Linda Peerless, Malibu Elementary 
School. 



The Snow 



The snow is nice. The snow is white. There is 
alot of snow tonight. And in the morning 1 will 
run to have some fun. .,««««„_-»r 

By Mill Smith, 7, son of 
« Mr. and Mn. Paul Smith 



Winter Waiting 

Winter winter winter where are you? 1 have' 
nothing to do. I've been waiting all fall for you. I 
wish it would snow and make it come true. 

By Jenica Lynn Wysocki, I, 

daugliter of Mr. and Mn. 

Francis Wysocltl 



I Love Snow 



Winter is neat. 1 play in the snow. I get cold 
feet. And 1 hear the wind blow. It is fun. When 
there is a sun. 

By Carol York. 7, 

daughter of Mr. and 

Mrs. Robert Voric 



Winter Fun 



The snowman was fat and tall. If the snow 
comes out, he will be small. The kids have fun 
throwing snowballs. But skating oh the ice, they 
will fall. 

By Mark Bishop, 7, son of 
Mr. and Mn. Walter Btohop 



Snow 

I like the snow. You can hear the wind blow. 
The snow is so white. It's a beautiful sight. There 
is no sun, but you can still have fun in the snow. . 

By Chuck Johnton, 7, son of 
Mr. Charles Johnson 

Winter 

We can have snowball fights in the snow. But 
then I get cold from my head to my toe. In the 
winter the wind blows strong. And the nights get 
long. 

By Mmberly Stone, 7, daughter 
of Mr. and Mn. Thomas Stone 



Snowflakes 



Snow flakes are falling all around. When I see 
them I am happy. Softly they fall to the ground. 
They don't make a sound. 

B> Shelli Finkbeiner, 7, 
son of Mr. and Mn. Gary Finkbeiner 



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6 Virginia Beach Sun, March 23, 1983 



Virginia Beach Sun>lews 



> 



Tartners' Assist Girls' Return To 'Outside World' 



I 



Continued from Page I 

potential for setbacks and 
failure. 

"A lot is required of the 
volunteers, and they get 
nothing in terms of finan- 
cial compensation in 
return," said Woolf. 
"Those ladies are reaUy 
the key to the whole 
thing." 

Although it is to early to 
fully evaluate the effec- 
tiveness of Partners in Af- 
tercare, Woolf said there 
are indications the 
program is working. 
Evidence can be found, 
she said, by evaluating 
girls who have been 
released since the advent 
of the program, and who 
are adapting to life on the 
outside. 

A 17 year-old from the 
Hilltop area, whose name 
nas been withheld at the 



court's request, said her 
life has turned around 
because of the 1 1 months 
she spent at Bon Air. 
Much of the change, she 
said, can be attrib)]ted to 
the support she received 
through the Partners in 
Aftercare program. 

"Before I went to Bon 
Air, I had a terrible at- 
titude," she said. "I wan- 
ted to do wha,t I wanted to 
do. I had no respect for 
anybody, not even for 
myself." 

The girl explained that 
she was lashing out 
because of feelings she 
harbored over the death of 
her father when she was 
10 years-old. "1 felt deser- 
ted and rejected, and 1 
didn't want to deal with 
him dying," she said. "I 
felt cheated and deprived, 
and so I rebelled against 
everything." 




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She said she got into the 
wrong crowd, skipped* 
school, and drank alcohol 
to excess. After three 
years of this sort of 
behavior, she was commit- 
ted to Bon Air. 

"When 1 first got there, 
I got into lots of trouble," 
she said. "I got into a 
fight with another girl and 
was charged with assault. 
Then, I got caught with a 
lighter and got charged 
with possessing con- 
traband. I kept getting in 
trouble and there was no 
end in sight." 

During her last two 
months at the facility, the 
girl was paired up with a 
partner. That is when her 
fortunes changed. 

"1 finally realized that I 
have to make something 
of myself," she said. "I 
realized that there is more 
to life than running in the 
streets. I wanted to go 
home and be with my 
family. 

"Part of my problem, I 
found, was that I had 
never been able to express 
my feelings," she said. "I 
learned that the best thing 
to do is to let your feelings 
out instead of holding 
them back." 



The girl was "reluc- 
tant," she said, when the 
Partners in Aftercare 
program first began. "I 
thought to myself, 'here I 
am, just a teenager, and 
they are sticking me with 
this adult; I can't talk to 
her,'" she remembered. 
"But I gave it a chance, 
and my partner was really 



my life a whole lot 
easier," the girl noted. 
Today, the girl is finishing 
her high school equivUan- 
cey tests. "My life is really 
turning around," she said. 

Woolf said that the suc- 
cess of the ^Is program 
may lead to a similar 
program for boys. 

Such success stories are 



"The role of the court is to serve the 
community. We can best serve the 
community by turning these children in- 
to productive citizens. The Partners in 
Aftercare program helps get these girls 
back into the mainstream. Also, if the 
program is successful it will reduce our 
case load, which is also good for the 
community. " - The Honorable 
Frederick P. Aucamp, judge, Juvenile 
and Domestic Relations District Court. 



nice. She is a true friend." 
Since her release in 
January, the girl and her 
partner have gone to 
movies and gone shopping 
together, and they 
regularly talk on the 
telephone. "She has made 



pleasing to the court's 
judges. "One of our main 
goals is to see that oncx we 
commit someone to the 
state correctional facility, 
that we don't ever see 
them in the courtroom 
again," said Judge 



Fraderick P. Aucamp of 

the Juvenile and Domestic 
Relations District Court. 
"This program will help 
immensely toward that 
end.. 

"The role of the court is 
to serve the community," 
continued Aucamp. "We 
can best serve the com- 
munity by turning these 
children into productive 
citizens. The Partners in 
Aftercare progrm helps 
get these girls back into 
the mainstream. Also, if 
the program is successful 
it will reduce our caseload, 
which is also good for the 
community." 

Judge John K. Moore. 
also from the Juvenile and 
Domestic Relations District 
Court, said the pioptsa 
"has the potential to be 
one of the very best we 
have ever come up with in 
the courts. 

"The partners program 
provides a strong connec- 
tive link to the community 
for the girls with 
somebody else besides 
their family," he said. 
"This gives that child a 
friend, somebody she can 
confide in and trust." 

Moore praised the ef- 
forts of the volunteers ih- 
volved in the program. 



"We don't have the suff 
for this," he said. "In 
fact, without volunteers, 
we couldn't even function. 
The job the volunteers do 
is very symptomatic of the 
spirit of this community. 
We are indeed very lucky 
to be blessed with thoe 
kind of people." 

"It's a fantastic 
program; one of the most 
worthwhile I've ever seen 
in my 23 years in this line 
of work," said Kathleen 
Ules, superlBteBdent of 
the Bob Air Learning Cen- 
ter. "It is one of the most 
innovative ideas I have 
ever seen. 

"I wish every court in 
the state had a marvelous 
program like this," Liles 
continued. "One of our 
big problems here at Bon 
Air is that our girls have a 
real low self concept. 
When the volunteers from 
Virginia Beach come all 
the way up here to Rich- 
mond just to see the girls, 
it makes them feel impor- 
tant. Everybody needs to 
know somebody cares 
about them. Plus, this 
gives them a friend when 
they get back." 

Re-entry into the out- 
side world is often a dif- 
ficult process, according 




Woolf 

to Lite. "The girls leave 
here, with all the structure 
and regimentation and 
dependence, and when 
they get out it is 
sometimes a shock," she 
said. "They need a 
weaning process because 
their first few weeks and 
months put of the learning 
center are a very impor- 
tant time in their lives. A 
normal adjustment is 
essential, and this 
program really helps that 
process along." 

Liles hailed the Virginia 
Beach courts as befng 
"very progressive and 
caring" for instituting the 
Partners in Aftercare 
program, the program's 
volunteers, said Liles, 
"are going straight to 
Heaven. 1 can't say 
enough about them. They 
are truly wonderful in- 
dividuals, " she added. 



Rogers Wins History Essay Contest 



By Jackie Matthews, 

Sun Correspondent 

Kim Rogers, daughter 
of Cdr. and Mrs. Michael 
W. Rogers of Kings Forest 
Virginia Beach, has won 
the District 1 Champion- 
ship Award in the annual 
American History Month 
essay contest. 

The contest was spon- 
sored by the Nationaf 



Society of the Daughters 
of the American 
Revolution. Its purpose is 
to spark more interest 
among the young in 
American History. Mrs. 
Jo Anne French, Kim's 
sixth grade English 
teacher at Malibu Elemen- 
tary, required each of her 
students to write an essay 
and then selected the mdst 



outstanding and entered 
them in the contest. Mrs. 
French said, "the students 
had to list at least six 
research books where they 
obtained their infor- 
mation." Some of the 
topics of the essays in- 
cluded, education, 
clothing, housing, fur- 
niture, occupation, 
, weapons, tools, and 




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depression are difflcult to handle alone. 
Professional counseling for these stress- 
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recreation. Kim's essay 
was School Books in 
Colonial Times. 

"I was very surprised 
and excited, this was the 
first contest that I have 
ever won," I^ said. Her 
essay has been entered in 
the state competition. She 
received a medal and cer- 
tificate from the three 
Virginia Beach chaplers of 
the DAR. 

The DAR also presen- 
ted metals to outstanding 
students of American 
History in the city's high 
schools: Kenny Tennyson, 
Princess Anne; Eric Nor- 
flMt, Bayslde; Chris 
O'NeOI, Cox; Julie Bright, 
Kellam; Michael Davis, 
First Colonial; Craig 
Hudson, Kempsville; and 
Janet Pascua, Green Run. 




Rogers and teacher Jo Anne French 



Referendum Proceedure Discussed 



Hiere's "no formal 
procedure" on the 
method by which a citi- 
zen may circulate peti- 
tions calling fw a refer- 
endum to be placed in 
the I^v. 8 general elec- 
tion ballot, said Virginia 
Beach Delegate Glenn 
B. McQanan. 

McQanan said that 
most likely, a citizen 



would go to "the attor- 
ney of your choice" to 
make sure the language 
on the petitions is 
worded properly to 
appear as a referendum. 
Before a referendum 
is placed on a baUot, 
petitions reflecting the 
exact wording of the 
question must carry 
encwgh names, in num- 



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2SVt of the residents 
voting in the city's last 
election. 

Vivian Hitchcock, a 
civic activist, is circulat- 
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question, "...shall mem- 
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selected by the popular 
election of the qualified 
voters?" 

She needs 15,220 
names on the petiticms 
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Virginia Beach Sun, March 23, 1983 7 



Virsinia Beach Sports 



BeachersFare 'Very Well' 



1983 Shamrock Draws 1,900 Runners 









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By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

The seventh annual Vir- 
ginia Beach Shamrock 
Marathon, a 26-nule, 385- 
yard race, has been won 
by Nick Manchu, a 24 
year-old Romanian 
immigrant participating in 
his first American mara- 
thon. 

Manchu defeated a field 
of more than 1,900 run- 
ners, completing the 
course in two hours, 19 
minutes and 32 seconds, 
nearly eight minutes and 
one and one-half miles 
ahead of runner-up Tom 
Stevens of Middletown, 
Md. The winning time is 
the third fastest in the 
Shamrock's history. The 
record of 2:16:57 was set 
by Terry Baker in 1981. 

The first woman to fin- 
ish was Juanita Ethe- 
ridge, a 31 year-old 
Norfolk schoolteacher. 
Etheridge, who placed 
36th overall, recorded a 
time of two hours, 51 
minutes and 51 seconds; 
12 minutes and 10 
seconds ahead of 
women's runner-up 
Deborah Beckner of Nor- 
fdk. For Etheridge, the 
1983 Shamrock was her 
second virtory in the 
event. In 1981 she won the 
race in two hours, 44 
minutes and eight 
seconds. 

Of the 1,900 runners 
who started the race, 
nearly 1,200 finished. An 
estimated crowd of 
between 2,d00 and 4,000 
was on hand near the 
finish line on Atlantic 
Avenue near 8th Street. 

Virginia Beach nmners 
fared "very well," 
according to , David 




2:35:17. Coining in 11th 
place was Alax Pincu of 
Virginia Beach in two 
hours, 38 minutes and 18 
seconds. Richard Short of 
Virginia Beach, with a 
time of 2:39:51, finished 
in 15th place. 

Griffin Rogers of \fir- 
ginia Beach won the 
men's 23-29 division, with 
a time of 2:48:32. 

. Wayne Wilson of Vir- 
ginia Beach finished fifth 
in the men's 35-39 cate- 
gory, with a time -of 
2:58:46. 

In the men's 40-44 divi- 
sion, Virginia Beach's 
Tom Siggins came in 



Winner Manchu of 
Romania completed the 
Shamrock in the Ihrid 
fastest time ever in the 
seven-year hbtory of the 
race. 



McDonald's president of 
the event's co-sponsor. 
The Tidewater Striders. 
McDonald, an investiga- 
tor with the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach Consumer 
Protection Division, won 
the Shamrock five -mile 
run with a time of 24 
minutes and two seccMids. 
tfe did not participate in 
the marathon because he 
is in training few next 
moith's B(Mton Mara- 
thon, he said. , 

Rich Thompson of Vir- 
ginia Beach finished third 
overall in the marathon, 
with a time of 2:28:19. In 
fifth place was Virginia 
Beach's William Bernard, 
who crossed the finish line 

in two hours, 32 minutes 
and 31 seconds. Rod Har- 
vey of Virginia Beach was 
in ninth place, with a time 




VirfialTBcKh's Freda 
Tcnnant won the womca's 
30-34 division with a time 
of 3:21:27 



second place, with a time 
of 2:45:23. 

Winning the men's 
45-49 division was Mel 
Williams of Virginia 
Beach, who recorded a 
time of 2:47: 10. 

Freda Tenant of Vir- 
ginia Beach wop the 
women's 30-34 division 
with a time ot 3 21:27. 

Fran Adams of Virginia 
Beach won the women's 
50-and-over division with 
a time of 3:33:54. 

The Shamrock two- 
miler was dominated by 
Virginia Beach runners, 
who captured three of the 
top-five slots. In second 
was Rodney Rogers, with 
a time of 11:49; in third 
was Al Cartwell, with a 
time of 12:03; and in 
fourth was Brian Wake- 
field with a time of 12:13. 
Shirley Cardwell of Vir- 
ginia Beach was the 
women's runner-up in the 
event, finishing in 15 
minutes and 29 seconds. 

The race began at 10 
a.m. at 8th Street and 
Atlantic Avenue. Runners 
headed up Atlantic 
Avenue, into Seashore 
State Park. TTiey came 
back down Shwe Drive, 
through Fort Story and 
proceeded on the Board- 
walk. At 7th Street, the 
course veered through 
Rudee Inlet, down Gen- 
eral Booth Boulevard, 
past Camp Pendleton and 
into Red Wing Park. The 
course then swung back 
toward the finish line at 
8th Street. 

"It was a great field 
and great day," said 
McDonald. "It was a little 
hot^ which may have 
caiised some of the slow 
times, but it was good 
weather as far as drawing 
spectatcws." 




.To cheer on the vktorlous Manchu. 




For oUwrs, it was the agony of defeat. 



I 



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Beach Native Gatlin 
Snares MVP Honors 



Virginia Beach native 
Jimi Gatlin was the cata- 
lyst recently as South 
Carolina State College 
captured the Mid-Eastern 
Athletic Conference 

women's tournament at 
the Oeensboro Coliseum. 

Galin averaged 22 
pdnts and 10.7 rebounds 
in the three games to earn 
Most Valuable Player 
honors. She joined team- 
mate Vonda Middletcm on 
the All-Tournament team. 
In the championship 
game, in which S.C. State 
defeated Bethune-Codc- 
man 65-64, he farmer 
First Colo ' prei»ter 



had 22 p^nts and 12 
rebounds. Gatlin's three- 
point play with two 
minutes to play staked the 
Lady Bulldogs to a 63-62 
lead. Denise Johnson 
added a 12-foot jumper 
with 1 : 1 1 to play to ensure 
the win. 

Galin had 24 paints and 
eight rebounds against 
Maryland-Eastern Shore 
in the tourney opener 
which S.C. State won 
69-54 and contributed 22 
poinu and 12 rebounds in 
a 63-61 win over Florida 
AAM in the semifinals, 
despite missing most of 
tlw first half with a kne 
injury. 



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Sargent 

Wins 
1983 Title 



Carol Sargent of Vir^iUa Beach won tte 19S3 
Ms. Vir^Bia Beach BodylMdIdiag CbampioosMp 
Saturday, March 12 at tlie Deep Cmk High 
School. She was chosca out of 17 woflMB from 
around the stale. Vaugh Jipacr from FarmvWc 
woa the Mr. Virginia Beach tftfc while Grant 
QntiUe of Norfolk won the TeeM^c Title. A totiri 
of 4S coalcstaito compeiMl fw tUs years title. 



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Fund Started 

Friends of Bubba 
Nissen. the Virginia Beach 
stock car driver who was 
tedly injured in a recent 
crash at Rockingham, 
N.C.. have starMi a fuml 
to help get the young 
driver back on his feet. 

Contributions from 
friends aiui fans may be 
sent in care of the 
Newtown Road branch of 
Citizens Trust Bank, ac- 
cording to Kitty Falk ami 
Gail Drummond, who 
speartead the voluntary 
effort. 




mmm. 



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8 Virginia Beach Sun, March 23, 1983 



Yirginia Beach City Council ByLMCahui 



] 



Beach Council Actions 




Joha A. Baiiiii 
Mack water 



Ntacy A. Creech 
At-Largc 



Barbara M. Healcy 
Pungo 



Harold Heischobcr 
Al-Largc 



H. Jack Jennings 
Lynnhaven 



Loub R. Jones 
Baysidc 






Robert G. Jones 
Ai-Largc 



W. H. Kltchin, III 
Virginia Beach 



Reba S. McClanan 
Princess Anne 



J. Henry McCoy, Jr. 
Kempsvlile 



Meyera Obemdorf 
Al-Large 



Meeting Date: Monday, March 21, 1983, All Members Present 

Executive Session 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 



* Informal Session 

PlaiHiIng 



Council discussed voting on non-controversial planmng.s 
items with one vote. Councilwoman Barbara Henley wanted 
the items to be voted on individually. Council by consensus 
agreed to have a consent agenda of planning items. 



Councilman Jack Jennings Jr. suggested staff study a third 
proposal for the North Virginia Beach drainage. This would 
entail acquiring permission from the Army to allow the Beach 
to pump water to an outfall on the seldom used beach at Fort 
Story. 

OiMTotlng Budget 

City Manager Thomas H. Muehlenbeck presented the 
schedule of meetings on the proposed 1983-84 Operating 
Budget. 



Councilwoman Nancy Creech, who with Councilwoman 
Reba McClanan are on a Council subcommittee on the 
Museum of Marine Science, discussed a schedule for the con- 
struction of the museum. 

if Formal Session 

Proclainafloii 

. Mayor Louis R. Jones issued^a proclamation declaring Mar- 
ch 20 to 26 to be Virginia Beach Agriculture Week. 

Llf«fpiiard PrancMi^s 

Franchise for beach equipment/lifeguard franchise for the 
north end of the beach awarded to Ocean Rescue Service. Ap- 
proved 9-1 with McCoy dissenting. Councilman W. H. Kitchin 
III abstaining. 

Franchise for beach equipment/lifeguard franchise for the 
south end of the beach awarded to Virginia Beach Patrol. Ap- 
proved 8-2 with Councilwoman Barbara Henley and Coun- 
cilman Jack Jennings dissenting and Kitchin abstaining. 

* Consent Agenda 

•Resolutions approving Industrial Development Revenue 
Bonds: Approved 10-0. Councilwoman Reba McClanan 
dissenting. 

•Resolution of City Council approving the issuance of In- 
dustrial Development Revenue Bond to Schell Family Partner- 
ship Facility ($600,000). 

•Resolution approving the issuance of Industrial Develop- 
ment Revenue Bonds for Donald B. Norris and Nellie M. 
Norris ($304,000). 

•Resolution approving the issuance of Industrial Develop- 
ment Revenue Bonds for La Quinta Motor Inns, Inc. 
($4,500,000). 

•Resolution of City Council approving the issuance of In- 
dustrial Development Revenue Bond to Beverly Enterprises 
($8,000,000). 

•Resolution approving the issuance of Industrial Develo^p- 
nient Revenue Bonds for Birdneck Office Condominium 
Associates ($3,0 00,000). 

•Resolution to City Council approving the issuance of In- 
dustrial Development Revenue Bond for Bayville Farms 
Associates ($200,300). 



•Resolution approving the issuance of Industrial Develop- 
ment Revenue Bonds for Ludwig Sternlicht ($800,000). 

•Resolution approving the issuance of Industrail Develop- 
ment Revenue Bonds for Bay Properties ($300,000). 
""^•Resolution approving the plan of financing and issuance of 
Industrial Development Revenue Bonds for Air Rail Properties 
($50,000). 

•Resolution approving the plan of financing of B & W 
($1,000,000). 

•Resolution of City Council approving the issuance of In- 
dustrial Development Revenue Bonds to Shore Drive 
Associates Facility ($990,000). 

•Resolution approving the issuance of Industrial Develop- 
ment Revenue Bonds for Robert W. Waddell ($2,000,000). 

OrdinaiM^t 

•Ordinance to amend and reordain Sections 1 1-1, 11-2 and 
1 1-9 of the Code of the City of Virginia Beach pertaining to the 
Farmer's Market. (This matter was deferred on March 7, 1983 
to March 21, 1983 and revised.) Approved 10-0. McClanan 
dissenting. 

•Ordinance to amend and reordain Section 35-6(A) of the 
Code of the City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, pertaining to 
penalty and interest when personal property taxes not paid on 
time; and, an Ordinance to amend and reordain Section 35-37 
of the Code of the City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, pertaining 
to penalty and interest when installment not paid on time. Ap- 
proved 10-0. McCoy absent. 

•Ordinance to amend and reordain Section 6- II 6(a) (3) of 
the Code of the City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, pertaim'ng to 
surfing generally. Approved 10^. McCoy absent. 

•Ordinance, on first reading, to appropriate funds of 
$331,100 for police and fire vehicles and reduce the 1983-84 
budget request for those vehicles by $461,112. Approved 10-0. 
McCoy absent. 

•Ordinance authorizing and directing the City Manager to 
designate certain areas of City-owned property on which air- 
craft may be landed. Approved 10-0. McCoy absent. 

Binge/Raff !• Permlft 

Kempsville Meadows Elementary PTA, raffle; Sleepy 
Hollow Hunt Club, raffle; Green Run Homes Association, 
bingo; Virginia Beach Stars Softball, raffle; The Virginia 
Beach Arts Center, raffle; and Norfolk FOP Lodge, 
bingo/raffle. Approved 10-0. McCoy absent. 



ir Planning Items 



' •Ordinance closing, vacating and discontinuing a portion of 
l.ynn Shores Drive in the petition of Thomas G. and Irina C. 
Harty and Thomas M. and Rita K. Vojtek (Bayside Borough). 
Letter from the City Manager transmits the recommendation 
of the Planning Commission, and the viewers concur, for ap- 
proval. Approved 10-0. Creech absent. 

•Application of Lillian B. Johnson for a variance to Section 
4.4(d) of the Subdivision Ordinance which requires that all lots 
created in a subdivision have access to a public street. She 
wishes to subdivide a 1 .944-acre undeveloped parcel into two 
lots, each .972 acre in size. Letter from the City Manager tran- 
smits the recommendation of the Planning Commission for 
approval. Approved 9-0. L. Jones, Creech absent. 

•Application of Allen J. Getiel, Parliament Building and 
Roger W. Gray for a change of zoning from B-2 Community- 
Business District to 1-1 Light Industrial District on a 3.913-acre 
parcel located along the northeast intersection of Parliament 

SeeCOUNClL,Pagel2 



Info 
Sought 



r 



The Virginia Beach 
Crime Solvers Program is 
seelcing information about 
the May 25, 1975 murder 
of Deborah K. Mclnnis. 

On that Sunday night 
Mrs. Mclnnis, a 22 year- 
old, was worl(ing as an 
assistant manager for the 
Kentuclcy Fried Chicken 
restaurant at 6544 Indian 
River Road. Her husband 
had planned to meet his 
wife at 9 p.m. but lost 
track of time. At about 10 
p.m. he called the restau- 
rant but there was no an- 
swer. He then went to the 
Kentucky Fried Chicken 
where he found his wife 
near death on the kitchen 
floor. 

The Crime Solvers ask 
that anyone with infor- 
mation about this murder 
call 427-0000 and Crime 
Solvers will pay $1,000 in 
cash if an arrest is made. 
Kentucky Fried Chicken is 
^so offering an additional 
$10,000 reward for infor- 
mation that leads to the 
solution of this crime. 



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Mail to: 

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Thalia Library Site Chosen 



Continued from Page 1 
ginia Beach Boulevard, as 
opposed to the TCC site. 
He said the re pOTt could 
be cmstrued as "self- 
serving" and Jennings 
criticized the use of 
"unnamed sources." 

He interpreted the 
report as coicluding that 
$2 million could be saved 
by using the TCC site, 
while the report went (mi 
to defend the Thalia site. 
He moved that work be 
stqjped (HI the Thalia site 
and that a "first class, 
blue chip" citizens can- 
mittee be appointed by 
Council to determine the 
best and most cost effec- 
tive location for the cen- 
tral library. 

Councilwoman Reba 
McQanan sec(xided his 
moti(»i which subsequent- 
ly lost by the 9-2 vote with 
only Jennings and 
McQanan voting in favcff. 

McOanan said that a 
study should be made of 
the entire capital develop- 
ment plan of the libraries 
in view of other pressing 
financial privities in the 
city. 

Council apparently was 
concerned with the possi- 



bility of having to ask fcv 
an increase m the real 
estate tax in the upcoming 
operating budget which 
will be presented by Qty 
Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck next Mon- 
day. 

Councilman Jdin A. 
Baum said he was not 
against blue chips, but 
questitmed the timing. He, 
said Council had "been 
through this" and that it 
was a little late to come up 
with another site. The site 
has been purchased by 
the city for $420,000 and 
Muehlenbeck said he was 
ready to employ an archi- 
tect the design the build- 
ing. 

Baum added that the 
TCC site was not central 
enough for the central 
library and that once the 
city has started proceed- 
ings, it would be wasteful 
of tax dollars to change 
course. He said he knew 
Jennings was sincere, but 
he agreed "with what 
we've done." 

Councilman Harold 
Heischober said he had no 
problem with a commit- 
tee, but wanted to know 
what a delay might mean 



to the effOTt. Jennings had 
suggested the committee 
be made up of retired 
military leaders ^^ retired 
business leaders, active 
business and industrial 
leaders, users of the 
library and other tax- 
payers. 

Board Chairman Jack 
Robertscm said that a 
delay wcwid place the city 
in a position of having to 
pay more for the construc- 
tioa. 

Muehlenbeck said that 
was a worthy point. He 
added that he was about 
to sign a contract with an 
architect and if there were 
to be further delays he did 
not want to string an 
architect alcNig. 

Robertson said that the 
staff has been studying 
libraries to best meet the 



needs and interests of the 
people. He said that three 
or four years ago, the 
concept changed to work- 
ing toward two area libra- 
ries (as opposed to neigh- 
borhood libraries) and the 
central library. He said 
that most branch libraries 
in the city are in 5,500 
square-foot buildings, but 
that it is more economical 
to buUd 20,000 square- 
foot area libraries. 

He said the Board has 
been studying the city's 
needs for 2.5 years. He 
said the sites considered 
on Virginia Beach Boule- 
vard were controversial. 
He said that the TCC site 
is not centrally located 
and "we did not justify 
our point in spite of 
everything. We have^ 
taken it lightly. Mentbers 

See COUNCIL, Page 10 



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Political Candidates' Biogr 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 23, 1983 9 




Continued from Page I 

District co-chairman, Ford-Dole ticket. 

Canada's honors include, "Outstanding Young 
Men of America; "IHstinguished LcgislatOTs of 
America," 1973 edition; named "Outstanding 
Young Man of Virginia Beach" in 1974 by the 
Vtfginia Beach Jaycees. 

Canada's standing conmittee assignments 
include. Courts of Justia; Educaticm and Health; 
Local Government; and Rehabilitation and Social 
Services. ' 

Subcommittee assigmnents: kindergarten pro- 
grams; pdice powe^; bad check laws; and 
regulation of sale of alcohdic beverages. Study 
commissions: No-fdk- Virginia Beach Express- 
way; and Coastal ErosicMi Abatement. Other 
canmissions and committees: National Confer- 
ence of State Legislators Committee on Natural 
RescMirces. 

Harold Heischober, 4031 N. Witchduck Road. 
Owner of Pembroke Ojrysler, Plymouth, Mazda. 
Born Off March 20, 1920 in New York Qty. Wife's 
name Alice. They have three children. 

Heischober was sworn into city council offifx 
July 7, 1980. His present term is from July 1, 1980 
to June 30, 1984. He served as vice -mayor frcwn 
July 1, 1980 to June 30. 1982. 

I^ischc^r was educated at St. Jdin's Univer- 
sity Schod of Ccmimerce, and School of Law, 
Jamaica, N.Y. 

His affiliations include the Oiesapeake Athletic 
Qub, past president; Tidewater Professional 
Sports, directa; Tidewater Automobile Dealers 
>^sociation, past president; Virginia Automobile 
I>ealers Association, past president and directw; 
Disabled American Veterans, Virginia Beach 
Chapter 20; U.S. Ariny retired reservist, 
captain; ^^ginia Motor Vehicle Dealer Adviswy 
Board, Governo-'s appdntment; and National 
AssociaticMi of Professional Baseball Leagues. 

Dr. Oartnce A. HoOand, 4328 Sandy Bay 



Drive. Occupation: practices general medicine in 
Virginia Beach. Bwn on June 21, 1929 in 
Windsor, Va. His wife's name is Mary and they 
have three children. 

Holland graduated from Hampden-Sydney 
Cdlege; received his medical degree frwn the 
Medical Cdlege of Virginia. He served in the 
Navy from 1953 to *57. 

Holland was first sworn in as a Virginia Beach 
aty douncil member on Sept. 8, 1970. He served 
until June 30, 1982. He was mayor from July 1, 
1976 to June 30, 1978. 

His affiliaticms include, Bayside Presbyterian 
Qiurch, member; Bayside lion's Qub, past 
member; Tidewater Cwnmunity College, past 
trustee; adviswy board of the State Division of 
Motor Vehicles, past member; Eastern Virginia 
Health Service Agency, past member; board of 
directors, First and Merchants Bank of Tidewater, 
member; Virginia Beach Medical Society, past 
president; Virginia Academy of Family Practices, 



member; Tidewater Virginia Development Coun- 
cil Executive Committee, member; Hampton 
Roads Area Committee, member; United States 
Conference of Mayors, member; NatiMial League 
of Qties Energy and Environmental Committee, 
member; Mayw's Committee on Aging; Mayor's 
Committee on Handicapped; Mayor's Youth 
Council; Sister Cities InternaticMial; Virginia 
Medical Emergency System, past member; and 
board of trustees, Bayside Hospital. 

Robert C. Jones, 1361 Stephens Road. Jones, 
an attorney, was born on March 25, 1936 in State 
Cidlege, Pa. His wife's name is Cardyn. They 
have two children. 

Jones received his educaticm at Davidson 
Cdlege, Davidson, N.C., A.B.; Yale University, 
New Haven, Qmn., M.A.; Duke University, . 
Durham, N.C., Ph.D.; University of Virginia, 
Qiarlrttesville, Va., J.S. 

Jones was sworn into the Virginia Beach Qty 
Council on July 1, 1982. His term expires m June 
30, 1986. 



(( 



No Preference" - Holland 



Continued from Page 1 

the 50% portion of the population in the Democratic 
party since 1970. We have had Democrats who have 
represented little pieces of it." 

Hdland does not expect any opposition from within 
his party. He will cwnpete in the Nov. 8 general 
election against either Harold Heischobe/ or Meyera 
- Oberndwf, both at-large Republican members of the 
Virginia Beach Qty Council. They will compete for the 
Republican nomination at a June 1 1 ccmvention. 

Holland said whatever Republican candidate is 
selecKdi it will have no bearing on his campaign. 

"I have no preference," Holland said. "I think 
ycHi're talking about two different candidates. You have 
one candidate who has a fairly high name identification. 
You have another candidate who has shown some 
ability in his short time to work with people at maybe a 



little better level than the other one. Well, I've got 
hopefully some name identification and a whole lot of 
ability shown to work with people. 

"1 don't think there's a candidate that's easy to beat. 
I've never taken any candidate that I've run against in 
city council races lightly in any manner. 1 dcMi't intend 
to now. I intend to run a true, hard campaign." 

Holland said his 12 years on council would help him 
in Richmond toward the realization oU»>s legislative 
goals. 

"1 would prOTiote and work towards as much 
enomony and efficiency in state government as 
possible," he said, "and to do my best to get state 
government more responsive to local government 
needs. And that's where my 12 years on city c(Hincil 
would be very valuable." 



Meytra E. Obtmdorf, 5404 Challedon Drive, 
was bwn cm Feb. 10, 1941 in Newport News, Va. 
Her husband's name is Roger and they have two 
children. 

C^emdorf was first sworn into dlice on July 1. 
197d She hdds a B.S. degree in Elementary 
Education from Old Dominion University. 

Her afnUations include, American Association 
of University Women; Princess Anne WoHien's 
Qub; Arthritis Foundation of >^rginia, board of 
directors/secretary; Virginia Beach Public Library 
Board, former chairman; Trustee's Sect. Va. 
Library Association, former channan; Big Bro- 
thers & Big Sisters (tf Tidewater, board of 
directors; Cardanne Farm Gvic League, past 
president; Southeastern Regional Planning 
EMstrict, Commission, chairman - member of the 
Executive Committee; Sute Grime Commission 
Advisory Task Force On Q-iminal Sexual Assault, 
member; Oganization for Rehabilitation Through 
Training; Virginia Municipal League; Virginia 
Municipal League - Environmental subcommit- 
tee; American Society of Planning Association; 
Subcommittee on Transportation for the Elderly 
and the Handicapped; - Tidewater Ballet Associa- 
tion, past president; Member of Ad Hoc 
Environmental Committee Norfolk Airport; Advi- 
sory member of the STAMA Board (Southeastern 
Tidewater Area Manpower Authority); Consolida- 
tion Feasibility Study Committee, chairman; 
serves with the Hampton Roads Cultural Action 
Plan; Bnai Israel Congregation, Norfolk, Vh^ 
Hadassah; and Board of Childrens Camp Fund^,. 
Funds. 

Awards: Ford Motor Co. National Community 
Service Award, 1973; Outstanding Wanan in 
Virginia Beach, Alpha Mu Chapter of Alpha Delta 
Kappa, Oct. 1978; and I^tinguished Pditical 
Service Award from the Virginia Beach Republi- 
can Woman's Qub, 1979. 



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Jones 



Continued from Page I 

Senate of Virginia as a Democrat." 

Canada is more experienced in legislative matters 
than Canada, an observation of which Jones is keenly 
aware. 

"I have to give them (the voters) some good reasons 
why I thinic they should vote for me," Jones said. 'Tm 
sure at the point that I'd declare I'd have some 
statements to initiate the reasons why the public should 
start thinking about my perspective on the issues as 
q?posed to Joe's perspective J' 

Canada would not discuss Jc9ies' possible opposition 
to him specifically, because Jones has not formally 
declared himself a candidate for the seat. But Canada 
welcomes any and all challenges. 

"1 think it's good for the system," Quiada, an 
attorney, said. "We need ideas; different approaches. 
I'd be disappointed if I didn't have opposition." 

Over the years, among other things, Canada has had 
passed a drunk driving bill; a drug paraphenalia bill 
and secured $5.4 million for Virginia Beach's Tidewater 
Community Cdlcge. This past session he had [Mssed 
Senate Bill 345, allowing for victim impact sutements 
in the courts. The statement says what significant 
physical, psychd<«ical or economic injury was caused 
to the victim. 

If Canada is reelected to another four-year term, he 
would like to focus more attention on illicit drugs. 

"1 want to wotk in the drug field," Canada said. "I 
think we've made some big prepress legislatively. Hofw 
much that's translated into actual changes I'm nrt 
really sure." 

Qinada said Virginia Beach is experiencing as much 
drug traffic, of not more, than ever. 

"I think we are," he said. "I think perhaps there's 
been a shift of emphasis from marijuana to cocaine. 
There's more cocaine now than in the past. However, I 
think that some of those invdved with it are getting a 
little apprehensive. We've had a few convictions of 
significance. Hopefully this will have an affect. 

"I still believe very strongly that a peraon who is 
involved with a large amount of drugs should go to ^ 
for a long time; so we can teU those drug dealers, 'stay 
out of our sute because if you're going to be involved 
with drugs you're going to jail.'" 

Canada also said there's people in Virginia Beach 
who are aware of drug trafficking, but not reporting it. 

"I fed very strongly thiU there we many, many, many 
people out there that know a tot about the dnig 
trade and don't say anything," Canada said. The 
police can't do it all. They need the help <rf every man, 
woman and child." 

Canada also said he is "very encouraged" over what 
progress has been made in the state in regard to drunk 
driving. 

Canada, who has before called for the direct election 
of the city mayor, said he may call for it i«ain. 

"This is not aimed at any person," he said, "ami I 
want to make this clew. It was not aimed at tl« in-esent 
mayor. It was started long before he wis even on tlw 
council. Evidently it has br<*en down, or people have 
perceived it to be a slap in his fiwe; out it's not. 
Anyway, there are a lot of people who agree that it may 
be on the ballot as an advisory referendum." 

Qmdidates have until mid-April to ^clare. Jones 
says he'll wait until near then to anrnxmce whether 
he'll q?posc Canada. 

"If I'm going to run 1 don't need to be out too mw* 
before ^at," he said. 



Ti(kw8ter's First Car Cram will be 1^1 Bi 
Fonbroke Mall on Saturday. April 23. Green Run 
High School's Key Oub will spc»s(M- the spedal 
event in order to raise numty for tbe Tictewato^ 
Chapter of the Muscular Dystrophy Association. 

Any busings or organization interested in sptw- 
soring a car for the day's event should contact the 
Muscular Dystn^y offiiX at 461-0177 or 122- 
8091 on the Pemmula. AppUcatioo and atry fees 
(tax dwluctibte) are due prior t April 12, 1 W3. 



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Virqinia Beach Public Notices 



Council Picks Thalia Site 



Continued from Page 8 

of the Board asked me to 
say we feel we have given 
it very careful attention." 
He urged council to rc- 
afflrm its plan to build at 
Thalia and to proceed with 
the project. 

Councilman Dr. J. 
McCoy Jr. said that while 
he supported the need to 
shop around, he saw no 
point in looking around for 
a committee to say what 
we want them to say." 

He said the board is 
made up of 11 members 
and with the 1 1 members 
of Council are sufficient to 
make a decision. "Too 
many cooks spoil the 
broth," he said. 

Councilwwnan Mcyera 
Oberndorf said that the 
Board which is caistituted 
like Council (seven mem- 
bers represent boroughs), 
and four are at-large 
members is a reflection of 
City Council. She ques- 
tioned that the Board said 
there would be $2 millioi 
in savings. 

The report states that 
locating the central library 
adjacent to TCC will not 
result in a $2.S million 
savings in the 1985-86 
Charter Bond Debt, but 
would require a reconfig- 
uration for the library's 
capital devel(^ment pro- 
gram and which may^ 
result in the construction 
of a smaller and [>erhaps 
less expensive building to 
meet the needs of south 
Kempsville. Any savings 
"will be significantly less 
than $2.5 million," the 
report states. 

Jennings sakf "the 
25,000 square fod^ library 
contemplated fdf the 
South Lynnhaven \ Area 
library near the intersec- 
tion of Lynnhaven Park- 
way and R'incess Aime 
Road represents a $2.5 
million expenditure. 
According to the report 
this library would be 
"inapprc^riate if the cen- 
tral library were located 
next to TCC. He also said 
that the TCC site was only 
12 minutes from Provi- 
dence and Kempsville 
Roads. 

He said the city may 
become "library poor" 
and that Council has to 
look at other priorities 
fu-st. 

Oberndorf said she con- 
sidered the libraries as 
extension of the educatiai 
system. She said it was 
extremely difficult for 
children to go to Kim 
MemOTial Library in Nor- 
folk or the Old Dominion 
University Library in Nor- 
folk for research. She said 
that she did not vote foe 
the site on Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, but that now 
it's a fact. She said it 
would be easier for citi- 
zens to get there than to 
get to the TCC site on 

Princess Anne Road. 

If 

Oberndcfff pointed out 
that the report also said 
that if the Ubrary were 
relocated, that would 
argue for the reconsidera- 
tion of an appropriate 
library facility cwi the 
Little Neck Peninsula. The 
Capital Improvement Pro- 
gram for 1980-85 esti- 
mated that a 7,000 
square-foot single-story 
library of 42,000 vdumes 
in that area wcHild cost 
approximately SI. 3 
million. 

Jennings, who repre- 
sents the Little Neck area 
as a Councilman frcma the 
Lynnhaven Borough, 
retorted that his interests 
were not parochial, that 
he had just seen a state- 
ment Ml the operating 
budget and saw a possible 
real estate tax increase. 
"1 will not back off," he 
said. 

Councilman Harold 
Heischdjer recalled that 
when the Hialia site was 
selected a library at Little 
Neck was put on the back 
burner. The people from 
little Neck were assured 
they will have the central 
library in their area. 

He said what bothered 
him was that ccHitractors 
were getting busy and the 



city was talking about a 
90,000 square foot build- 
ing at a cost of $11 
millicm. Even a small 
increase in building costs 
would add up a big 
increase in expenditure 
for the city. He said he did 
not want to be a political 
referee and that the fact 
that Jannings put the 
Library board to w(»-k 
studying alternatives was 
good. 

Jennings then said he 
was not reacting out of 
anger, but noted that the 
Ubrary had grown from a 
$1.3 million facility to an 
$$U miUioi facility three 
years later. He said Prin- 
cess Ssxait Road is sche- 
duled fcH" improvement 
this year or next. He said 
it will be four-laned from 
Edwin Drive to Lynn- 
haven Parkway. 

Oberndorf said the 11 
members of the library 
board do not get any 
remuneration. The recom- 
mendations they give 
Council, she said, are not 
given because they will 
gain or lose and are not 
out of "malevolent or 
selfish interests," but as 
the result of a lot of 
dedicated services. 



the 
the 
the 



Jennings said it 
appeared the staff pre- 
pared most of the report. 

McQanan then pointed 
out confiision between the 
Library's capital budget 
and the city's capital bud- 
get. Some of the library 
projects referred to are 
not in the city's capital 
budget. 

After the vote, 
McClanan asked that 
Council be given the 
opportunity to see 
specifications which 
staff will give to 
architect. She also wchi- 
dered about the raie-third 
office space reserved in 
the new building. 

Councilman Robert G. 
Jones remarked about the 
high cost. 

Robertson pdnted out 
the $11 million was (mly 
ffi estimate and that Pub- 
lic Works always has high 
figures. 

He said that the CBN 
library under construction 
is costing $65 a square 
(versus the $122 square 
focM iac the city estimate) 
and that building is "much 
more grandiose than 
we're going to be in (Hir 
building." 



Public Hearing 



l*iibllcllMrbig 



NblellMrhif 



MbRcHMrbif 



n !^^^lZI1 



Council Summary 



Continued from Page 8 
Drive and Princess Anne Road (Kempsville Borough). Letter 
from the City Manager transmits the recommendation of the 
Planning Commission for approval. Approved l(M). Kitchin 
absent. 

•Application of Mrs. G. J. Oulbranson and Mrs. Nancy Vest 
for a change of zoning from R-5 Residential District to O-I Of- 
fice District on a 4.41 -acre parcel located along the north side 
of Providence Road, east of Indian River Road (Kempsville 
.Borough). Letter from the City Manager transmits the recom- 
mendation of the Planning Commission for approval. Ap- 
proved 11 -0. 

•Application of Dimensions, Inc. for a change of zoning 
from R-5 Residential District to A-1 Apartment District on a 
4.97-acre parcel located along the south side of Baxter Road, 
east of Princess Anne Road (Kempsville Borough). Letter from 
the City Manager transmits the recommendation of the Plan- 
ning Commission for denial. Approved 8-3. Henley, Kitchin, 
Oberndorf dissenting. 

•Application of ERA Arnhold and Company, Inc. for a 
change of zoning from R-8 Residential District to R-9 Resident 
District on a 16,988-square foot parcel located along the nor- 
thwest corner of Princess Anne Road and Belingham Road 
(Kempsville Borough). Letter from the City Manager transmiu 
the recommendation of the Planning Commission for denial. 
Denied 10-0. R. Jones absent. 

•Application of Dominion Building Corporation for a 
modification to the Land Use Plan of Timberlake to include a 
commercial site of 1.092 acres located at the southwest corner 
of Independence Boulevard and Foxwood Drive (Kempsville 
Borough). Letter from the City Manager transmite the recom- 
mendation of the Planning Commission for approval. Ap- 
proved 11-0. 

• Unfinished Business 

Motion by Councilman Jennings to stop work on cenUal 
library project and appoint citizens committee to recommend 
alternate sites. Denied 9-2. Jennings and McClanan voting for 
approval. 



Council at 5 p.m. continued executive session and from there 
adjourned. 



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LUNCHEON S'llO Tuesday- Saturday 

BUFFET ^ 

NIGHTLY 
ENTERTAINMENT 

Ray Brown At The Piano 




Superior Court For 
The State of Alaska 
Third Judicial District 
In the Matter of the Adop- 
tion of Robbi Jo Bertrand 
and Robert Wayne Ber- 
trand, minors. 
Case No. 3AN-83-72 P/A 
To: Robert Wayne Ber- 
trand 
NOTICE OF ABSENT 

DEFENDANT 
You, the natural father 
of the above minor 
children, are hereby 
notified that a Petition has 
been filed in the above 
Court for the adoption of 
the above named minor 
children and that the 
hearing upon said Petition 
is set for the 23rd day of 
\May, 1983, at the hour of 
2:30 p.m., in Room 237 of 
the above Superior Court, 
303 K Street, Anchorage, 
Alaska. Grounds for 
dispensing with your con- 
sent to this adoption are 
that you have failed to 
communicate meaning- 
fully with the child and to 
provide for the child's 
support for more than one 
year without justifiable 
cause. Any objections to 
the granting of the 
Petition must be presented 
at the time and place set 
for hearing and failure to 
do so may result in the en- 
try of a Decree of Adop- 
tion forevfer terminating 
your parental rights with 
respect to said minors. . 

A copy of this ap- 
plication is available for 
public inspection during 
regular business hours at 
the following address: 
6636 Chartwell Drive, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
23464. 
I89-3T 3/23 VB 

Public Notice 
Notice is hereby given 
that on February 22, 
1983 an application was 
filed with the Federal 
Communications Com- 
mission in Washington, 
D.C. by Tidewater Broad- 
casting Company, Inc. for 
authority to construct a 
new commercial television 
station on UHF Channel 
43 -I- , in Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, with the 
following technical 
facilities: Channel 43 +, 
644-650 Mhz; 5,000 kW 
visual and 500 kW aural 
effective radiated power. 
The proposed transmitter 
site is 2.2 miles West of 
the Intersection of Route 
17 and Route 64 with 
geographic coordinates 
North Latitude 36" 45' 
23" and West Longitude 
76" 23' 06". Height above 
average terrain of 522.9 
feet, with nondirectiohal 
antenna. Studio location: 
a site within the Virginia 
Beach city limits to be 
determined at a later date. 

The officer, director 
and sole shareholder of 
Tidewater Broadcasting 
Company, Inc. is 
Celestine L. Willis. 

Dated this 8 day of 
March, 1983. 
Mary F. LaFollette 
Attorney for Petitioner 
191-2 3T 3/30 VB 

Public Notice 
Notice is hereby given 
that on February 23, 1983, 
Virginia Beach Television, 
Inc. filed an application 
with the Federal Com- 
munications Commission 
for construction permit 
for a new UHF Television 
Broadcast Station on 
Channel 43, 644-650 
MHz, at Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. This station 



Fall Meab Served 
1:30 IB. - 2 am. 



c> 




SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 



TMsday tkra ^tarday 
CtetcdMoBday 



3il# HIGH STREET 

PORTSMOUTH 

3f7-«I% 



Lavenstein 
Certified 

Lance Lavenstein, a 
Virginia Beach resident 
and President of Laven- 
stein Companies, Inc. has 
received the designation of 
Certified Property 
Manager, CPM, from The 
Institute of Real Estate 
Management. 



would operate with 
maximum effective 
radiated power of 331.9 
kilowatts visual, 33.2 
aural, and use an antenna 
with height of 518 feet 
above average terrain. The 
transmitter would be 
located 0.7 miles southeast 
of the junction of Princess 
Anne and Indian River 
Roads, Pungo borough, 
city of Virginia Beach. 
The main studio would be 
located within Virginia 
Beach at a site to be 
determined. The officers, 
directors and 10 percent or 
greater stockholders of 
Virginia Beach Television, 
Inc. are As follows: Har- 
vey m. Budd» Mark Kane 
Goldstein, Thomas G. 
Sonsini, Dennis J. Kelly 
and American Satellite 
and Television, Inc. 

A copy of this ap- 
plication, together with all 
amendments and related 
materials, is available for 
public inspection week- 
days during regular 
business hours at the 



Virginia Beach Public 
Library, 936 Indepen- 
dence Boulevard, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 
189-11 3T 3/23 VB 



LEGAL NOTICE 
Take notice that on 
March 28, 1983 at 10:00 
a.m. at the premises of 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA >lall Pontiac GMC 
Honda, Inc., 3152 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
23452, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, 
for cash, reserving unto it- 
self the right to bid, the 
following motor vehicles: 
1982 Honda Prelude. 
Serial Noi^ JHMSN5222C- 
C033153; 1975 Olds. 
Omega, Serial No. 3B27- 
D5WI01409; 1976 Pon- 
tiac, Serial No. 2W872- 
6N575446. \ 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA Hall Pomiac GMC 
Honda, Inc. 
F. C. Rice 
comptroller 
191-7 IT 3/23 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia on Mraiday, April 11,1983, at 
2:00 p.m. at which time the following applications will 
be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Dr. Robert W. 
Waddell, Trustee for Virginia Beach Orthopedic 
Associates Employee Profit Sharing Plan for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
District to A-3 Apartment District on certain property 
located on the Northwest side of Witchduck Road 
beginning at a point 490.45 feet Southwest of Ferry 
Plantation Road, running a distance of 203.77 feet 
along the Northwest side of Witchduck Road, running a 
distance of 492.99 feet in a Northwesterly direction, 
running a distance of 235 feet in a Northeasterly direc- 
tion and running a distance of 408.09 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction. Said parcel contains 2.476 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Applicatiai of Margaret R. Mills 
and Garphine E. Smith for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential 
District to A-1 Apartment District on certain property 
located 412.75 feet East of Lawrence Drive beginning at 
a point 304 feet North of Daniel Smith Road, running a 
distance of 333.50 feet in a Northeasterly direction, 
running a distance of 572 feet in a Southeasteriy direc- 
tion, running a distance of 356.38 feet in a South- 
westerly direction and running a distance of 570 feet 
more or less in a Northwesterly directioi. Said parcel 
contains 5 acres more or less. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of Shore Drive 
Associates for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
mini-warehouses on certain property located on the 
South side of Shore Drive beginning at a point 259.32 
feet East of Diamond Springs Road, running a distance 
of 509.46 feet along the South side of Shore Drive, run- 
ning a distance of 287.83 feet along the Eastern property 
line, running a distance of 640.81 feet along the 
Southern property line and running a distance of 276.14 
feet along the Western property line. Said parcel con- 
tains 3.631 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of Thrift Car Care, 
Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
automobile and small engine repairs on certain property 
located at the Southeast corner of Haygood and 
Aragona Boulevard, running a distance of 150 feet 
along the South side of Haygood Road, running a 
distance of 150 feet along the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 150 feet along the Southern 
property line and running a distance of 150 feet along 
the East side of Aragona Boulevard. Said parcel con- 
tains 22,500 square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of Patrick L. Stan- 
ding for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 3 
duplexes at the Southeast intersection of Lakewood Cir- 
cle and Mediterranean Avenue on Lots B, C & D, Lot 
104, Lakewood. Said parcels contain 16,161.7 square 
feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH:/ 

6. Appeal from D«:isions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Newsome Farm Associates. Proper- 
ty located at the Northwest corner of Connie Lane and 
Lawrence Drive. Plats with more detailed information 
are available in the Department of Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

Department of Planning. 

Allinterested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

City Clerk 

191-4 2T 3/30 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday. April 6, 1983, at 
7:30 p.m., in the Council Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The staff will be at 6:45 p.m. in the City Manager's 
Conference Room. The following applications will ap- 
p^r on the aenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 
1. Mrs. Michael Kelley requests a variance to allow 



parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion ot a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 32, BlocK a. 
Section L-8, Green Run. 1438 Peony Arch. Princess 
Anne Borough. , 

2. Joseph M. and Moira A. Kelly requests a variance of 
23 feet to a 7 foot setback from the 15 foot lane ad- 
joining the south property line instead of 30 feet as 
required (through lot - 2nd story dormers) <»> Lot iw, 
The Hollies, 229 Bay Colony Drive. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

3. Ronald V. and Johan M. LeBude requests a variance 
of 2.1 feet to a 2.9 foot side yard setback (east side) in- 
stead of 5 feet as required (deck) on Lot 21, Block 16, 
Section 12, Aragona, 549 Longfellow Avenue, Bayside 
Borough. 

4. Stanley G. Gill requests a variance of 12 feet to an 8 
foot side yard setback adjacent to a street (Wake Forest 
Avenue) instead of 20 feet as required (attached garage) 
on Lot 51, Plat Number 1, Cape Story by the Sea, 2684 
Ocean Shore Avenue. Lynnhaven Borough. 

5. Kenneth N. Whitehurst, Jr. requests a variance of 10 
feet to a 20 foot front yard setback (45th Street) and of 
20 feet to a 10 foot setback from the 20 foot alley ad- 
joining the south property line instead of 30 feet each as 
required (through lot) on Lot 81, Section B, Cavalier 
Shores, 45th Street. Virginia Beach Borough. 

6. Lawrence W. Yoakum requests a variance of 4 feet in 
fence height to 8 feet in fence height instead of 4 feet in 
fence height as allowed in a required side yard adjacent 
to a street (Crashaw Street) on Lot 12B, Block K, Sec- 
tion 2, Chimney Hill, 3631 Addison Street. Kempsville 
Borough. 

7. William P. Harris requests a variance of 1 foot to a 9 
foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required (ac- 
cessory building - garage) on Lot 21, Block 48, Section 
9, Aragona, 5033 Whitman Lane. Bayside Borough. 

8. Coy M. Beasley requests a variance of 3 feet to 5 foot 
side yard setbacks, both sides, instead of 8 feet each as 
required (new duplex) on Lot 12, Block 32, Ocean Park, 
W. Stratford Road. Bayside Borough. 

9. 84 Lumber Company requests a variance of 2 feet in 
fence height instead of a 4 foot fence as allowed in a 
required front yard setback Parcel 3-B, Subdivision of 
Parcel 3, The Lakes, 1955 Lynnhaven Parkway. Prin- 
cess Anne Borough. 

10. James L. Smith requests a variance of 25 feet to a 25 
foot front yard setback instead of 50 feet as required 
and of 9 feet in building height to 44 feet in height in- 
stead of 35 feet in height as allowed on a Parcel 1.436 
acres. Little Neck Point, 3789 Trading Point Une. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

11. C. O. Nugent requests a variance of 13 feet to a 7 
foot side yard adjacent to a public right of way (10 foot 
lane) instead of 20 feet as required (pwch additirai) cm 
Lot 7, Section B, Cavalier Shores, 300 Cavalier Park. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

12. Richard Maddox requests a variance of 2 feet in fen- 
ce height instead of a 4' fence as allowed in a required 
front yard setback on Lots 17, 18, and 19, Block 62, 
Shadowhwn, 911 Goldsboro Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

13. George J. and May M. Rhoade requests a variance 
of 6 feet to a 4 foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet 
as required (accessory building) on Lot 4, Block E, Sec- 
tion 1, Huntington, 264 Coventry Road. Kempsville 
Borough. 

14. Robert H. and Judith L. English requests a variance 
of 16 feet to a 14 foot setback from Providence Road in- 
stead of 30 feet as required (through lot - swimming 
pool) on Lot 1, Block CC, Section 5, Bellamy Manor 
Estates, 4696 Lark wood Drive. Kempsville Borough. 

15. Michael C. Chester requests a variance of 1 .5 feet in 
building height to 36.5 ft. in height instead of 35 ft. in 
height as allowed on Lot 5, Block 11, Sandbridge 
Beach, Pompano Lane. Princess Anne Borough. 

16. Country Day Care Center requests a variance of 63 
square feet of ^gn area to 163 square feet of sign area 
instead of 100 square feet of sign area as allowed and of 
1 free-standing sign to 2 free standing signs instead of 1 
free-standing sign as allowed on Parcel C-2D, Srction 
D3, Part 5, Green Run P.U.D., 1305 Windmill Point 
Crescent. Kempsville Borough. 

17. Spabbs, Inc. requests a variance to allow vehicular 
maneuvering on a public right of way (10 foot alley) 
directly incidental to enterii^ or leaving a parkii^ space 
on private property where prohibited on Lots 12, 13, 
and 14, Block A, Section 8, Virginia Beach Park; I8th 
StrMt and Baltic Avenue. Virginia Brach Borough. 

18. Sand Dollar Associates requests a variance of 5 feet 
to a "0" setback from the east property line (Boar- 
dwalk) instead of 5 feet as required on Lots 1 , 2, and 3. 
Block 23, Virginia Beach, 24th Street and Atlantic 
Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. Seashore Management, Ltd. and Burlage Cor- 
poration requests a variance to allow 89 parking spaces 
to be a minimum of 7.5 feet wide of 18.5 feet in length 
instead of 9 feet wide by IQ feet in length as required 
and to allow no more than 23i?o (60 parking spaces) of 
the parking spaces on this site to be stacked parking 
where prohibited and to aUow the parking aisles to be 20 
feet wide instead of 22 feet wide as required for parking 
at a 90* angle on Lots 1 1 through 22, Block 9, Virginia 
Beach Development Company, 801 Atlantic Avenue. 
Vvginia Beach Borough. 

2. Burlage Corporation requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
"0" setback from the east property Une (Boardwalk) in- 
stead of 5 feet as required and to allow parking in the 
required 5 foot setback from the west (Atlantic 
Avenue), the north and south property Unes where 
prohibited and to allow 4 parking spaces to be 9 feet 
wide by 16 feet in length instead of 9 feet wide by 20 fwt 
in length as required on Lots 1 through 12, Block 9, 
Map of Virginia Beach, 804 Atlantic Avenue. Virginia 
Beach Borough. 

3. John W. Kellam requnts a variance of 15 feet to a 5 
foot front yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
and of 6 feet to a 4 foot rear yard setback instep of 10 
feet as r^iaired and of 4 fMt to a 4 foot side yard set- 
back (north side) instead of 8 feet as r^uired and to 
aUow the structure to have a 44.5% lot coverage instead 
of 40% of lot coverage as allowed (dwelling unit) on 
Part of Lot 21, Block 8, Chesapeake Shores, Fentress 
Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 

K)ARD. , 

Garland L. Isdell 

S«3-etary 

191-5 2T3/30VB 



\.i 



mm 



iiWi^i 



March 23, 1983 



Classified Ads 



l.Am 



^ 



JUNK CARS AND TRUCXS • 

Towed free. Some bought. Odl 

485-1961 or 485-5859. 

— - ITTN 

FREE - PREPARATORY cour- 
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examination. For details call 
Russell Harrison 420-3120 or 
nights 547-5500. HiOOINGS 
REALTY INC. 

— :: t:4t.4/<i 

CREDIT PRdfLEMSr - 
Receive a Mastercard or Visa, 
Guaranteed, No body refused; 
for free Brochure send Self Ad- 
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CREDIT DATA, P.O. Box 
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call ANYTIME 214;324-5944. 

l-4t-4/6 



Aiqr PuiMMc Real Eiialc LoMM 

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Reflnuce Mortwes 

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Pay Judgcmcats Or 

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After Hoars 4t6-42l5 



INCOME TAX - and Account- 
ing (including tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Call 463-6608. 

ITFN 




If you want to DRINK 
that's your business I 




If you want to STOP 

Call: 499-8865 

Private/Confidential 

(phone if someone close 
needs help ) 




GEORGETOWN ^ 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Homes d Custom 

Builders 

SALfcS OFFICE 
333 Pntvidence Rd. 



CALL 464-9317 



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JUNK CARS - Wrecked or nut- 
nii4 cuh-free towing. We «d(0 
buy used radiatOTs and baitoics. 
7 days a wcdc. CaU 487-9222 or 
after 6 p.m. 487-9222. 
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CREDIT PWnUEMS? Receive 

a Mastoxard or Visa, Guaran- 
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^ochure send Sdf Addressed 
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DATA. P.O. Box 271084, Oa^ 
Texas 7S227 or caU ANYTIME 
214-^24-3944. 

l-4t-4/6 



1979 «>NDA ■ 185 Twin Star, 
Mack, electric kick start, dual 
exhaust. Was S795 oidy SS95. 
Call anytime home 427-1477, 
w(»k 463-5040. 

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SilMrts 



S-2 SAIL - BOAT. 23 feet, out- 
board, trailer, excellent con- 
dition. Call 425-3804. 
82T4-6 



CXEDITPRORLEMr 

Receive a Mastercard or Visa. 
Guaranteed, nobody refused; for 
free Brochure send Sdf Ad- 
dressed Stamped Envelope' to 
Credit Dau, Box 271084, Dallas 
Texas 75227 or Call Anytime 
214-324-5944. 
14T4/6 

ORIENTAL GIRLS SEEK 
American men for friendship, 
marriage. Individual introduc- 
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Equator. Box 57031 1-AlS. 
Miami. FU. 33157. 
24T4-1 3 

DIET AND HEALTH ^EKERS 

Safest most effective diet and 
nutrition plan now available. 
AMA and FDA approval. In- 
dividual or group program 
gtuu'anteed to build health. Call 
421-311^-=™----=? 

24T3/30 

LADY WITH A JEEP, (Age 47) 
would like to meet a man with a 
boat. Object is oul-door 
recreation. Reply to P. O. box 
1282, Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 . 
24T4-6 

RECEIVE A MASTERCARD' 

OR Visa. Guaranteed, nobody 
refused; for free brochure call 
House of Credit, toll free 1-800- 
44M531 anytime. 

2TTN 



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MAZDA • 1913, silver. BMtor BO 
good, Ri2 four door. $100 or 
best offer. Can |20:-O4««. 

.. 4^-3/» 

PARTS - 1968 Skyhvk Buicic^ 
excellent engine and tran- 
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car. Call Wednesday thru Sun- 
day at 427-1901. 
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1974 GRAN TORINO • Dark 
Green. Good student transpor- 
tation, just inspected. Runs very 
good. S89S.00. 421-9279 or 421- 
9060. 
44T3-30 

TOYOTA - D)rcJla,*1975, new 
inspection, new tires, in good 
mechanical conditio, does not 
bum (Ml, good mileage, body in 
very good condition. $1595 
n^otiable. 001583-9343. 

44T3-23 



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High Quality At Low Price 

. BABY 

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Baby Furniture by Basset i 
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ISM Lymiinvn Phwy. 

hi<ii««aR«a 

M-» 1*4 SM It-S 



TELEPHONE SALES - M'^' 
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No experience necessary. We 
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housewives. Call 627-1999. 
lOTFN 

OWNER-OPERATORS 

ICC Country Wide General 
Commodity Specialized Carrier. 
Long or short runs - vans, flats 
or reefers, with or without 
trailers, 2 years over road ex- 
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73 or later tractor, terminal ad- 
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<n>enings. call (804) 798-9097 Mr. 
Bowman. 

10 2T 3-16 

AUTO BODY REPAIR instruc- 
tor in the rehabilitative school 
authority's school at St. Brides 
Correctional Center located in 
Chesapeake, Virginia. Starting 
salary $14,556 depending on 
education and experience. Ap- 
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vocational education certiricate 
which requires a high school 
diploma and six years experience 
in the trade. Send a completed 
state application to the 
rehabilitative school authority; 
101 North 14th Street, Rich- 
mond, Virginia 23219 before 
March 31, 1983 for additional in- 
formation call: Dr. Don Stowers 
at (804) 421-7141. EOE. 
10 IT 3-23 

CONSTRUCirnON MANAGER 

General Superintendent. 
Medium sized and growing 
commercial/industrial contrac- 
tor seeking mature self starting 
individual with indepth construc- 
tion knowledge and hands on ex- 
perience, must be capable of 
communicating with properly 
motivating job superintendent as 
well as communicating with 
owner/customers. Send com- 
plete resume to: L. White Co., 
Inc., 2(M Hudgins Rd., Fred- 
ricks, VA 22401. All repUes held 
confidential upon request. 
10 5T 3/30 

ROUTE SALES • Will find thi 
offer attractive. $200 oppor 
tunity to start per week. 
Maximum opportunity, $500 per 
week. Call: 547-2177. 
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NEW OPENINGS - Fot nation- 
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train. $15,000 plus a year. For 
information caU 1-312-931-7051. 
104T4-6 



I 



HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 

Room additions for lUl 

pirposci. Convert 

garage, raise dorsMrs. 

Any ty|M of improv- 
ment. Bathroom and 
Kitchen remodeling. 

R. H. BLACK 

3994359 397-7178 



l«.HelpWMttd 






CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



20 words or less - $4.40. Additional words - 22« each. 
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cost of single ad $ 

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121T3'I 



13.Pfts 



CHOW-CHOW • 3 months old, 

light cinnamon coloring, loves 

people, registered, has all shots, 

etc. Best offer accepted. Call: 

482-4530. 

13 2T 3-30 

GERMAN SHEPARD Pup- 
pies - AKC registered, for pet 
or diow. $150 and up. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 
SHEPARDS. Call 488-8085. 

__^ 13 -TFN 

GOLDEN RLTkJKIVER - For 
Stud, AKC registered, dark 
golden, 2Vi year old, champion 
bloodline. Choice of fee or pick 
of litter. Call after 5, 804-653- 
2051. 
I3TFN 

STOP LIVING IN FEAR- 

Complete Dog Training 3 mon- 
ths to 3 yean. Licensed from 
largest K-9 Corp. in the nation., 
an 481-6999. 
13-TFN 

SIAMCSE KrrrVNS - Red* 
Point, registered; champion, 
sired, show quUity, $200. 481- 
3358 

I3TFN 



a 9a RppNnncvs 



DRYER - Sears, excellent con- 
dition. $150. Washer, $100. 480- 
1406. 

. 15 IT 3-23 

DISHWASHER - Needs gasket. 
$25. Call 420-7719. 

i5TFN 



16.ArticiMF«rSalt 




mmm \ wm m i MMmw. wm jkk 

■Mil MMCIIE >M nt* «m Hmm 
Mon. Mm. unt iKt THYEmCWE 
rMfUni Hk IN ilMivi kf U t m kMM 



lira, iHtf m4 inf Mrv. 



n.fnraHiira 



SOFA AND CHAIRS - brown 
and Un plaid, 3 cushion, sofa, 2 
olive green velveteen barrel back 
chairs, $75 each. Black vinyl bar, 
$50. 2 bean bag chairs, white and 
yeUow $5. CaU 420-7719. 
I7TFN 

3 PIECE SOUD TEAKWOOD 

Stereo Cabinet - 85" long, lou of 
storage space for tapes and 
recorcb. Has Sony reel-to-reel 
tape deck and Sony receiver 
SRe050, 30 watts per channel. 2 
Sansui speakers, SP2000. Space 
in cabinet for turntable. AU for 
$800. CaU 588-581 1. 

I7TFN 



It. ARtiVMt 



: 



ANTIQUE KITCHEN 

Wood/coal stove. Good con- 
dition. CaU days at 547-4571 af- 
ter 6 caU 485-4684. 
18TFN 



THE BIG FLEA MARKET 
AND ANTIQUE SHOW 

Hampton Coliseum. Hun- 
dreds of Exhibitors from 7 
states. Sunday, April 10, (one 
day only) 12-9. Admission $1.50. 
'A price after 5, (804)422-9500. 
18 2T 3-30 

IVORY COLLECTION 

Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne neck- 
laces; Vases and Boxes. 1804 
GranbySt., 625-9119. Daily 10- 
5. 

18TFN 



19.lkyclM 



GIRLS BWES - 20 inch. $15. 10 
speed $35, 5 SMCd $25. Call 420- 
7719. ^ \ 

19 TFN 



21. TfllovislM/SttrM 



REAUSTIC RECEIVER • STA 

225, 65 watts per channel. Ex- 
cellent condition. $225. Call 547- 
4571 ask for Mike or after 5:00 
call4»^^53. 

, 2 1 -TFN 

SEARS STEREO - AM/FM, 8 
track, turn Uble. $50. Call 420- 
7719. 

214TTFN 



22.l«w«lnr 



SWIMMING POOL SUDE - 

$250, Galvinized Big T Gym set, 
$20. 3 by 5 black slate black 
board, $15. CaU 420-7719. 
16 TFN 

METAL PYRAMID SHELVING - 

19 foot long, 4 feet wide. Some 
shelves missing. $25. Call 480- 
Jl 13 weekdays. 9-5. 

16 4T 3-30 



Uiuir^ 



miasiai 



24.Waiitt4T0Biiy 



TABLE SAW - Prefer carbide 
blade. WUl pay cash. CaU 627- 
50208 - 5 p.m. Ask for Usa. 



TO MIY 

comR 

4 MASS 

tALL 
Joe il. Decker 
Compuiy, Inc. 

622-19S0 



IL. 



24.WanttilToBuy 



CASH PAID - Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire housefulls. Also, good 
used furniture. Call 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24 TFN 



25.6M4TliiiigsT»Eat 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS - 

Across from Hurd Seafood 
Restaurant. Shucked in own 
natural jucies. By quarts, pints, 
orbusheb. Call340-SI7l. 

2.5-FN. 



26. EiitlrtaNiiiMiit 



LADIES JEWELRY FOR SALE 

One ladies cocktaU ring with 45 
diamonds and is 14 carat yellow 
gold. Also a 14 carat white gold 
23 jewel ladies Bulova watch. 
Ring appraised at $3400 and 
watch appraised at $1900. WiU 
seU either for half the appraised 
value. CaU 547-0858 after 5:00 
p.m. 22 TFN 



J.A. Jones Constructioii Company, 

6060 St. Albans Street. Charlotte. N.C. 28287, 
is preparing a bid as Prime Contractor on the 
Ammunition Barge Mooring Facility, Hampton 
Roads Navy Ammunition Transfer Facility on 
March 31, 1983. contract drawings and specs are 
available for viewing by prospective sub- 
contractors and suppliers at the Department of 
Highways and Transportation in Richmond, VA 
and J.A. Jones Construction Company in 
Charlotte. N.C. We encourage cairable minority 
and wonun owned busiiMss suppliers and sub- 
contn^ors to contact us. Uds should be submit- 
ted to Jack Wood, J.A. Joms Construction Com- 
pany, no later than March 30th. 1983. For ad- 
ditional information o^ntact Don Curtis at 
704-553-3M5 



fOR SALE-70 Ballroom dance 
lessons. Call Larry Dunn for 
more information 480-2 1 54. 
26-TFN 



29. Lawn A Gardan 



LANDSCAPING SERVICE - 

Lawn and Garden restoration, 
grading and seeding. Free 
estimates. 421-7350. 

28 TFN 

Commercial - Residential 
Landscaping ^r>kes 
TORO Sprinkler Systems In- 
stalled. Norih Landing Nursery 
(Next to Farmers Market), 
Virginia Beach. 427-6886 

.^ 29TFN 

JOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and lawn ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-4949. 
29 TI 

.f'S SPRING Planting lime. 
Free copy 48 page Planting 
Guide-Catalog in color, offering 
one of the most complete lines of 
fruit trees, nut trees, berry plan- 
ts, grape vines, landscaping plant 
material. Waynesboro Nurseries 
Inc., Waynesboro VA 22980. 
294T3-30 

MULCH-BUTLER AND S01> 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
while on sale. We deliver in one 
day. 853-0250 or 855-7467. 

— 29 TF, 



32. Business For Rent 



STORES AND STORAGE areas 
- All sizes. Properties unlimited. 
Marvin Goldfarb. 399-8390, 484- 
1275. 

32 TFN 



33. Apartments For Rent 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, Apartments for adults. 1 
and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
2 bedroom townhouses. We pay 
heal and hot water. The Pines. 
Call 468-2000. 
33-TFN 

APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
locatio%, one and 2 bedroom 
apartments. From S260. Rental 
office. 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

33 TFN 



35. Houses For Rant 



36. Roal Estate 



HOME RENTALS - Urgently 
needed in the Tidewater area. Lei 
us handle your property for per- 
sonal attention. Call Ellen at 
,481-3177 or 481-0612. Leiour- 
ncou Realty. 

364T-323 



3 



HOUSE FOR RENT - Wilson 
Heights, Herndon built, like 
new. 3 bedroom. V/i baths, 
greatroom with fireplace, formal 
dining room, large country kit- 
chen, and garage. Vacant. $575. 
Per month. Call 547-4555 Days, 
547-7374 Evenings. 

35 IT 3-23 



— SKCIAL LOW RATE — 

CaMMfdal- Htti4Mtisl 

PLUMMNG - ElECTRCAt 

CiMM»IIITIiy • PiUIITBIG 

Pool Service and Supplies 

Bifro« Ejilopfiio ■ CJ«»» hici 

340-8W 



37. Lots For Sale 



CEMETERY I>OTS VVoodlawn 
Memorial Gardens, 2 lots in St. 
Lukes section. Paid $800 will sell 
for $700. Call 583-9343. 
^ 37^1-3/23 



38. Mobile Hmros 



1980 FLEETWOOD .Mobile 
Home. 66 by 14, two bedrooms, 
two baths, large living room and 
kitchen. $15,500 or $1,500 down 
and assume loan of $175,00 per 
month. Please call 482-1512. 
" 38 IT 3-23 

HOLIDAY - 1975, excellent 
condition, 3 bedroom, 2 bath. 
and appliances, new vinyl skir- 
ting, plus many exras. Moving 
must sell. Home must be moved. 
$9,400 or best offer. Call 468- 
0770. I f no answer call 427-2 1 76. 
38 TFN 



39. Professional SorviMs 



40. Services 



BOOKKEEPER • Will do books 
in my home. Experienced in 
payroll and quarterly returns. 
Pick-up and delivery service. 
Call 545-4096 after 5 p.m. for 
more information and rates. ' 
40^4 TFN 

TAX RETURNS 

Dave Huff 

Accountant 

Call 481 -2687 

Bookkeeping and Tax Planning 

40-4T 3-16 

I.NCOME TAX SERVICE - 

Over 25 years combined ex- 
perfenceVlow tax fees, same day 
service. Call Commonwealth for 
free estimate, 461 -4508. 
■ 407T4-6 



41. Carpofltoir 



CARPENTRY, PAINTING, 
ROOIING ■ and all types of 
maintenance. Storm windows, 
gutters and screens repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanders Con- 
struction. 420-8453. 

41 TFN 



3 



INCOME TAX ■ and Account- 
ing (including tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd., (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Call 463-66(M. 
_ 39-TFN 

BOOKKEEPING - Monthly 
balance-sheet, P & L detailed 
trial balance from your checks 
and receipts, stubs, or register 
tapes. 941*5 and VA-5's. Up to 
200 checkbook transactions 
monthly; $45. Payables, receiv- 
able, small payroll. Chesapeake 
only. Call 420-6623. 

39-TFN 

SHARPENING - Saws, knives, 
scissors, blades, almost 
anything. Reasonable rates. 
Work guaranteed. Call 547 7645. 
• 39 TFN 

aOOKKEEPING SERVICE - 

Including quarterly payroll 
reports and bank account recon- 
ciliation. Specializing in smaU 
proprietorships. Pick up and 
delivery. Retired professional. 
Call 420-5624. 

39 TFN 



When Something Needs 
Building or Repaired, You Need 

BLACK 

BROS. 

Home Improvemcnl 
SpcciaLisl.s 
'Building tonlracU»r»RiM)fs»C'arpo(lsHJaragcs 
• Ball) Remodeled* Rootn Addition.s 
•Aluminum Sidings'Kitchen Remodeling 

545-7318 

lluKh K. Black. Sr. 




^T-^^fl^ Commercial & Residential 


** — tf^ 


I>esign - Build 




De«n P. Edwards, Inc. 


Ro(mi A(ktittons 


Cten^s 

Decks 

Cho^wake 

KH-421-9273 


Remofkling 

Concrete Work 

New Hotm Consructions 

919-261-2901 




^AX 12 Dutch Barn 

$795.00 

(CALL TODAY) 

STATE LINE BUILDERS 

Garages • Utility Barns •Any Size 

Highway 168 

Moyodt.N.C.27fM JIM LEWIS 

(919) 435^111 Home: <M4) 421-2^6 



42.CMMCwt 



CHILD CARE • Need two 
children aiiy age, excellent care 
and conditions, full time, Kem- 
Pfiville/CHarlestov^n area. After 
6 p.m.. Call 467-7 1 14. 
42 4T 4-13 

BABY! ITTING - Regular basis, 
excellent care, hot lunches, and 
snacks. Lots of alleniion. 
Sparrow Road area, call 420- 
4259. 

42 4T 3-16 



45. Exttniihiatiiif 



3 



PRESTON PEST CONTROL • 

We don't require a contract, 
special price on commercial and 
apartments, monthly rate, most 
5 room homes or mobile homes 
$15. Call for free estimate at 543- 
1898, 

. 4S4T4-6 

MASTER PEST Control - 
Scientific extermination, Sand 
and moisture control, windowsill 
and joice repair, house jacking. 
Free Termite inspection. $5 off 
on termite control, $50 off on 
rnach control with this ad. 
F.H.A. & V.A. reports given," 
Call 487-4024. 

45-661-3/9/84 



47. Noma linprovMMiit 



ADDITIONS • Rooms, garages, 

convert garages, decks, etc. 
Quality work by a licensed 
builder. Free estimates. Call 340- 
2511. 

■■. 47 TFN 

ADDITIONS, ROOMS • car- 
pentry, roofing, siding, storm 
window., storm doors, plastering, 
electric, concrete work, plum- 
bing, guttering, remodeling, kit- 
chen and baths, brick and block, 
work, aluminum siding, 
fireplaces, carpeting painting, 
specializing in p>arking areas and 
driveways, all type of 
demolition, free estimate without 
obligation, prompt service. Ser- 
ving all of Tidewater. Bonded 
and Insured, State Registered. 
Call 625-7435, 623-6148, or 499- 
5516. 

47-TFN 



SI. Nintiiig 



TYPING SERVICE - For 

businesses and individuals. 7 
days a week, IBM Selectric. 
Reasonable rates. Call either 
467-7112, Kempsville area, or 
463-0236, Hilltop/Pembroke 
area. 
40 TFN 

ANDERSON REMODELING - 

All types of home repairs. Pain- 
ting, roonng, siding, carpentry, 
etc. Work guaranteed. Free 
estimates. Insured and bonded. 
Call 588-2558. 
40TFN 

ALL TYPES ALTERNATORS 

and starters repaired. Battlcfleld 
Auto El«:tric. Call 547-3230. 

40-TFN 



PHILS PAINTING And Home 
Improvement. Free estimates, 
low rates, quality work. 465- 
Olio, after 5 p.m. or leave 
message on beeper: 441-7660. 
51 IT 3-23 

WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING-Fasi and friendly 
service, local references fur- 
nished. Call us for a free 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contractors. 420- 
3^. 

' 51 TFN 

PAINTING - Large or small 
jobs. Interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References available upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

51 TFN 



52. PlMt^npliy 



leigU photographic 

Service - Beautiful Wedding 
Memories - Photography For 
Any Occasion. Call 482-1312 
Today. "The Wedding Photo- 
graphers". 

52 TFN 



40-TFN [ 



55. BMnd tfc n/ Ptc«ittn 



BATHROCMf REMODELING - 

(M and new. Specializing in 
Mramic tile walls and floor 
covering. Reasonable rates. Free 
estimaes. 20 years experience in 
Tidewater ara. Small and large 
jobs. Guarantee all work. Call 
$47-4774 anytime. 

55 TFN 



SCStwimftAltor i t iw w 



SEARS SEWI.SG MACHINES - 

I with cabinet, $75. I without 
cabinet $25. Call 4a)-7719. 

56 TFN 



MU 



JKli, Iw IfaniH. 



4M-M43 



l^wxed/lMdM/^MMrf 



'^•^•^•^mmHmt 



'^^^'^mmi^mgi^mmmmKmmmmmmmmimmmm 



^^mmmmm 



12 Virginia Beach Sun. March 23, 1983 



Who Reads The Sun? 
Mayor Jones Does! 



Yofk Steak House 

opens its doors in 

Pemlnroke MalL 




Virginia Bcacli Mayor Louis R. Jones, reads a copy of The Virginia Beach Sun 
wlilch Im receives wecidy at tlw mayor's of flee. 



Objective, Timely 

Virginia Beach Mayor Louis R. Jones said he reads Virginia 
Beach's 57 year old community newspaper because, "it has an 
objective viewpoint about what's going on in Virginia Beach, and 
it brings information to the public in a timely fashion. ' ' 

Why not join Mayor Jones and read The Sun? 

To subscribe to The Virginia Beach Sun call 486-3430 or write 
to The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 South Rosemont Road, Virginia 
Beach, Va. 2345 L A one-year subscription, 52 issues, is only $9. 

if you care about Virginia Beach, read The Virginia Beach Sun. 




Discover a familv steak restaurant 
with more to offer. More variety (just 
look at this sampling from our menu). 
More service (courteous people who 
show you to your table, clear away 
your trays and make sure your coffee 
is always hot). And more value. We 
evj^ have son^ special menu items 
ju* far kkls priced at just $1.49. 

York is everything you'd ©cpect 
agreat family steak house to be. 
And more. 

PemlindceMall 



Open Sunday 11 am-8 pm 

Monday- Thursday 11 am-9 pm 

Friday & Saturday 11 amlO pm 

York Steak House is also located 

in New Market North Mall 

and Ibwer Mall 



Sallied Sifloin Tips 

Itader dmnks otAokx thMa, 
mtted, ton»d widi onkms and, 
like an ow mtTMs, anved with 



a choiee itf potato, s ikMh 
roll and a eriap aalad. 



Baked Flkl of 
FUiAfawndiiie 

Prcparad wtth Imbm iMrttw 
saaee and qtrliiUed with freshly 
touted almonds. $4,49 




Sbawbeny FlBBtairtic 

Fresh stnirtmries wMi widnwd 

. Jast one of onr niwloBa 



Mlh.'T'Boiie 

A big steak dbiaer Ah- 

buaaBetites.JiicK > 
tender T-Bone with aD 
the trimmings. Losdons! 

^5.99 



Honeygjazed Roast CUdEen 

SometUm nntqae. A half chkken, basted wtth 
delicate honey jdaie and slowly roasted to cook that 
delicions flavor au the way thmigh. $3 00 




*pre-<30oked weight 



©198:J York Steak House Ss'sttms, Inc. 



YORKi 

STfeAK HOllSfe I 



GoodSleak. 
lAUd aiiAole lot mtm. 



AT THE VA. BEACH PAVILION THIS WEEKEND 

'"•'■"■"■■"'■*'";■""""'■"■ THE ENERGY CUNIC 

The Energy Efficient Specialists Available For 
Free Consultation At The Tidewater Better 
Living Home Show .... . > ........ 

• MORE THAN JUST A CONTRACTOR I 

• MORE THAN JUST A BUILDER! 

• MORE THAN JUST A HOME IMPROVEMENT FIRM! 




If YOU want to do it, we want to help you. We want to show you how to do it for your- 
self. We want to sell you the energy ef ficent products that will be 

EFFECTIVE • EFFICIENT • REASONABLE 
BUT, IF YOU PREFER TO LEAVE IT IN COMPETENT, PROFESSIONAL, 
EXPERIENCED HANDS WE CAN HANDLE THAT TOO! 



Energy Efficient Home Improvements. 
Storm Windows & Doors • Replacement Windows & Doors 
Complete Roofing • Siding • Seamless Gutters. 



SPECIAL • MARCH 



625-4747 



MANSANTO® INSULATION AT NO COST WITH 
PURCHASE OF ANY VINYL SIDING CONTRACT 
AND 40 YEAR TO LIFE GUARANTEE. 



FREE ESTIMATES 

ALWAYS 



LET ENERGY CLINIC, INC. 

DO THE JOB FOR YOUI 
625-4747 3902 CoDey Aw. • Norfolk 490-8303 



IHH 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 23, 1983 IB 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



Mutual Funds 



Timing Is Vital Factor 



By Maaeline Fortuoato 

Our economic times are 
most complex today. 
While inflation seems to 
be down some of us are 
still in a dilemma not 
knowing whetho^ we are in 
a false recovery or truly 
out of the recession. Well 
for those of u& that can 
put aside this question, 
there is an opportunity to 
take advantage of good 
buying in the stock 
market. The trend is up- 



ward and the dow is at an 
all time high. 
Professionally managed 
mutual funds are an ex- 
cellent vehicle for those of 
us who lack a lot of 
money, time, and 
knowledge of the market. 
Mutual funds had their 
best year ever in 1982. 
$14.9 billion sales of all 
types other than short 
term funds were 50Vo 
higher than the previous 
record of 1980, with total 



assets of around S300 
billion. The mutual fund 
industry is 6 times as large 
as it was S years ago. It 
has 21 million shareholder 
accounts, and more than 3 
million new shareholder 
accounts were added in 
money market funds 
during 1982. and the 
average investor in these 
accounts earned ap- 
proximately 12%. In- 
vestors in mutual funds 
have exchange priveleges 



which allow them to 
reposition their invest- 
ments from one fund to 
another in the same 
management group with 
minimal or no cost. 

Most people make the 
mistake of thinking that a 
market should behave in 
a rational manner, timing 
and emotions play a vital 
role when investing, and 
this is why mutual funds 
have proven to be an ex- 
cellent investment. 



Withholding 10^(^ Of Interest and Dividends 

4 4 



Not The American Way'' 



CcHigress and Admini- 
stration are feeling the 
heat frcm taxpayers upset 
about the withhdding of 
10 per cent of interest and 
dividend income Chat will 
begin on Jiily 1 . 

Momentum is building 
for repeal of this law. In 
fact, so many savers and 
investcxrs are complaining 
that more than 340 Con- 
gressmen are co-sponsor- 
ing legislaticHi to repeal 
withhdding. 

But the Administration 
has not given up, and in 
fact has thrown a new and 
dangercus weapoi into 
the fray: Intimidation. 

Financial institutions 
that have rightly explain- 
ed how withhdding wiU 
impact taxpayers and 
have encouraged their 
depositors to write Con- 
egress abcnit the plan are 
now bearing the full 
weight of the U.S. Trea- 
sury's ire. 

Dcmald Regan, Secre- 



tary of the Treasury and 
one of withhdding 's main 
proponents, has respond- 
ed to this activity by our 
financial instituticms with 
the threat of legislative 
reprisal. Mr. Regan warn- 
ed that financial institu- 
tions "...run a grave risk 
of infuriating the tax- 
writing committees" of 
Congress if they win their 
bid to repeal the new 
withholding rule. 

TTiat's intimidation - 
and that's not the Ameri- 
can way. 

Mr. Regan and his 
allies must be wcn-ried 
abcHit the grcaind swell of 
grassroots opposition to 
this unnecessary and 
costly withholding plan, 
and he apparently is will- 
ing to use any means., 
even threats, to squelch 
cqjpositicm to this unpopu- 
lar, po(»'ly conceived and 
unnecessary law. 

But the fight to repeal is 



far from over. Arkansas 
Senator David Pryor 
strongly rebuked the 
Treasury Secretary's out- 
burst, telling Mr. Regan 
that "...it is absdutely 
appropriate for (S&Ls and 
banks) to mform their 
depositor and the gene- 
ral public of the action 
taken last summer by 
Ccmgress, action which 
will have a serious effect 
on many middle-income 
and low-income tax- 
payers." 

And those 340 Senators 
and Representatives- who 
are backing withhdding- 
repeal legislation are an 
indication that at least 
some pec^le in the federal 
government listen to their 
constituents. 

The United States 
League of Savings bistitu- 
tims pdnts out that the 
Treasury's own research 
indicates the taxpayer 
compliance rate on inter-' 
est and dividend income 



Consolidate Your Bills 

24 HdUR APPROVAL 

Home.Owner Lcmns 



•Complete Appication 
over phone 



•Deal Directly 
with Lender 




9-6 pm M-F 
9-1 pm Sat. 



LANDBANK EQUITY CORP. 

Cair' 1080 Laskin Rd. Va. Beach, Va. 2345 1 
Today (804)425-6621 _^^_^__ 



GnpMcsuppll^ & services 

Specialing in: 
•Drafting Supplies 
•Furniture 
•Blueprinting 
•Copying 
•Dry Mounting 

•Xerox Enlargement and Reductions 
•Engineering Photography 
•Fast Dependable Service 





V 



FREE PICK-UP & 
DELIVERY 

5001 Cleveland St. 
Va. Beach, VA 23462 

490-2305 

Serving the architect, enginwr, designer 
and industry over 50 years 



already is 97 per cent 
when 1099 reporting is 
involved. You can't get 
much better than that. 

And of the $4.3 billion 
the Treasury expects to 
raise from withholding, 
cmly Si. 3 billion will be 
new revenue. The re- 
mainder is taxes that are 
paid when due but which 
interest and dividend 
withholding will allow the 
Internal Revenue Service 
to collect early, -- an 
interest-free loan to the 
government fran savers 
and investors. 

Estimates place the cost 
to collect this tax at 30 to 
40 percent of the revenue 
"gain." By any standard, 
that's a terribly inefficient 
way to raise money. 

Even so, the pressures 
are enormous and the 
battle is difficult. But the 
peq}le can win. If enough 
of us complain about with- 
hdding. Congress will 
have to listen. 



S\M:V IHH6, UF'VF 
MET TIDEWATER'S 
FINA^CUl NEEDS. 

WE'RE STILL 
GROWING TO MEET 
YOIRS. 



See US for rewarding savings plans and 
specialized loans. 

Home Fedeial 

Savims and ban Association 

o( Norfolk Orgmizfd 18«6 

Office: 700 Bousit Street Norfotk VK / 627-6431 

Brancti Offices Thomas Comet Ponsmx/iti 

Naopon News / Hempton ' Suffolk / Hilltop ■ 

Oenbifh / Great Bridge / Grafton 








5* 



'•ttia^; 



J 



A Personalized Rnancial 
Plan talored specfflcally 
foryourfamly 

Are you really satisfied that your family's financial prografn 
is totally adequate for today and for the future? Have you 
realistically considered ttiose bothersonne. confusing details 
tfiat can seriously affect your plans— inflation taxes 
Social Security? Does your present method of savings, 
investfnents arnJ life insurance ownership allow you to make 
maximum use of your after-tax dollars? 

Now there's an easy way to create a realistic financial plan 
for you and y<wr family through our personalized Financial 
Planning Service. 

Hera't How It Works 

1 We collect dart from you concerning your assets, your 
needs, your c^i«;tives. 

2. This information is processed through our computers- 
programmed by specialists m the fields of investmems, 
insuranw arsJ finaticiat (banning— correlating inflationary 
factors and Social Security benefits. 

3 You receive a confidential 15- to 25-page report offering 
firm, realistic recommendations lor your family's finan- 
cial program, based on your holdings, your needs, your 
budgetary limitatiofa and your objectives 

TICflE n HO OlARGC TOR THIS SERVICE . 
AM} YOU ME IMOER NO OM^ATION 
WHATE^ TO BUY MiYTHmG. 

WADDELL & REED, INC. 

3 LfMlMvm EMcalhc Pwfc 

SiMeltS 
Vlr#iriafcaA.VA23«2 

Call 

Madeliiie Fortunato 

463-3W1 




Take The 
Deductions 

By Jol|fl Hewitt 

ThiCre are literally 
dozens of deductions that 
you can take even if. you 
do not use the "long 
form" (i.e. itemizing your 
deductions). 

Some of the most 
overlooked of these are (1) 
moving expenses; (2) job 
seeking automobile and 
travel expenses; (3) child 
care expenses; (4) energy 
saving items such as in- 
sulation, storm doors, 
ctc.;(5) a portion of 
charitable contributions; 
and (6) using your car 
for educational expenses 
and second job mileage. 

Linda Hewitt, President 
of Mel Jackson's Income 
Tax says "most people 
noiss these and many other 
deductions because their 
tax preparer doesn't take 
time to thoroughly inter- 
view them". 

"Fortunately, you can 
amend your tax return to 
take advantage of this," 
says Ms. Hewitt. 




*'I Had A Dream 



>> 



WATCH 
FOR IT 
IN MAY 




By Rip Coard 

I>avid Colvin "had a 
dream." David is owner 
of the Cedar Cove Inn, an 
elegant new restaurant 
located in the Fernwood 
Sectioi, off Great Bridge 
Boulevard and on the 
Albemarle Canal in 
Chesapeake. He and his 
wife Robin, brcxight a 
wealth of experience to 
the new venture. The 
husband-wife team also 
have successful restau- 
rant/lounges in Norfolk 
and Virginia Beach, but 
this one. said Dave is 
"exciting" and "my 
every waking hour is 
spent in finding ways to 
make it even better." The 
prq?erty Cedar Cove«'is 
situated on is practically 
surrounded by inland 
waterways that provide a 
beautiful setting for din- 
ing. From practically 
every vantage point, one 
can enjoy the view 



through large picture win- 
dows. The interim is ser- 
ved by a tremendous bar 
situated center-room, a 
seafood bar, banquet 
room for fifty, fireplace 
for elegant and romantic 
fireside dining and the 
warmth of natural wood 
and beautiful greenery 
throughout. 

The patio will seat over 
200 in the summer, and 
there are plans for an 
enormous playground for 
the kids adjacent to the 
arch-style patio. 

Situated as it is. the 
Marina , docking facilities 
and gas stations serve the 
boating community well. 
Add the interior seating 
capacity of 1 70 to the 50 in 
the banquet room and 
potential 200 on the patio 
and it doesn't take long to 
realize this is an encx- 
mous restaurant. 

"I had a dream," said 



MelJ^pkson's Income Tax 
Service 

offers 

30% Off 



I I I I I 



Dave last week, "and it's 
coming to fruition." 
Colvin is so right! Having 
eaten at the Cedar Cove 
Inn on two occasions 
already, I and many oi my 
staff can attest to the f»» 
that Eiave Colvin "has 
arrived," and Chesapeake 
is to be well served by his 
arrival! The food, prepar- 
ed by Chef Spike 
Markatos. formerly of 
Athens. Greece and a 
highly professional, total- 
ly creative "dd-country- 
cheP' with over 27 years 
experience, is superb. 

The service is the 
friendliest down-home 
style I've witnessed for 
such an elegant restau- 
rant. It is a pleasure to be 
served so quickly and 
courteously. 

A class act. unlike any 
other in Chesapeake to 
our knowledge. 



I I I I I I 



with this coupon 

For Tax Returns 

Prepared From 

March 17th -April 3rd 

only at 

2710 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Phone: 463-7913 

(near Lynnhaven) 



HOMEOWNERS - REALTORS I 

SECOND : 
I MORTGAGE loans: 



Single Family 
■' Tnwnhouses • Condnni.'iMi'i 

Home Improvemeni 
Bill Consolidation 
Business Investment 
Amortized or Balloon P.iyiiii its 
- Loans Up to S250.000 and moie 

Call Today 

(804)461-0909 



( rlllir, \I:,M. ,..- I 



i-u: 




mnlUd <J\/{ana0ancnl (^xoufx, fJne. 
ComuLlaidi. 

United Management Group, Inc. is 
a financial and management 
consulting firm assisting 
individuals, small businesses and 
corporations in ultimate 
profitability and optimum 
efficiency. 




•MORTGAGE LOANS 

•SIGNATURE LOANS FOR PROFESSIONAL 

AND BUSINESS PEOPLE 

•DEVELOP LINES OF CREDIT 

•PROVIDE TAX AND ACCOUNTING 

SERVICES 

Hours By Appointment 
804-486-7116 

Yorktown Commerce Center 

228 N. Lynnhaven Rd. 

Suite 1 17 A 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 



THE 

BEACH 

SATURDAY 

BANK. 




CentaindfilvBanh 

SATURDAY HOURS 

DRIVE-IN LOBBY 

8:30 am - 12 pm 9 am - 12 pm 

VIRGINIA BEACH LOCATIONS 



BA^SIIJt Off ICI 

Iftl2 Independence IMvd 

TIMt MAtHrNF (24 hour bulkingj 

tHINtSi CORNtROHlCt 

5015 Vii|jmiB<a<.h Blvd 

INOIA,NlllVtR(»flCt 

t2ll Indian River Road 

KEMPSMLLKpfUCt 

5131 PrtacRi Anne Read 

TIME MACHINt (24 how buknii 



LASKIN ROAD OFFICE 

\V» Latkm Road 

TIME MACHINE (24 Nw 

LYNNHAVEN OFFICE 

2777 Viriima Beadi Mvd. 

TIME MACHINE (24 kour 

PUNCXJ OFFICE 

Pwifo Siaiian 

SHORE MklVE OFFICE 

2»M Shore Ortw 

TIME MACHINE (24 kOM 



For Information, Call 466-2615 

Hours of Operation 
Monday tkrougk Friday 

Mve-lfl Lobby 

•:3«t.«.-6p.a. MoB.-Fri 9*.m.-tp.m. MM.-Tkw. 



The Bank That Works for Vir^iam. 

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2B Virginia Beach Sun, March 23, 1983 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



I 



Luxury Condos 
Rise On The Bay 

Casa del Playa b a two phase condominium 
conununity under construction three quarters of a mile 
east of the Lynnhaven Inlet Bridge at Shore Drive and 
Starfish Road (cm the east side of Westminster 
Canterbury). 

Casa del Playa employs a unique CiUifomia Spanish 
design which blends quite well with its' beach 
envir<mment. There will be two phases (buildings) (rf 
construction. The first will contain twebe units to be 
completed by July, and the second phase is scheduled 
for occupancy by January 1984. Each phase will be 
three stories and incorpotite an elevator, coveitd 
walkways, a seven foot hot tub, recreational decks and 
ground level storage areas fat your convenience. Total 
security and privacy is insured by a gate house with 
guard 24 h(wrs a day. 

All units are roughly 1400 square feet with 2 
bedroons and 2 full baths. The floor plan leaves 
nothing to be desired with its efficient use of space, but 
designed for luxurous living, witnessed by the sunken 
22 iooL living roan with fireplace. The formal living 
room affords access to a spacious balcony where by day 
you can observe the boating activities on the bay, at 
days end an und)structed technicolor sunset, and at 
night, the lights of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel 
offer as beautiful a sight as may be seen anywhere in 
Tidewater. 

A generous list of standard features includes: range 
and oven, disposal, dishwasher, compactor, no wax 
vinyl flooring, designer wallpaper in the kitchen and 



Ihe Builders Block is a 
regniar feature highlight- 
ing new coBstraction In 
Virginia Beach and 
C]ies8|>eake. 

By Dong Hiduwu 




baths, ice maker ccmnectiois, wall to wall carpeting and 
double stainless steel sinks. The energy saving 
standard features include: double pane insulated 
Mderscm windows and patio doors, insulated steel 
exterior doors, R19 (filings, Rll sidewalls, energy 
mizer water heaters and heat pump with central air. 

These units will stand as the latest tribute to the 
foresight and plannmg of the Hudgins Organization, 
whose other cont^mpory developments include: Seagull 
Bluff, Pelican Dunes, Cape Henry Villas, Roudee 
Villas, Croatan and Salt Marsh Points. The project is 
being buih by Hudgins and Associates and is marketed 
by Hudgins Real Estate. "By coitrdling a project from 
start to finish, we can assure our customers of the 
quality they expect and deserve," said Littleton "Lit" 
Hudgins. It's this type of thinking that has made 
Hudgins the leader in the develc^ment of resort 
properties. Casa del Plf ya can only further this image. 
With coistructioi still in the early stages, and 9 of the 
12 Phase 1 units sold, others obviously agree. Prices 
range from $115,000 to $140,000 in Riase 1 and 
$140,000 to $160,000 in Phase U. 




Selling Your Home 

Would You Perform Surgery 
On Yourself? 



«/ 



"Trying to sell a home 
without the aid of a 
realtor is like performing 
surgery on yourself: you 
miy §Biii^ job do«e, but 
the results often are not 
worth the effort." 

Fran Rohdenburg of 
Goodman Segar Hogan 
Residential Sales Corp. 
offered to share the 
following observations 
with persons considering 
trying to sell homes them- 
selves: 

•Setting the proper 
price for the home is not 
as simple as it may seem. 
"It involve a thorough 
understanding of the 
market, an assessment of 
the competition and an 
awareness of recent selling 
prices of comparable 
homes", Rohdenburg 
said. 

~ 'She explained that 
local buyers who know 
their way around often 
shop "For Sale by 



Chyners" in hopes of dis- 
counting the asking price 
by the amount of a normal 
real estate commission, 
which tak» the saving 
out of the seller's pocket 
and into the buyer's. A 
motivated out-of-town 
buyer doesn't have time to 
wander around looking 
for bargains in an un- 
familiar city, so the owner 
who is successful at selling 
his own house often nets 
very close to the same 
amount as he would have 
if he had sold through a 
Realtor. 

•The seller does not 
have the time nor the 
ability to screen 
"lookers" from potential 
buyers. "A conscientious 
salesperson will pre- 
qualify all buyers and only 
diow the home to prospec- 
ts with the financial ability 
to purchase. Showings 
and open houses are 
arranged to minimize the 
inconvenience to the seller 



as much as possible," she 
explained. 

•Answering the 
questions and criticisms of 
potential buyers tal^e a 
good deal of know-how. 
"It's especially difficult 
for the buyer to honestly 
critique the home in front 
of the owner, and if he 
does, it's difficult for the 
owner to answer criticisms 
objectively-without be- 
coming defensive," Roh- 
denburg said. 

•The jseller does not 
know-and can't learn 
overnight— all the in- 
tricacies of financing a 
purchase, nor the 
techniques of closing the 
transaction. "If he's not 
able to provide the buyer 
with all possible financing 
alternatives and is un- 
familiar with the dosing 
process, he easily could 
lose a sale that could have 
been put together by a 
good agent," she noted. 

•Because of his limited 



access to motivated, 
qualified buyers, it often 
takes a good deal longer 
for an owner to sell his 
home than it vrould 



Real Estate 
Management Tips 



The bistitute of Real Estate Management (IREM) 
Faindatim has published a 36-page research study, 
which investigates real estate investment returns and 
their implications few property managers. The study, 
entitled Determinants of Return m Real Estate 
bivestment and the Rde of Real Estate Management, 
was conducted and authcx^ed by George W. Gau, Ph.D., 
who is associate professes in the Urban Land 
Economics Division of the Faculty of Commerce and 
Business Administration at the University of British 
Cdumbia in Vancouver, Canada. ' 

The data set utilized in this study represents the most 
detailed and accurate sample of information on real 
estate assets ever collected in a given market. The data, 
gathered in 1980, are based on 136 apartment 
properties and 1 16 commercial prqierties sold during 
1979 in Vancouver, British Columbia. 

Among Gau's findings are: 

•Tax-loss shelters play a relatively minor role in real 
estate investment; 

•Equity gains possible from debt financing play a 
significant rede in real estate investment; 

•The higher return earned on leveraged properties is 
not a "free lunch" for the equity investors because the 
level of risk also is quite high; 

•"Economies of scale" exist in the (deration of 
apartment buildings but are absent in the case of 
commercial prc^rties. "Economies of scale" occur 
when average operating costs are lower for larger 
structures. 

•little relationship is apparent between the pri<x of a 
real estate investment and the rate of return received 
by the investor. 

These findings obviously have significant bearing on 
prqjerty management. For instance, acceding to Gau, 
"The finding that ecoiomies of scale exist in the 
operati(ni of apartment buildings, but not commercial 
buildings, has direct and significant implications for 
property managers. Because larger apartment prc^i- 
ties have lower average operating expenses per doUars 
of gross income, property managers can attain 
notew(xthy savings through the develc^ment of 
apartment projects (hi a large scale." 

Gau also pdnts out that more expensive properties 
do not consistently earn a higher rate of return. This 
implies that, "with prqper management, small inves- 
tors can do as well as large investors in real estate 
markets." 

Determinants of Return in Real Estate Investment 
and the Rde of Real Estate Management is the first in a 
series of real estate research studies commissicmed by 




Claadla Mason of Chesapeake (1.) and Ruth 
RoagktOB of Chesapeake, Avon Products District 
Manager, was a guest of the company at their New York 
City world headquarters recently in recognition for her 
ontitaBding leadership skills. She was among the 16 
other Dbtrlct Mani^ers who generated outstanding 
hUcs for 1982. The all^xpenses paid three-day trip in- 
cluded a stay at the glamorous Plaza Hotel, sumptions 
dinners at famous restaurants and a Broadway show. 

Avon is the world's leading manufacturer an* 
distributor of cosmetics, fragrances and fashion 
Jewelry. Its products are sold by approximately 1.34 
million independent sales Representatives to customers 
In 32 countries. Avon's other businesses include Mailin- 
ckrodt, Inc., a leading manufacturer of health care 
products, specialty chemicals and fw4 ingredients, 
flavora and fragrances; Tiffany & Co., and Avon 
Fashions, Inc. 



GSH Selected To 
Market White Oaks 



nome man it wouw a a,^ u^em Foundation president, "liie IRfiM Founda^ 
realtor whp belongs to ^"f^ ^„ ™,h„„- to nr«Hde ftac 



multiple listing service. 
"A seller must realize that 
time lost in selling can ac- 
tually mean money lost: 
additional cost for in- 
terest, taxes, payment of 
principal and maintenance 
of the home," Rohden- 
burg added. "If the family 
must move on and leave 
the house vacant, the costs 
really begin to climb." 

"The possible benefit 
from selling a home is of- 
ten outweighed by the 
potential problems and 
risks encountered by the 
seller along the way," 
Rohdenburg noted. 
"And," she added, "how 
do you measure the value 
of the seller's time, or how 
much a worry-free trans- 
action is worth?" 



tion will continue to provitte ftaii#ag for tbote trarthy 

endeavors which will contribute significantly to the 
overall growth, professionalism and general quality of 
the real estate industry." 



Goodman Segar Hogan 
Residential Sales Cor- 
poration has been selected 
by The Livingstone Cor- 
poration as the marketing 
organization for White 
Oaks in Timberlake, ac- 
cording to Director of 
New Homes Sales, John 
W. Bluinirng, 

White Oaks is a com- 
munity of single-family 
homes located on Windsor 
Oaks Blvd., Virginia 



Beach. The homes are 
priced in the low $50*s, 
according to Blumling. 

Goodman Segar Hogan 
sales associates Bill Fully 
and Cynthia Conway are 
the on-site agents and are 
available to answer 
questions. The White 
Oaks model telephone 
number is 495-2661. 
Models are open noon un- 
til 6 p.m. daily. 



a 




ODE 



TOWNE 



A Custom Townhouse Conwnunity in 

the Urban Tradition. We offer 

exceptional quality at 

affordable prices 




DIRECTIONS Emt (rom Expressway — 
Smith onto tndapcndenn Bivd Conttnue 
to N«w lnd«p«ndanc«. turn right on 
Sitv«r1»af Or Models on ieW 




KayAfdahl 
460-2770 



Home 
460-161Q 



REALTY DIMENSIONS INC. 



490-2356 




'We're working hard to make 
you at home in Chesapeake" 

Rhodes Realty, 
Ltd. 



220 Battlefield Blvd., N. 
Chesapeake, VA 23320 

Open Sat. -Sun. 

482-4771 




We're Number 1 
In Great Bridge 

• Rcsideatial 

• CoaMcrclal 
•Fams 

SpccialblR 

S^vl^ Chcnpcalce »acc 1964 



^icartio, Jfnc. 

REALTORS® 

MILDRED B. RICARDO 
PRESIDENT 



ICM.TON* 




351 JokuslowH Road, CfecMpMke, Va. 

• In the Heart of Great Bridge 
• 547-4S53 




The road to suc(%^ starts when 
you are inspired to make the effort. 
We guarantee you will be 
motivated in just one hour with us. 
This success need not be 
specifically in sales. It can be yours 
from a working knowledge of the 
real ^tate market. 

So, why shouldn't you take that 
first step on the Road to Success! 

Call Us Today! 

Surety 

R^ Estate School 

5737 Princ«s Anne Road 
Virginia Beach, VA 23462 

499-2395 







5 110 Greenwich Rd. 

Va. Bch., VA 23462 

499-3330 

A DIVISION OF COLONIAL SERVICE CORPORATION 



OAtiantic Permanent Mortgage Company 

A Wholly Uwiied Subsidiary of Atlantic Permanent Federal 
Savings & Loan Association 

944 Independence Blvd. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455 

(804)460-1376/2810 







A DIVISION OF COL<WiAL SERVICE CORPORATION 

Virginia Beach Boulevard West 

Norfollc, Virginia 23510 

Phone (804) 623-3753 



LyOioriial cJitL 



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gency 



AMVBK»IOFCa.C»IIALSRVICECOkPORATION 

944 Independence Blvd. 
Va. Bch., VA 23455 



l^ift 



Virginia Beach Sun, March 23. 1983 3B 




^ 



GRAND OPENING 
MARCH 28-APRIL8. 



We think the opening of our new 
F&M office at Columbus Center is 
cause for celebratioa And we're 
giving away some great prizes to 
prove it. 

Fill in the sweepstakes entry 
form below, bring it to our new Co- 
lumbus Center office, March 28 thru 
April 8, and you could go home with 
a 25" RCA® Color Console TV with 
Remote Control; an Atari® "800" 
Home Computer with basic software 
and expandable memory to 48K: an 
F&M IRA deposit of $500, or a free 
regular-size safe deposit box for a year. 

Drawing. 2 P.M.. Friday April 8th. 
You must be 18 or older to enter. 
You don't have to be present or a 
customer to wia Limit one prize per 
family. Sony, mail-in entries riot 
eligible. 





Fill in below and bring 
to our new Columbus Cen- 
ter Office before April 8. 

SWEEPSTAKES 
ENTRY FORM 



GIFTS FOR ACXXXJNT 
DEPOSITS 

Open a new personal 
checkiig, interest/checking.^ 
savings or IRA account 
with a deposit of $300 or 
more, or make a $300 de- 
posit on an existing savings 
account, and receive a coupon for" 
two large 1 -gallon azalea plants from 
"The Great Big Greenhouse." 

Deposit $1,000 or more and 
get the two azaleas plus the 
beautiful Better Homes And 
Gardens book. Garden 
Flowers . Deposit $5,000 or 
more and get three azaleas 
and a Lawn- Boy lawn cart. 
Plus everyone gets a free 
gift just for stopping by. 
First & Merchants National 
Bank. Memb^ FDIC 

I Refreshments will be served 9 AM 
to 2 PM, March 28th. Plus everyone 
gets a free gift just for stopping by. 



^ 



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4B Virginia Beach Sun, March 23, 1983 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



I 




Professionalism 

By Roger Pyle 



For this weels article 
lett talk about what you 
should expe<^ from your 
residential Realtor if you 
are a homebuyer. 

F!nt <tf all, I need to 
emphasize that most Real- 
tors work on a commission 
basis. Hiey are to be 
admired for that. Ibeir 
pay is unequivocaUy tied 
to mtxiuctivity which is 
(me thing that the entire 
U.S. eoxiomy needs more 
of. Also, it takes lots of 
coverage and self confi- 
dence to work on 100^ 
conunission. If your Real- 
tor is providing good ser- 
vke, they deserve your 
loyalty. 

Good service to a home- 
buyer should include: 

1. If you are coming in 
from out <tf town, advance 
information packets 
should be sent to give 
you an overview of the 
area, ontUoing good resi- 
dential locations, routes to 
your irark aoi sdioois. 
Nfotel reservations and 
prtdit directkns on how 
to get there should be 
given. 

2. You should expect to 
be picked up at your 
HKitel, i»-ovided with an 



area briefing that includes 
where the best home 
values are in your price 
range, routes and dis- 
tances to your work, 
schools and recreation. 

3. Your Realtor should 
then show you all the 
suitable property in your 
price range. They should 
be able to explain differ- 
ences in construction, 
location and financing. 
Here's where the Icqralty 
comes in. If your Realtor 
is doing a good job for 
you, for heavens sake stay 
with them. If you go out 
with another Realtor, it is 
the same as dropping your 
original Realtor cdd. If 
that's what you want to 
do, it's perfectly permis- 
sable, but if your Realtor 
is doing a good job, stay 
with them. 

4. Your Realtor can help 
you make your final selec- 
tion of the right home, 
advise you o